News

  • AliveCor catches four times as many AFib cases as traditional screening in year-long study
    8 September 2017

    AliveCor, makers of the Kardia Mobile smartphone-connected ECG, announced the results of several major studies of the technology, including one that was published online today in Circulation, the journal of the American Heart Association. The studies show the effectiveness of the technology in discovering atrial fibrillation that might otherwise have gone undetected, as well as its ease of use.

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  • Wide variations in CV care: A wake-up call for cardiologists
    theHeart.org, 9 July 2013

    If you are a cardiologist in the US, today's issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association will make for tough reading. Two articles shine a bright light on blemishes in practice patterns.

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  • AHSNs to be relicensed as NHS ‘centrepiece for innovation’
    27 July 2017

    NHS England has confirmed its intention to relicense England’s 15 Academic Health Science Networks.

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  • Cardiac tachyarrhythmias and patient values and preferences for their management
    27 June 2017

    Cardiac tachyarrhythmias are recurrent or chronic and in some cases life-threatening conditions. Heart rhythm disturbances are often highly symptomatic and the psychological impact of the disease can be significant. Patients' beliefs and knowledge about their health (and illness), medications, and healthcare they receive are important determinants of whether or not they accept recommended treatments; influence their coping responses to their illness and treatment; adherence to recommended therapy; and ultimately affects health outcomes. Incorporation of patients' values and preferences for therapy should now be considered as an integral part of the decision-making process and treatment strategy. It is important to acknowledge and understand the impact of cardiac tachyarrhythmias on the patient. To address this issue, a Task Force was convened by the European Heart Rhythm Association (EHRA), and endorsed by the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS), Asia-Pacific Heart Rhythm Society (APHRS), and Sociedad Latinoamericana de Estimulación Cardíaca y Electrofisiología (SOLEACE), with the remit to comprehensively review the published evidence available, to publish a joint consensus document on patient values and preferences for the management of cardiac tachyarrhythmias, and to provide up-to-date consensus recommendations for use in clinical practice.

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  • Screening strategies for atrial fibrillation: a systematic review and cost-effectiveness analysis
    26 June 2017

    A national screening programme for atrial fibrillation is likely to represent a cost-effective use of resources, with systematic opportunistic screening more likely to be cost-effective than systematic population screening.

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  • KSS AHSN Alliance for AF: Dashboard Report Summary 1 
    22 June 2017

    An update on the collaborative project: Alliance for Atrial Fibrillation

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  • IMPORTANT NEWS: International publication recommends screening for AF in people aged 65 years and over.
    9 May 2017

    The current issue of Circulation carries a White Paper written by AF-Screen International that recommends that National Governments worldwide set up screening for AF in people 65 years and over. We welcome this important publication as it reinforces the position of Arrhythmia Alliance and AF Association of the importance of identifying the undiagnosed person to help reduce the number unnecessary AF-related strokes and related deaths.

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  • The role of obesity in atrial fibrillation
    20 Apirl 2017

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is commonly associated with overweight and obesity. Both conditions have been identified as major global epidemics associated with increased mortality and morbidity. 

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  • AF care pathway business case model
    20/03/2017

    Public Health England (PHE) and the Academic Health Science Networks (AHSNs) have collaborated on a nationwide programme to identify locally targeted initiatives that aim to reduce rates of Atrial Fibrillation (AF)-related stroke across England and have recently published the AF care pathway business case model. This is a valuable resource for local clinical and health investment decision makers as it brings together publically available data on AF to identify gaps and opportunities for improvement across the patient care pathway. Using the model, each organisation is able to review a set of specific interventions to address local needs and evaluate the most efficient focus of investment and resources in their region. 

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  • Anticoagulation news
    24/03/2017

    A roundup of the latest news in the area of anticoagulation.

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  • ACC: NOAC Safer for Use in Afib Ablation
    20/03/2017

    WASHINGTON -- Uninterrupted anticoagulation during atrial fibrillation ablation was associated with less bleeding when using dabigatran (Pradaxa) than warfarin (Coumadin), the RE-CIRCUIT trial showed.

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  • Combining risk score tools improves stroke prediction for atrial fibrillation patients
    20/03/2017

    Combining two independent, scientifically-proven risk measurements allows physicians to better predict an atrial fibrillation patient's risk of stroke or death. The tools also help determine the need for blood thinners in treatment, according to new research from researchers at the Intermountain Medical Center Heart Institute in Salt Lake City.
     

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  • Atrial fibrillation patients may safely discontinue blood thinners after successful ablation
    20/03/2017

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is a quivering or irregular heartbeat that can lead to blood clots, stroke, heart failure and other cardiovascular complications, and it is estimated to afflict nearly three million Americans.

     

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  • 85% of atrial fibrillation patients receive inadequate anticoagulation prior to stroke
    20/03/2017

    Nearly 85 percent of patients with a history of atrial fibrillation who had an acute ischemic stroke did not receive guideline-recommended anticoagulation or had anticoagulation levels that did not fall in the therapeutic range, according to a registry analysis.

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  • Warfarin use for atrial fibrillation increases dementia risk
    Medical News Today, 5 May 2016

    Atrial fibrillation is a relatively common condition, and - because of the aging population - it is becoming more common. This rise is mirrored by elevated usage of the blood-thinning drug, warfarin. The drug has saved countless lives, but new research shows a hidden danger - an increased risk of dementia in atrial fibrillation patients.

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  • House Calls; NOAC Dosing; Athlete Screening; Afib Search
    MedPage Today, 22 April 2016

    Cardiac nurse-led, home-based interventions for patients after discharge with various chronic heart conditions work, a meta-analysis of three randomized trials in Circulation concluded.

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  • Catheter Ablation for Atrial Fibrillation and Outcomes
    American College of Cardiology, 22 April 2016

    Is catheter ablation of atrial fibrillation (AF) associated with improved outcomes?

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  • Real-World Study Largely Confirms Effects of Apixaban, Rivaroxaban for A-fib
    TCTMD, 20 April 2016

    An analysis of claims data shows that both rivaroxaban and apixaban carry lower risks of intracranial hemorrhage (ICH) versus warfarin when used in everyday practice for patients with nonvalvular A-fib. Only rivaroxaban was associated with a reduced risk of the composite of ICH and ischemic stroke, however; in fact, the rate of ischemic stroke was numerically—though not significantly—higher with apixaban than with warfarin.

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  • GP prescribing budgets under pressure as anticoagulation costs soar 60%
    GP Online, 20 April 2016

    GP leaders warned that NOACs have become the first-line treatment for many patients diagnosed in hospital, and primary care was having to pick up the bill to continue paying for patients’ treatments.

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  • Study: Warfarin Still a Good Option for Afib Stroke Prevention
    MedPage Today, 21 April 2016

    When well-managed, warfarin (Coumadin) therapy is still a valid alternative for preventing stroke associated with atrial fibrillation (afib), with a low risk of complications and all-cause mortality, researchers said.

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  • AFib Plus TAVR Riskier for Midterm Outcomes
    Medpage Today, 19 April 2016

    Atrial fibrillation patients getting transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) carry heavier risks of poor outcomes after the procedure, a registry study showed.

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  • Predicting Bleeding Risk in Atrial Fibrillation Patients Treated with Anticoagulants
    HCP Live, 18 April 2016

    A new analysis of serious bleeds among patients who use the blood thinner warfarin to treat atrial fibrillation (AFib) found that consideration of anticoagulation quality would improve the accuracy of 3 bleeding risk scores. 

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  • Reduced stroke risk for AF patients taking Bayer’s Xarelto, new data shows
    The Pharma Letter. 18 April 2016

    New data shows reduced risk of ischemic stroke and intracranial hemorrhage (ICH) among patients with non-valvular atrial fibrillation (AF) receiving German pharma major Bayer’s (BAYN: DE) Xarelto (rivaroxaban), compared with those taking warfarin.

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  • Infographic: Atrial Fibrillation and Heart Failure
    MedPage Today, 15 April 2016

    No one completely understands why or how heart failure increases the risk of atrial fibrillation (Afib). But it is abundantly clear that the risk increases with the severity of structural disease.

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  • "Ice” ablation is non-inferior to “fire” ablation for paroxysmal AF
    Cardiac Rhythm News, 14 April 2016

    The largest randomised trial comparing cryoballoon ablation “Ice” with radiofrequency ablation “fire”—FIRE AND ICE—indicates there are not significant differences in outcomes between the two approaches for drug-refractory paroxysmal atrial fibrillation (AF) patients. Results also showed that the mean total procedure time was shorter with cryoballoon ablation but the mean total fluoroscopy time was shorter with radiofrequency ablation.

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  • Opportunistic screening of atrial fibrillation by automatic blood pressure measurement in the community
    BMJ Open, 13 April 2016

    Timely detection of atrial fibrillation (AF) may effectively prevent cardiovascular consequences. However, traditional diagnostic tools are either poorly reliable (pulse palpation) or not readily accessible (ECG) in general practice. We tested whether an automatic oscillometric blood pressure (BP) monitor embedded with an algorithm for AF detection might be effective for opportunistic screening of asymptomatic AF in the community.

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  • New blood thinners reduce atrial fibrillation stroke risk without frequent monitoring
    Medical Express, 13 April 2016

    A new generation of blood thinners can reduce the risk of stroke in patients with atrial fibrillation, without requiring frequent monitoring and dietary restrictions.                                 

     

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  • Persistent AFib Tied to Less Physical Activity After ICD
    MedPage, 10 April 2016

    Symptoms of poor functional status during persistent atrial fibrillation (Afib) may be under-reported, a retrospective study in patients with implantable cardiac devices (ICDs) found.

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  • ACC: Afib Often Present Before Stroke in Patients With ICD
    MedPage Today, 11 April 206

    More than one-third of strokes occurred within the 30 days after atrial fibrillation episodes were recorded on implantable cardiac devices (ICDs), according to a single center study.

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  • Heart Monitors Allow Afib Patients to Go Off Drugs
    MedPage Today, 8 April 2016

    The use of insertable cardiac monitors may allow doctors to wean some patients diagnosed with paroxysmal atrial fibrillation off anticoagulants, researchers suggested here at the annual scientific session of the American College of Cardiology.

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  • ACC: Exercise Linked to Better Afib Outcomes
    MedPage Today, 10 April 2016

    A pair of studies indicate that patients diagnosed with atrial fibrillation who can exercise have better outcomes than those who are sedentary, researchers said here at the annual scientific sessions of the American College of Cardiology.

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  • Unexpected Loss of Life Partner Raises Risk of Atrial Fibrillation in Bereaved Spouse
    Medical Research, 7 April 2016

    Our study reports that spousal bereavement is followed by a transiently increased risk of new onset of atrial fibrillation (AF). The risk was highest 8-14 days after the loss and remains elevated for one year.

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  • Afib Trials: Rate vs Rhythm; Fire vs Ice
    MedPage Today, 4 April 2016

    What are the best clinical strategies for atrial fibrillation treatment? Two new studies suggest largely similar outcomes between medical treatments and between catheter-based ablation approaches.

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  • CardioFocus' HeartLight® System Granted FDA Approval for Treatment of Atrial Fibrillation (AF)
    PR Newswire, 4 April 2016

    CardioFocus, Inc. today announced that it has received premarket approval (PMA) from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for its HeartLight® Endoscopic Ablation System for the treatment of patients with paroxysmal atrial fibrillation (AF). The approved PMA submission contained comprehensive safety and effectiveness data from the Company's multi-center HeartLight U.S. Pivotal Clinical Study, a randomized, controlled study in which a total of 353 participants were randomized at 19 leading arrhythmia centers across the United States1.

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  • Two atrial fibrillation ablation techniques equal on efficacy and safety
    Medical Press, 4 April 2016

    Two established techniques for correcting the root cause of the heart rhythm disorder atrial fibrillation show similar effects and safety outcomes, according to research presented at the American College of Cardiology's 65th Annual Scientific Session.

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  • EHRA webinar on LAA Occlusion: When and How?
    EHRA, 4 April 2016

    Book your calendar and register before April 18, for the upcoming webinar, highlighting LAA Occlusion: When and How?

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  • Who are atrial fibrillation candidates for antiarrhythmic drugs in this new era of ablation?
    Cardiac Rhythm News, 30 March 2016

    The role of ablation for atrial fibrillation has grown rapidly. Several factors have allowed that growth. Among those are the improvement of ablation tools and protocols, the increasing number of laboratories and physicians trained to perform the procedures. As the success rates have increased, ablation has been designated as a first-line option for some patients in the American College of Cardiology (ACC) / American Heart Association (AHA) / Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) algorithm for atrial fibrillation management. Nonetheless, antiarrhythmic drugs still have a major role in the management of rhythm control in patients with atrial fibrillation.

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  • Open-Irrigated Catheter Aids Treatment of Atrial Flutter
    HospiMedica, 28 March 2016

    A novel radiofrequency (RF) ablation catheter provides an elegant cooling platform for treating atrial flutter (AF), with robust handling capabilities.

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  • NOACs no better than Warfarin against Thrombi in Afib
    MedPage Today, 25 March 2016

    Atrial fibrillation (afib) patients treated with continuous non-vitamin K oral anticoagulant (NOAC) therapy still need to be evaluated for thrombi before undergoing catheter ablation, according to a study.

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  • Many patients with high stroke risk don’t get needed blood thinners
    Reuters, 24 March 2016

    Patients who have a heart rhythm disorder that can come with a high risk of stroke often don’t receive blood-thinning medications that can make this complication less likely, a U.S. study suggests.

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  • Treatment of Atrial Fibrillation
    Radcliffe Cardiology, 21 March 2016

    Dr Mark Gallagher discusses 'Treatment of Atrial Fibrillation' with Radcliffe Cardiology

    This video interview was conducted at the ‘Advances in the Pathogenesis and Management of Cardiovascular Disease’ meeting held at the Royal College of Surgeons in London, UK on the 27th November 2015

    Read more

     

  • Real-World Data on XARELTO® in Patients with Non-Valvular Atrial Fibrillation and Diabetes Among 14 Presentations at American College of Cardiology's 65th Annual Scientific Session
    PR Newswire, 21 March 2016

    Janssen Pharmaceuticals, Inc., and its development partner, Bayer, today announced that 14 data presentations will be presented at the American College of Cardiology's 65th Annual Scientific Session (ACC.16), including real-world findings confirming the safety of XARELTO® (rivaroxaban) in a high-risk group of patients with non-valvular atrial fibrillation (NVAF) and concomitant diabetes. This real-world research complements the XARELTO® clinical trials by providing important insights to physicians on how the medicine is performing in patients seen in everyday practice.

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  • Atrial fibrillation patients at highest stroke risk not prescribed necessary medication
    Medical Press, 16 March 2016

    Nearly half of all atrial fibrillation (AF) patients at the highest risk for stroke are not being prescribed blood thinners by their cardiologists, according to a new study by researchers at University of California, San Diego School of Medicine and University of California, San Francisco.

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  • Newly Published Study Confirms Reduction in Retained Blood and Postoperative Atrial Fibrillation After Heart Surgery with PleuraFlow Active Clearance Technology
    Business Wire, 9 March 2016

    ClearFlow Inc., a medical device company based in Anaheim, California, has announced the publication of significantly positive results in a study evaluating the company’s PleuraFlow® Active Clearance Technology® System. Data indicating a marked reduction in Retained Blood Syndrome (RBS) and Postoperative Atrial Fibrillation (POAF) among patients recovering from heart surgery was published in the March issue of the Journal of Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery.

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  • Brain Bleed Risk From Warfarin May Be Higher Than Thought
    HealthDay, 9 March 2016

    The widely used blood thinner warfarin -- also known as Coumadin -- may raise the risk of severe bleeding inside the skull by much more than previously thought, a new study suggests.

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  • Atrial Fibrillation Diagnosed At Earlier Age in Patients With Family History of AFib
    Medical Research, 9 March 2016

    Atrial fibrillation seems to accumulate in families and several studies have indicated that a family history of atrial fibrillation may be an important risk factor for developing atrial fibrillation.

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  • Women at Risk of Missing Out on Oral Anticoagulation for Atrial Fib
    Medscape, 3 March 2016

    Among American outpatients with atrial fibrillation (AF) and a clear indication for an oral anticoagulant (a CHA2DS2-VASc score ≥2), women and patients with vascular disease were less likely to receive this recommended therapy, according to a new study.

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  • Acupuncture Prevents Atrial Fibrillation
    Health CMi, 2 March 2016

    Acupuncture prevents atrial fibrillation (AF) and associated cardiac damage. Research published by Zhu et al. finds acupuncture applied to acupoint Neiguan (PC6) has an anti-arrhythmia effect and prevents atrial fibrillation through restoration and remodeling of the right atrial appendage. This is consistent with findings presented by the Heart Rhythm Society and published in the Heart Rhythm Journal.

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  • ISC: Higher Recurrent Stroke Risk With Persistent Afib
    MedPage Today, 22 February 2016

    Stroke patients with persistent atrial fibrillation (AF) have a higher risk of ischemic events than those with paroxysmal disease, researchers reported here.

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  • Differences in attitude, education, and knowledge about oral anticoagulation therapy among patients with atrial fibrillation in Europe: result of a self-assessment patient survey conducted by the European Heart Rhythm Association
    Oxford Journal, 21 February 2016

    The purpose of this patient survey was to analyse the knowledge about blood thinning medications relative to gender, age, education, and region of residence in patients with atrial fibrillation (AF).

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  • 'Indian Consensus Guidance on Stroke Prevention in Atrial Fibrillation’ launched
    ET Healthworld, 19 February 2016

    Understanding the need to address challenges faced by Indian doctors in Stroke Prevention, leading Cardiologists across India formulated and published 'Indian Consensus Guidance on Stroke Prevention in Atrial Fibrillation' in association with the SPAF Academy India Experts (Stroke Prevention in Atrial Fibrillation).

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  • ISC: Afib on the Rise in Stroke, TIA
    Medpage Today, 18 February 2016

    Atrial fibrillation prevalence in ischemic stroke and transient ischemic attack (TIA) appears to be more common than previously believed, and it is associated with higher mortality, a national study showed.

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  • AliveCor Heart Monitor used to detect postoperative atrial fibrillation after heart surgery
    iMedicalApps, 18 February 2016

    In a recent study, prescription of the AliveCor Heart Monitor to patients with an episode of atrial fibrillation (AF) after heart surgery improved detection of postoperative atrial fibrillation after discharge – even when no symptoms were present.

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  • Left atrial appendage isolation with cryoballoon may work as an adjunctive strategy for persistent AF treatment
    Cardiac Rhythm News, 16 February 2016

    Researchers in Turkey have found that additional left atrial appendage (LAA) isolation using second generation cryoballoon technology is feasible and safe and that it may be considered as an adjunctive therapy to pulmonary vein isolation for persistent atrial fibrillation (AF) treatment.

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  • Leading cardiologists unveil ‘Indian Consensus Guidance on Stroke Prevention in Atrial Fibrillation’
    Pharmabiz, 10 February 2016

    For the first time in the country, 14 leading cardiologists from across the country have launched 'Indian consensus guidance on stroke prevention in atrial fibrillation' to help doctors with diagnosis and management procedures to prevent stroke in patients with atrial fibrillation (AF).

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  • Medicare gives boost to Boston Scientific's device to help prevent strokes
    Star Tribune, 9 February 2016

    The Watchman Left Atrial Appendage Closure Device from Boston Scientific was developed in the Twin Cities by Aritech, which was bought by Boston. The device is designed to reduce stroke risk in patients with atrial fibrillation. It has recently been approved for use in the U.S.

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  • EMA concludes defective device in ROCKET study does not impact Xarelto’s safety
    European Medicines Agency, 5 February 2016

    The European Medicines Agency (EMA) has concluded that a defect with the international normalised ratio (INR) device used in the ROCKET study does not change its conclusions on the overall safety or benefit-risk balance of Xarelto (rivaroxaban). The ROCKET study was the main clinical trial underpinning the use of this anti-clotting medicine in patients with non-valvular atrial fibrillation (irregular heartbeat).

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  • NICE moves to improve stroke prevention
    Pharma Times, 1 February 2016

     The National Institute for Health and Care Excellence is consulting on a set of new indicators for GPs and commissioners designed to improve the management of atrial fibrillation and prevent thousands of case of stroke.

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  • Low prescription of NOACs criticised
    Prescriber, 1 February 2016

    The low number of non-vitamin k oral anti-coagulants prescribed for people with atrial fibrillation and the stark difference in prescribing rates across the country ‘make a mockery’ of the concept of a national health service, according to the Atrial Fibrillation Association.

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  • In the Real World, Dabigatran and Warfarin Give Equal Stroke Protection to A-fib Patients
    TCTMD, 26 January 2016

    Out in everyday clinical practice, dabigatran 150 mg and warfarin provide comparable ischemic stroke protection for patients with nonvalvular A-fib, pooled observational data suggest. The direct thrombin inhibitor, however, comes with a lower risk for intracranial bleeding and a greater risk of GI bleeding, especially in older populations.

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  • SCSLhealth announces excellent TTR for INRstar patients
    SCSL Health, 21 January 2016

    SCSLhealth, the company behind INRstar - the award-winning software for anticoagulation (AC) management – today announced that on 1 January 2016, the Location Time in Therapeutic Range (Location TTR) – also known as Centre TTR (cTTR) - for all patients treated at INRstar locations over the previous 12 months was 75.1%. 

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  • Doctor at Easton Hospital pioneers new drug-free treatment for AFib
    The Morning Call, 23 January 2016

    Jo Ellen Reed got the bad news after experiencing an alarming fluttering sensation in her chest: The 59-year-old Phillipsburg, N.J., resident was diagnosed with atrial fibrillation.

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  • Catheter Ablation Doesn't Provoke Repeat Stroke
    Medpage Today, 21 January 2016

    Catheter ablation for atrial fibrillation (Afib) may be safe even for patients with a history of stroke, according to a single-center study.

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  • Women May be at Greater Risk of A-Fib Than Men
    MPR, 21 January 2016

    Atrial fibrillation is a stronger risk factor for stroke, cardiac events, heart failure, and death in women than it is in men, according to an analysis published online January 19 in The BMJ.

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  • Shorter time from diagnosis to ablation improves persistent AF outcomes
    Cardiology Today, 18 January 2016

    In a study of patients with persistent atrial fibrillation, a shorter time from diagnosis to first catheter ablation was associated with reduced risk for atrial fibrillation recurrence at 2 years. 

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  • Don't Wait to Ablate AF: Time Since Diagnosis Affects Ablation Success in Study
    Medscape, 18 January 2016

    The length of time between diagnosis of persistent atrial fibrillation (AF) and catheter ablation has a significant impact on the procedure's success, in that the longer the interval, the worse the outcomes, suggests an analysis from a single but highly experienced center[1]. Longer delays also correlated with increased B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP) and C-reactive protein (CRP) levels.

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  • Personalizing anticoagulant treatments for nonvalvular atrial fibrillation
    Clinical Advisor, 14 January 2016

    The American Heart Association estimates that atrial fibrillation (AF) affects approximately 2.7 million Americans.1 It is projected that cases of AF will increase to 12.1 million by the year 2030; however, there is much uncertainty within the magnitude of future trends in capturing diagnosis and morbidity of the sequela associated with AF.2 In addition to being the most common cardiac arrhythmia, AF is also classified as the most common rhythm disorder among adults aged older than 65 years living in the United States.

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  • Expert suggests there is ‘no absolute age cut-off for anticoagulation’
    arrhythmia watch, 14 January 2016

    Given the challenges of antithrombotic treatment in the elderly, the European Society of Cardiology (ESC) Working Group on Thrombosis task group has recently published an expert position paper on this important topic.

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  • Education and practice gaps on atrial fibrillation and anticoagulation: a survey of cardiovascular nurses
    BMC Medical Education, 11 January 2016

    Patients’ knowledge of their atrial fibrillation (AF) and anticoagulation therapy are determinants of the efficacy of thromboprophylaxis. Nurses may be well placed to provide counselling and education to patients on all aspects of anticoagulation, including self-management. It is important that nurses are well informed to provide optimal education to patients. Current practice and knowledge of cardiovascular nurses on AF and anticoagulation in the Australian and New Zealand (ANZ) context is not well reported.

    Read more

     

  • Expert Roundtable: Challenging Cases in Stroke Prevention for AF
    PeerVoice, 8 January 2016

    Watch and listen to the Q&A with Dr. Ruff, these are based on questions submitted by your peers.

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  • Primary Care Atrial Fibrillation Service
    BMJ Open, 9 December 2015

    Stroke-risk in atrial fibrillation (AF) can be significantly reduced by appropriate thromboembolic prophylaxis. However, National Institute for Health and Care Excellence estimates suggest that up to half of eligible patients with AF are not anticoagulated, with severe consequences for stroke prevention. We aimed to determine the outcome of an innovative Primary Care AF (PCAF) service on anticoagulation uptake in a cohort of high-risk patients with AF in the UK.

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  • Early detection of occult atrial fibrillation and stroke prevention
    Heart BMJ, 2 December 2015

    Currently, guidelines for the early detection and treatment of occult AF are limited. This review addresses recent advancements in
    occult AF detection methods, identification of populations at high risk for occult AF, the treatment of 
    occult AF with oral anticoagulation, as well as ongoing trials that may answer critically important questions regarding occult AF screening.

    Read more

     

  • AF Stroke
    By Greg Fell, Consultant in Public Health, 1 December 2015

    A practical guide on how to improve population coverage of anticoagulation for commissioners, Clinical Commissioning Groups, Commissioning Support Units and Local Health Boards

    Read more

     

  • Sidcup pensioner one of first to benefit from new stroke prevention technology
    Bexley Times, 30 October 2015

    Horace Stapleton, 87, has been fitted with the Watchman device which prevents clot formation

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  • A roadmap to improve the quality of atrial fibrillation management
    ESC, 18 October 2015

    Here, we report the outcome of this conference, with a focus on (i) learning from our ‘neighbours’ to improve AF care, (ii) patient-centred approaches to AF management, (iii) structured care of AF patients, (iv) improving the quality of AF treatment, and (v) personalization of AF management. This report ends with a list of priorities for research in AF patients.

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  • Insights for Prevention of Stroke Due to Atrial Fibrillation: How Well Are We Doing in Clinical Practice?
    PeerVoice, 10 September 2015

    Listen and watch the presentations from Drs. Kirchhof and Ruff 

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  • No effect of ATP on late AF recurrence
    European Society of Cardiology, 31 August 2015

    Adenosine triphosphate (ATP)-guided pulmonary vein isolation (PVI) in comparison to conventional PVI did not reduce late recurrence atrial fibrillation (AF) at one year, according to the UNDER-ATP trial featured in the Atrial fibrillation/Pacing Hot Line session yesterday. The large-scale multicentre Japanese study was published simultaneously in the European Heart Journal.

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  • Atrial Fibrillation After Stroke
    American College of Cardiology, 20 August 2015

    Study Question:
    What is the incidence of atrial fibrillation (AF) after an ischemic stroke?

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  • Asymptomatic Atrial Fibrillation
    American Medical Association, 11 August 2015

    The case for screening to prevent stroke. 

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  • Atrial fibrillation: treatment and management
    NICE, July 2015

    This quality standard covers the treatment and management of atrial fibrillation (including paroxysmal, persistent and permanent atrial fibrillation, and atrial flutter) in adults (18 years and older). 

    Read more

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  • Are We Ready for Mass Screening to Detect Atrial Fibrillation?
    Jeffrey S.Healey, 30 July 2015

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is the most common cardiac arrhythmia1 and a leading cause of stroke.2 AF-related strokes are associated with significant morbidity, mortality, and healthcare costs,2–5 yet they are highly preventable.6,7 Unfortunately, AF is often undiagnosed or untreated when stroke occurs.8 Given the availability of effective oral anticoagulant (OAC) medications and evidence-based guidelines for their use,9–11 population-based AF screening has the potential to become an important public health program.

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  • Phase I study: Idarucizumab reverses anticoagulant effect of dabigatran in healthy volunteers
    News Medical, 17 June 2015

    Boehringer Ingelheim Pharmaceuticals, Inc. today announced that The Lancet published results from a phase I study investigating the effects of idarucizumab, an investigational agent, in reversing the anticoagulant effect of dabigatran in healthy volunteers. The data demonstrate that complete reversal was achieved following administration of idarucizumab. It was administered as either a single 5 minute infusion or as two five minute infusions given one hour apart. The reversal effect was sustained for more than 24 hours for all doses of 2g and above.

    In this phase 1 study, 47 male volunteers aged 18-45 received 220 mg of dabigatran twice daily for three days, followed by a single dose on day four. Idarucizumab was administered approximately two hours after the final dabigatran dose, in doses of 1 g, 2 g, or 4 g as a five-minute infusion, or as two five-minute infusions of 5 g and 2.5 g one hour apart. The primary endpoint was incidence of drug-related adverse events, analyzed in all randomly assigned participants who received at least one dose of dabigatran. In this study, there were no clinically relevant idarucizumab-related adverse events. Results showed that idarucizumab immediately and completely reversed dabigatran-induced anticoagulation and no procoagulant effects were found when measured by a specific assay.

    These data were initially presented at the American Heart Association's (AHA) Scientific Sessions 2013. Additional phase I data were presented at the AHA Scientific Sessions 2014 and the 2014 American Society for Hematology annual meeting (ASH)."These phase I results published inThe Lancet add to the growing body of evidence supporting idarucizumab. We are committed to the continued study and development of this specifically targeted reversal agent," said Sabine Luik, M.D., senior vice president, Medicine & Regulatory Affairs, Boehringer Ingelheim Pharmaceuticals, Inc. "If approved, idarucizumab has the potential to be a significant evolution in care by providing physicians with an option to rapidly reverse the anticoagulant effect of dabigatran in rare emergency situations."

    In April 2015, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration granted priority review to Boehringer Ingelheim's Biologics License Application (BLA) for idarucizumab.

    Read more

     

  • Benefits of a new class of oral anticoagulant
    nursingtimes.net, 13 Apr 2015

    Non-vitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulants offer an alternative to warfarin and heparins for treating atrial fibrillation and venous thromboembolism.

    Read more

     

  • National Audit of Cardiac Ablation 2013-14
    AF Association, 27 Mar 2015

    The National Cardiac Rhythm Management Ablation Audit is managed by the National Institute for Cardiovascular Outcomes Research (NICOR), which is part of the National Centre for Cardiovascular Prevention and Outcomes, based at University College London. Specialist clinical knowledge and leadership is provided by the British Cardiovascular Society and British Heart Rhythm Society. The strategic direction and development of the audit is determined by the Audit Steering Group. This includes major stakeholders in the audit, including cardiologists, the professional societies, physiologists, commissioners and patient group representatives.

    Download report

    Read response from AF Association

    Read more

     

  • FDA Approves New Oral Anticoagulant From Daiichi Sankyo
    Forbes, 9 Jan 2015

    important new oral anticoagulant marketplace: dabigatran (Pradaxa) from Boehringer Ingelheim, rivaroxaban (Xarelto) from Johnson & Johnson ...

    Read more

     

  • Dabigatran Carries Risk of GI Bleeding
    Medical Research News, 8 Jan 2015

    Response: The approval of dabigatran was considered a major contribution to the therapeutic arsenal of anticoagulants since warfarin, whose ...

    Read more

     

  • Atrial Fibrillation Patients and Doctors Have a Communication Gap
    Everyday health, 10 Dec

    One-third of patients don't know the stroke symptoms to look for, and surveyed doctors say their atrial fibrillation patients don't understand stroke risk

    Read more

     

  • European atlas on prevention of AF-related stroke
    28 Nov 2014

    The Route Map and European Atlas on the prevention of AF-related stroke is a new report that shows the state of play in different countries across Europe on the prevention of AF-related stroke.

    Read more

     

  • Does Digoxin Really Increase Mortality Among Outpatients With Atrial Fibrillation?
    PharmacyTimes, 15 Oct 2014

    Digoxin is currently recommended as a pharmacological rate control strategy in atrial fibrillation (AF) patients with heart failure or left ventricular ...

    Read more

     

  • NICE's quality standards programme
    NICE, 2 Oct 2014

    The Department of Health has now asked NICE to develop further standards and associated guidelines to tackle the areas of growing burden on public health. NICE will develop over 70 quality standards in public health.

    Read more

     

  • Mass screening identifies untreated AF in 5% of 75-76 year olds
    ESC, 31 Aug 2014

    Amsterdam, The Netherlands – Saturday 31 August 2013: Mass screening in more than 25,000 Swedish residents has identified untreated atrial fibrillation in 5% of 75-76 year olds, putting them at increased stroke risk. 

    Read more

     

  • GRASP the Initiative Action Plan
    2 Nov 2014

    GRASP-AF tool was designed to support GPs audit their management of AF patients  and help
    identify patients who had presented to their GP, but had not yet been recorded as having AF.

    Read more

     

  • Surgical Treatment of Atrial Fibrillation in Patient with Atrial Myxoma Using Bipolar Radiofrequency ...
    Experimental & Clinical Cardiology, 17 Aug 2014

    Surgical Treatment of Atrial Fibrillation in Patient with Atrial Myxoma Using Bipolar Radiofrequency Ablation Authors: Hui Ouyang, Xiaochen Wu, ...

    Read more

     

  • The preventive effect of atorvastatin on atrial fibrillation: a meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials
    7thSpace Interactive (press release), 13 Aug 2014

    A number of clinical and experimental studies have investigated the effect of atorvastatin on atrial fibrillation (AF), but the results are equivocal.

    Read more

     

  • Boehringer continues award-winning ChatAFib TweetChat
    PMLive (blog), 8 July 2014

    Those attending will hear from the likes of Trudie Lobban from The Atrial Fibrillation Association, Professor Richard Schilling from Barts Health NHS ...

    Read more

     

  • Catheter ablation a first-line treatment for atrial flutter
    Medical Xpress, 1 July 2014

    Use of catheter ablation is not only beneficial for treating atrial flutter but also can significantly reduce hospital visits – both inpatient and emergency ...

    Read more

     

  • Medtronic study shows benefits of Reveal XT cardiac monitor
    Zenopa, 1 July 2014

    Medtronic's Reveal XT Insertable Cardiac Monitor (ICM) is superior to standard care when it comes to detecting atrial fibrillation (AF) in patients who ...

    Read more

     

  • Boehringer Ingelheim initiates study of Pradaxa in patients undergoing AF ablation
    Healio, 29 June 2014

    RE-CIRCUIT is one of several trials within the RE-VOLUTION clinical trial program for dabigatran (Pradaxa). The program is evaluating the use of the ...

    Read more

     

  • Boehringer Ingelheim initiates study of Pradaxa in patients undergoing AF ablation
    Healio, 29 June 2014

    RE-CIRCUIT is one of several trials within the RE-VOLUTION clinical trial program for dabigatran (Pradaxa). The program is evaluating the use of the ...

    Read more

     

  • Breakthrough status for BI's Pradaxa antidote
    Phama Times, 19 June 2014

    Idarucizumab is a fully humanised antibody fragment designed specifically to reverse the anticoagulant effects of Pradaxa (dabigatran etexilate).

    Read more

     

  • Breakthrough status for BI's Pradaxa antidote
    Phama Times, 19 June 2014

    Idarucizumab is a fully humanised antibody fragment designed specifically to reverse the anticoagulant effects of Pradaxa (dabigatran etexilate).

    Read more

     

  • Aspirin could be harmful for Heart Patients, a study revealed
    Sahara Samay, 20 June 2014

    Aspirin could be harmful for Heart Patients, a study revealed ... no longer be used to prevent strokes in people with a common heart rhythm disorder.

    Read more

     

  • Aspirin could be harmful for Heart Patients, a study revealed
    Sahara Samay, 20 June 2014

    Aspirin could be harmful for Heart Patients, a study revealed ... no longer be used to prevent strokes in people with a common heart rhythm disorder.

    Read more

     

  • Heart treatment guidelines
    Times of Malta, 19 June 2014

    Aspirin has commonly been used to treat atrial fibrillation (AF), a heart rhythm disorder, which affects 1.5 per cent of the population in the UK.

    Read more

     

  • Heart treatment guidelines
    Times of Malta, 19 June 2014

    Aspirin has commonly been used to treat atrial fibrillation (AF), a heart rhythm disorder, which affects 1.5 per cent of the population in the UK.

    Read more

     

  • Top US Heart Treatment Centers, Patient Group, Form Alliance to Improve Irregular Heartbeat Care
    StopAfib.org, 19 June 2014

    Top U.S. heart centers implement a collaborative, multidisciplinary alliance to improve the treatment of patients with a type of irregular heartbeat called ...

    Read more

     

  • Top US Heart Treatment Centers, Patient Group, Form Alliance to Improve Irregular Heartbeat Care
    StopAfib.org, 19 June 2014

    Top U.S. heart centers implement a collaborative, multidisciplinary alliance to improve the treatment of patients with a type of irregular heartbeat called ...

    Read more

     

  • Aspirin could be the wrong drug for thousands of heart patients
    First Female, 19 June 2014

    Jo Jerrome, Deputy CEO, AF Association comments: “AF is extremely common – we each have a one in four chance of developing this irregular ...

    Read more

     

  • Aspirin could be the wrong drug for thousands of heart patients
    First Female, 19 June 2014

    Jo Jerrome, Deputy CEO, AF Association comments: “AF is extremely common – we each have a one in four chance of developing this irregular ...

    Read more

     

  • Aspirin may not be good enough to treat irregular heart beat
    This is the West country, 19 June 2014

    Many patients with an irregular heartbeat, which increases the risk of having a stroke, should be prescribed Warfarin or similar blood-thinning ...

    Read more

     

  • Aspirin may not be good enough to treat irregular heart beat
    This is the West country, 19 June 2014

    Many patients with an irregular heartbeat, which increases the risk of having a stroke, should be prescribed Warfarin or similar blood-thinning ...

    Read more

     

  • Doctors advised against aspirin for patients with irregular heart rhythm
    The Guardian, 18 June 2014

    Aspirin should no longer be used to try to prevent strokes in people with a common heart rhythm disorder as it is ineffective and has acted as a ...

    Read more

     

  • Doctors advised against aspirin for patients with irregular heart rhythm
    The Guardian, 18 June 2014

    Aspirin should no longer be used to try to prevent strokes in people with a common heart rhythm disorder as it is ineffective and has acted as a ...

    Read more

     

  • Exmouth's stroke rehab unit could go to Exeter
    Exmouth Journal, 17 June 2014

    Every year around 700 people in Exeter, East Devon and Mid Devon suffer a stroke, and all get treated at the Royal Devon & Exeter Hospital.

    Read more

     

  • Exmouth's stroke rehab unit could go to Exeter
    Exmouth Journal, 17 June 2014

    Every year around 700 people in Exeter, East Devon and Mid Devon suffer a stroke, and all get treated at the Royal Devon & Exeter Hospital.

    Read more

     

  • XARELTO safe for use with elderly, study finds
    McKnights long term care news, 17 June 2014

    XARELTO® (rivaroxaban) is safe to use in elderly patients with nonvalvular atrial fibrillation, an analysis published in Circulation finds. The ROCKET ...

    Read more

     

  • XARELTO safe for use with elderly, study finds
    McKnights long term care news, 17 June 2014

    XARELTO® (rivaroxaban) is safe to use in elderly patients with nonvalvular atrial fibrillation, an analysis published in Circulation finds. The ROCKET ...

    Read more

     

  • Onslow Memorial Hospital: 8 Ways to prevent stroke
    Jacksonville Daily News, 15 June 2014

    According to the National STROKE Association (NSA), stroke is the fourth leading cause of death in America and a leading cause of adult disability.

    Read more

     

  • Onslow Memorial Hospital: 8 Ways to prevent stroke
    Jacksonville Daily News, 15 June 2014

    According to the National STROKE Association (NSA), stroke is the fourth leading cause of death in America and a leading cause of adult disability.

    Read more

     

  • Retaining stroke services at Yeovil Hospital will help to save £1.8 million, it is claimed
    Western Gazette, 15 June 2014

    If plans to close emergency stroke services in Yeovil had been introduced patients living over the Dorset border would have been treated in Dorset ...

    Read more

     

  • Retaining stroke services at Yeovil Hospital will help to save £1.8 million, it is claimed
    Western Gazette, 15 June 2014

    If plans to close emergency stroke services in Yeovil had been introduced patients living over the Dorset border would have been treated in Dorset ...

    Read more

     

  • Aspirin won't stop strokes, say experts - but GPs will still be paid to give it out
    Daily Mail, 8 June 2014

    Doctors are funded for prescribing aspirin to patients with atrial fibrillation (AF), a type of irregular heartbeat, until April 2015. Cyril Barnes out side his ...

    Read more

     

  • Aspirin won't stop strokes, say experts - but GPs will still be paid to give it out
    Daily Mail, 8 June 2014

    Doctors are funded for prescribing aspirin to patients with atrial fibrillation (AF), a type of irregular heartbeat, until April 2015. Cyril Barnes out side his ...

    Read more

     

  • Aspirin "not best" for preventing strokes
    BBC news, 10 June 2014

    From the National Institute of Health and Care Excellence (NICE) are set to recommend other drugs instead for patients with an irregular heartbeat, ...

    Read more

     

  • Aspirin "not best" for preventing strokes
    BBC news, 10 June 2014

    From the National Institute of Health and Care Excellence (NICE) are set to recommend other drugs instead for patients with an irregular heartbeat, ...

    Read more

     

  • Campaign to raise awareness of common heart rhythm disorder
    Bournemouth Echo, 7 June 2014

    Many people suffer no symptoms, but possible symptoms include dizziness, shortness of breath, a fast, irregular heartbeat (palpitations) and feeling ...

    Read more

     

  • Campaign to raise awareness of common heart rhythm disorder
    Bournemouth Echo, 7 June 2014

    Many people suffer no symptoms, but possible symptoms include dizziness, shortness of breath, a fast, irregular heartbeat (palpitations) and feeling ...

    Read more

     

  • Cardio Notes: Xarelto for Seniors, Carotid Stenting Death
    MedPage Today, 9 June 2014

    Rivaroxaban (Xarelto) matched warfarin in both older and younger patients. Also, the risk of dying in the month after carotid artery stenting varied to a ...

    Read more

     

  • Cardio Notes: Xarelto for Seniors, Carotid Stenting Death
    MedPage Today, 9 June 2014

    Rivaroxaban (Xarelto) matched warfarin in both older and younger patients. Also, the risk of dying in the month after carotid artery stenting varied to a ...

    Read more

     

  • ROCKET AF Substudy: Rivaroxaban as Good as Warfarin in Elderly Patients
    TCTMD, 9 June 2014

    Regardless of their age, patients with nonvalvular atrial fibrillation (A-fib) obtain similar safety and efficacy with rivaroxaban as they do with warfarin.

    Read more

     

  • ROCKET AF Substudy: Rivaroxaban as Good as Warfarin in Elderly Patients
    TCTMD, 9 June 2014

    Regardless of their age, patients with nonvalvular atrial fibrillation (A-fib) obtain similar safety and efficacy with rivaroxaban as they do with warfarin.

    Read more

     

  • New link found between air quality and health issues
    International Environmental Technology, 5 June 2014

    It was revealed that short periods of high air pollution can result in arrhythmia - abnormal heart rhythm - and blood clots in the lungs. It was found that ...

    Read more

     

  • New link found between air quality and health issues
    International Environmental Technology, 5 June 2014

    It was revealed that short periods of high air pollution can result in arrhythmia - abnormal heart rhythm - and blood clots in the lungs. It was found that ...

    Read more

     

  • Antiplatelet and Anticoagulation Therapy for Acute Coronary Syndromes
    Circulation Research, 7 June 2014

    This review will outline the data supporting various antiplatelet and anticoagulant therapies and their combinations in patients with acute coronary ...

    Read more

     

  • Antiplatelet and Anticoagulation Therapy for Acute Coronary Syndromes
    Circulation Research, 7 June 2014

    This review will outline the data supporting various antiplatelet and anticoagulant therapies and their combinations in patients with acute coronary ...

    Read more

     

  • Age 75+ No Bar to Rivaroxaban Benefit vs Warfarin: ROCKET-AF
    Medscape, 7 June 2014

    ... for stroke, the prespecified analysis suggests, "factor Xa inhibition with rivaroxaban is as effective as adjusted-dose anticoagulation with warfarin.

    Read more

     

  • Age 75+ No Bar to Rivaroxaban Benefit vs Warfarin: ROCKET-AF
    Medscape, 7 June 2014

    ... for stroke, the prespecified analysis suggests, "factor Xa inhibition with rivaroxaban is as effective as adjusted-dose anticoagulation with warfarin.

    Read more

     

  • Benefit party planned for Billy the Biker
    Times Herald-Record, 4 June 2014

    Six months later was a heart ablation to treat his atrial fibrillation. Last June, he fell and tore three of the five tendons in his shoulder. Three days before ...

    Read more

     

  • Benefit party planned for Billy the Biker
    Times Herald-Record, 4 June 2014

    Six months later was a heart ablation to treat his atrial fibrillation. Last June, he fell and tore three of the five tendons in his shoulder. Three days before ...

    Read more

     

  • New medical procedure reduces strokes, boosts medical tourism
    ActionNews

    Not only was she diagnosed with atrial fibrillation, an irregular heart rate that causes poor blood flow to the body, but she wasn't eligible to take blood ...

    Read more

     

  • New medical procedure reduces strokes, boosts medical tourism
    ActionNews

    Not only was she diagnosed with atrial fibrillation, an irregular heart rate that causes poor blood flow to the body, but she wasn't eligible to take blood ...

    Read more

     

  • Checking pulse could save your life, says top Havering doctor
    Romford Recorder, 4 June 2014

    To mark Heart Rhythm Week (June 2-8), a top doctor has urged residents to keep tabs on their heart rate, which should be between 60-100 beats per ...

    Read more

     

  • Checking pulse could save your life, says top Havering doctor
    Romford Recorder, 4 June 2014

    To mark Heart Rhythm Week (June 2-8), a top doctor has urged residents to keep tabs on their heart rate, which should be between 60-100 beats per ...

    Read more

     

  • Abstract
    America Hear Association Journal, 4 June 2014

    Atrial Fibrillation, Stroke, and Anticoagulation in Medicare Beneficiaries: ... trials of warfarin for stroke prevention in nonvalvular atrial fibrillation (AF).

    Read more

     

  • Abstract
    America Hear Association Journal, 4 June 2014

    Atrial Fibrillation, Stroke, and Anticoagulation in Medicare Beneficiaries: ... trials of warfarin for stroke prevention in nonvalvular atrial fibrillation (AF).

    Read more

     

  • 6,000 living with a heart timebomb
    Bradford Telegraph, 4 June 2014

    ... clinical commissioning groups across the district living with the potential ticking timebomb of atrial fibrillation, a condition that triggers abnormalities ...

    Read more

     

  • 6,000 living with a heart timebomb
    Bradford Telegraph, 4 June 2014

    ... clinical commissioning groups across the district living with the potential ticking timebomb of atrial fibrillation, a condition that triggers abnormalities ...

    Read more

     

  • Newly slim Chris Powell backs national heart campaign
    Dorset Echo, 4 June 2014

    THIS week is Heart Rhythm Week and many people, like Chris Powell, suffer with Atrial Fibrillation (AF). Members of NHS Dorset CCG will join ...

    Read more

     

  • Newly slim Chris Powell backs national heart campaign
    Dorset Echo, 4 June 2014

    THIS week is Heart Rhythm Week and many people, like Chris Powell, suffer with Atrial Fibrillation (AF). Members of NHS Dorset CCG will join ...

    Read more

     

  • Warfarin vs. Rivaroxaban for Nonvalvular AF
    Monthly Prescribing Reference, 4 June 2014

    Rivaroxaban and warfarin have similar efficacy and safety rates in treating nonvalvular atrial fibrillation (AF), although elderly patients do have higher ...

    Read more

     

  • Warfarin vs. Rivaroxaban for Nonvalvular AF
    Monthly Prescribing Reference, 4 June 2014

    Rivaroxaban and warfarin have similar efficacy and safety rates in treating nonvalvular atrial fibrillation (AF), although elderly patients do have higher ...

    Read more

     

  • Doctors hail dramatic reduction in strokes
    Yorkshire Post, 1 June 2014

    GPs in Bradford, Airedale, Wharfedale and Craven say more than 6,000 patients live with the ticking timebomb of atrial fibrillation (AF) in their area.

    Read more

     

  • Doctors hail dramatic reduction in strokes
    Yorkshire Post, 1 June 2014

    GPs in Bradford, Airedale, Wharfedale and Craven say more than 6,000 patients live with the ticking timebomb of atrial fibrillation (AF) in their area.

    Read more

     

  • Know your pulse – it only takes one minute
    Newhamccg.NHS, 29 May 2014

    GPs from NHS Newham Clinical Commissioning Group (CCG) are saying to local people: ‘know your pulse- it only takes one minute’ 

    Read more

     

  • Know your pulse – it only takes one minute
    Newhamccg.NHS, 29 May 2014

    GPs from NHS Newham Clinical Commissioning Group (CCG) are saying to local people: ‘know your pulse- it only takes one minute’ 

    Read more

     

  • Doctors want Newham residents to get to know their pulse
    Newhamrecorder, 29 May 2014

    Newham GPs are urging residents to get to know their pulse and lead a healthy lifestyle.

    Read more

     

  • Doctors want Newham residents to get to know their pulse
    Newhamrecorder, 29 May 2014

    Newham GPs are urging residents to get to know their pulse and lead a healthy lifestyle.

    Read more

     

  • Quality in Care (QiC) Anticoagulation 2014
    QiC, 22 May 2014

    Learn more about this exciting new awards programme for anticoagulation supported by AF Association and Arrhythmia Alliance

    Read more

     

  • Quality in Care (QiC) Anticoagulation 2014
    QiC, 22 May 2014

    Learn more about this exciting new awards programme for anticoagulation supported by AF Association and Arrhythmia Alliance

    Read more

     

  • Heart Rhythm Week 2014
    aaaw, 21 May 2014

    Atrial Fibrillation Association is proud to be supporting sister charity Arrhythmia Alliance in World Heart Rhythm Week from 2-8 June 2014.
                                
    Help us save lives: one of the simplest things you can do to support us in celebrating Ten Years of Innovation and Advancement in Arrhythmia Patient Care is by signing up to Arrhythmia Alliance’s Thunderclap event. Please click here to donate a Tweet, Facebook or Tumblr update on the morning of Monday 2 June to mark the start of the week.

    To download and share resources, or for more ideas on how you can get involved, visit the dedicated Heart Rhythm Week website >more

    Read more

     

  • Heart Rhythm Week 2014
    aaaw, 21 May 2014

    Atrial Fibrillation Association is proud to be supporting sister charity Arrhythmia Alliance in World Heart Rhythm Week from 2-8 June 2014.
                                
    Help us save lives: one of the simplest things you can do to support us in celebrating Ten Years of Innovation and Advancement in Arrhythmia Patient Care is by signing up to Arrhythmia Alliance’s Thunderclap event. Please click here to donate a Tweet, Facebook or Tumblr update on the morning of Monday 2 June to mark the start of the week.

    To download and share resources, or for more ideas on how you can get involved, visit the dedicated Heart Rhythm Week website >more

    Read more

     

  • Hospitalizations and health care costs for atrial fibrillation 'on the rise'
    Medical News Today, 20 May 2014

    According to the American Heart Association (AHA), atrial fibrillation (AF) is the most common serious heart abnormality in individuals over the age of ...

    Read more

     

  • Hospitalizations and health care costs for atrial fibrillation 'on the rise'
    Medical News Today, 20 May 2014

    According to the American Heart Association (AHA), atrial fibrillation (AF) is the most common serious heart abnormality in individuals over the age of ...

    Read more

     

  • Atrial Fibrillation: Risk of Dementia with Non-Therapeutic Levels of Anticoagulation
    Medical Research News and Interviews_ MedicalResearch.com, 19 May 2014

    Atrial fibrillation patients treated with warfarin anticoagulation that have lower percentages of time in therapeutic range have significantly higher ...

    Read more

     

  • Atrial Fibrillation: Risk of Dementia with Non-Therapeutic Levels of Anticoagulation
    Medical Research News and Interviews_ MedicalResearch.com, 19 May 2014

    Atrial fibrillation patients treated with warfarin anticoagulation that have lower percentages of time in therapeutic range have significantly higher ...

    Read more

     

  • Exercising too much is just as risky for your heart as too little
    MedCity News, 19 May 2014

    One was a series of comments on my Is Atrial fibrillation Necessary post on theHeart.org. The post describes the fact that lifestyle factors, not bad luck, ...

    Read more

     

  • Exercising too much is just as risky for your heart as too little
    MedCity News, 19 May 2014

    One was a series of comments on my Is Atrial fibrillation Necessary post on theHeart.org. The post describes the fact that lifestyle factors, not bad luck, ...

    Read more

     

  • A tradition of research continues in Danbury
    Newstimes.com, 17 May 2014

    Earlier research has studied a link between sleep apnea and the risk of stroke. What happens to those risk factors if you add atrial fibrillation -- a rapid, ...

    Read more

     

  • A tradition of research continues in Danbury
    Newstimes.com, 17 May 2014

    Earlier research has studied a link between sleep apnea and the risk of stroke. What happens to those risk factors if you add atrial fibrillation -- a rapid, ...

    Read more

     

  • HARMONY: Ranolazine, dronedarone combination reduced AF burden
    Healio, 17 May 2014

    SAN FRANCISCO — A combination of ranolazine and dronedarone reduced atrial fibrillation burden better than either alone in patients with ...

    Read more

     

  • HARMONY: Ranolazine, dronedarone combination reduced AF burden
    Healio, 17 May 2014

    SAN FRANCISCO — A combination of ranolazine and dronedarone reduced atrial fibrillation burden better than either alone in patients with ...

    Read more

     

  • Atrial Fibrillation: Risk With Intense Exercise Varies by Age
    MedicalResearch.com, 17 May 2014

    Dr. Nikola Drca: We found that intense physical activity like leisure-time exercise of more than five hours per week at the age of 30 increased the risk of ...

    Read more

     

  • Atrial Fibrillation: Risk With Intense Exercise Varies by Age
    MedicalResearch.com, 17 May 2014

    Dr. Nikola Drca: We found that intense physical activity like leisure-time exercise of more than five hours per week at the age of 30 increased the risk of ...

    Read more

     

  • Take Action to Prevent Stroke
    St Louis American, 15 May 2014

    A heart rhythm problem called atrial fibrillation and this risk is present in both genders, but because women tend to outlive men, there are more ...

    Read more

     

  • Take Action to Prevent Stroke
    St Louis American, 15 May 2014

    A heart rhythm problem called atrial fibrillation and this risk is present in both genders, but because women tend to outlive men, there are more ...

    Read more

     

  • Too Much Exercise May Be Harmful to Your Health
    The Wall Street Journal , 15 May 2014

    The second study adds to already substantial evidence that endurance exercise increases the risk of atrial fibrillation, a generally non-life-threatening ...

    Read more

     

  • Too Much Exercise May Be Harmful to Your Health
    The Wall Street Journal , 15 May 2014

    The second study adds to already substantial evidence that endurance exercise increases the risk of atrial fibrillation, a generally non-life-threatening ...

    Read more

     

  • Reducing the progression of persistent AF by 58%
    Todays Medical Developments, 15 May 2014

    Results from the MINERVA (MINimizERight Ventricular pacing to prevent Atrial fibrillation and heart failure) Study found that the Reactive ATP ...

    Read more

     

  • Reducing the progression of persistent AF by 58%
    Todays Medical Developments, 15 May 2014

    Results from the MINERVA (MINimizERight Ventricular pacing to prevent Atrial fibrillation and heart failure) Study found that the Reactive ATP ...

    Read more

     

  • Athens Regional celebrates A-fib Awareness Day, spreads awareness about A-fib and stroke
    Online Athens, 15 May 2014

    Athens Regional Medical Center joined a handful of major hospitals throughout the state Wednesday to celebrate Georgia House Resolution 1717, ...

    Read more

     

  • Athens Regional celebrates A-fib Awareness Day, spreads awareness about A-fib and stroke
    Online Athens, 15 May 2014

    Athens Regional Medical Center joined a handful of major hospitals throughout the state Wednesday to celebrate Georgia House Resolution 1717, ...

    Read more

     

  • New research finds positive correlation between bariatric surgery and reduced risk of atrial fibrillation
    News-Medical.net, 9 May 2014

    New research has found that bariatric surgery is an effective way to control weight in morbidly obese patients who are at risk for developing atrial ...

    Read more

     

  • New research finds positive correlation between bariatric surgery and reduced risk of atrial fibrillation
    News-Medical.net, 9 May 2014

    New research has found that bariatric surgery is an effective way to control weight in morbidly obese patients who are at risk for developing atrial ...

    Read more

     

  • Researchers identify heart-specific form of protein that protects against irregular heartbeats
    News-Medical.net, 19 May 2014

    Researchers at the Cedars-Sinai Heart Institute have identified a heart-specific form of a protein, BIN1, responsible for sculpting tiny folds in pockets ...

    Read more

     

  • Researchers identify heart-specific form of protein that protects against irregular heartbeats
    News-Medical.net, 19 May 2014

    Researchers at the Cedars-Sinai Heart Institute have identified a heart-specific form of a protein, BIN1, responsible for sculpting tiny folds in pockets ...

    Read more

     

  • Boost for Shipston charity singled out by agency
    Cotswold Journal, 14 May 2014

    Nicola Winn, managing director of Creative Bridge and Jo Jerrome, deputy CEO of Arrhythmia Alliance. A SHIPSTON charity's lifesaving work has ...

    Read more

     

  • Boost for Shipston charity singled out by agency
    Cotswold Journal, 14 May 2014

    Nicola Winn, managing director of Creative Bridge and Jo Jerrome, deputy CEO of Arrhythmia Alliance. A SHIPSTON charity's lifesaving work has ...

    Read more

     

  • Portola Pharmaceuticals Begins Enrollment in Phase 3 Study of FDA-Designated Breakthrough Therapy Andexanet Alfa and Factor Xa Inhibitor XARELTO(R)
    MarketWatch, 13 May 2014

    with Bayer HealthCare and Janssen Pharmaceuticals Inc.'s Factor Xa inhibitor XARELTO® (rivaroxaban). Portola is developing andexanet alfa, ...

    Read more

     

  • Portola Pharmaceuticals Begins Enrollment in Phase 3 Study of FDA-Designated Breakthrough Therapy Andexanet Alfa and Factor Xa Inhibitor XARELTO(R)
    MarketWatch, 13 May 2014

    with Bayer HealthCare and Janssen Pharmaceuticals Inc.'s Factor Xa inhibitor XARELTO® (rivaroxaban). Portola is developing andexanet alfa, ...

    Read more

     

  • New registry data highlight substantial global differences in stroke prevention for patients with an irregular heart beat
    Money Life, 7 May 2014

    ... substantial regional differences in how patients with an irregular heart beat (atrial fibrillation, or AF) were treated with stroke prevention medicines.

    Read more

     

  • New registry data highlight substantial global differences in stroke prevention for patients with an irregular heart beat
    Money Life, 7 May 2014

    ... substantial regional differences in how patients with an irregular heart beat (atrial fibrillation, or AF) were treated with stroke prevention medicines.

    Read more

     

  • 5th ECS Congress
    ECS.ae, 21 April 2014

    Save the Date! 5th ECS Congress - Dubai - 6 to 8 November 2014!

    Read more

     

  • 5th ECS Congress
    ECS.ae, 21 April 2014

    Save the Date! 5th ECS Congress - Dubai - 6 to 8 November 2014!

    Read more

     

  • New Hospital to be Built in Cambridge
    GOV.uk, 1 May 2014

    Papworth hospital, a leading specialist heart and lung hospital, will move from its current location outside Cambridge onto the Addenbrooke’s hospital site in the city.

    Read more

     

  • New Hospital to be Built in Cambridge
    GOV.uk, 1 May 2014

    Papworth hospital, a leading specialist heart and lung hospital, will move from its current location outside Cambridge onto the Addenbrooke’s hospital site in the city.

    Read more

     

  • General practice AF scheme could prevent 1,600 strokes a year
    gponline.com, 2 May 2014

    Around 1,600 strokes a year could be prevented if an East London programme that encouraged GPs to prescribe anticoagulants to more AF patients was rolled out across the UK, research suggests.

    Read more

     

  • General practice AF scheme could prevent 1,600 strokes a year
    gponline.com, 2 May 2014

    Around 1,600 strokes a year could be prevented if an East London programme that encouraged GPs to prescribe anticoagulants to more AF patients was rolled out across the UK, research suggests.

    Read more

     

  • Job vacancy: Arrhythmia Clinical Nurse Specialist
    jobs.nhs.uk, 1 May 2014

    Closing Date:
    23/05/2014

    An exciting Specialist Arrhythmia Nurse post has recently become available at the Bristol Heart Institute. We are looking for an enthusiastic nurse with relevant cardiology experience to work with the team within a dynamic and  rapidly expanding electrophysiology service. For further details please see the forthcoming advertisement on the NHS jobs website.

    Read more

     

  • Job vacancy: Arrhythmia Clinical Nurse Specialist
    jobs.nhs.uk, 1 May 2014

    Closing Date:
    23/05/2014

    An exciting Specialist Arrhythmia Nurse post has recently become available at the Bristol Heart Institute. We are looking for an enthusiastic nurse with relevant cardiology experience to work with the team within a dynamic and  rapidly expanding electrophysiology service. For further details please see the forthcoming advertisement on the NHS jobs website.

    Read more

     

  • Boehringer Ingelheim receives CHMP backing for new Pradaxa indication
    Zenopa, 29 April 2014

    The European Medicines Agency committee has issued a positive opinion recommending approval of Pradaxa (dabigatran etexilate) in the treatment ...

    Read more

     

  • Boehringer Ingelheim receives CHMP backing for new Pradaxa indication
    Zenopa, 29 April 2014

    The European Medicines Agency committee has issued a positive opinion recommending approval of Pradaxa (dabigatran etexilate) in the treatment ...

    Read more

     

  • ROCKET AF Substudy: Rivaroxaban Safe, Effective in East Asian Patients
    tctmd.com, 29 April 2014

    Patients of East Asian descent reap the same stroke-prevention benefit from rivaroxaban as others with nonvalvular atrial fibrillation (A-fib), according ...

    Read more

     

  • ROCKET AF Substudy: Rivaroxaban Safe, Effective in East Asian Patients
    tctmd.com, 29 April 2014

    Patients of East Asian descent reap the same stroke-prevention benefit from rivaroxaban as others with nonvalvular atrial fibrillation (A-fib), according ...

    Read more

     

  • Retain Warfarin During AF Ablation for Fewer Strokes
    Medscape, 24 April 2014

    DALLAS, TX — Maintaining warfarin anticoagulation is safer than interrupting it for catheter-ablation procedures for atrial fibrillation, concludes a ...

    Read more

     

  • Retain Warfarin During AF Ablation for Fewer Strokes
    Medscape, 24 April 2014

    DALLAS, TX — Maintaining warfarin anticoagulation is safer than interrupting it for catheter-ablation procedures for atrial fibrillation, concludes a ...

    Read more

     

  • Evaluation of pneumatic nebulization and ns-laser ablation ICP-MS for bulk elemental analysis and 2-dimensional element mapping of iron meteorites
    rsc.org, 22 April 2014

    The capabilities and limitations of nanosecond laser ablation ICP – mass spectrometry for bulk and spatially resolved (elemental mapping) analysis of ...

    Read more

     

  • Evaluation of pneumatic nebulization and ns-laser ablation ICP-MS for bulk elemental analysis and 2-dimensional element mapping of iron meteorites
    rsc.org, 22 April 2014

    The capabilities and limitations of nanosecond laser ablation ICP – mass spectrometry for bulk and spatially resolved (elemental mapping) analysis of ...

    Read more

     

  • Periprocedural Management of New Oral Anticoagulants in Patients Undergoing Atrial Fibrillation Ablation
    ahajournals.org, 24 April 2014

    She was started on dabigatran (150 mg twice daily) for stroke prevention; her creatinine clearance was calculated at 92 ml/min. AF ablation has been …

    Read more

     

  • Periprocedural Management of New Oral Anticoagulants in Patients Undergoing Atrial Fibrillation Ablation
    ahajournals.org, 24 April 2014

    She was started on dabigatran (150 mg twice daily) for stroke prevention; her creatinine clearance was calculated at 92 ml/min. AF ablation has been …

    Read more

     

  • Hologic's NovaSure System Reaches a Significant Milestone: Over Two Million Women Have Chosen the NovaSure Procedure to Address the Problem of Heavy Periods
    The Wall Street Journal , 29 April 2014

    "NovaSure is the global market leader in endometrial ablation because it ... ablation time of 90 seconds and maximum ablation time of two minutes.

    Read more

     

  • Hologic's NovaSure System Reaches a Significant Milestone: Over Two Million Women Have Chosen the NovaSure Procedure to Address the Problem of Heavy Periods
    The Wall Street Journal , 29 April 2014

    "NovaSure is the global market leader in endometrial ablation because it ... ablation time of 90 seconds and maximum ablation time of two minutes.

    Read more

     

  • NICE seeking shared learning examples to support AF Guideline Update
    AF Association, April 2014

    NICE Implementation Adviser co-ordinating the implementation needs assessment for the forthcoming update on the NICE clinical guideline on Atrial Fibrillation is seeking examples of existing models of practice for the following major implementation issues:

    • Under-diagnosis of Atrial Fibrillation
    • Stroke risk assessment: ensuring this happens and the implementation of the updated stroke risk score CHA2DS2-VASc and new recommendation for bleeding risk (HAS-BLED score).
       

    Anticoagulation:

    • Offering anticoagulation to people with a CHA2DS2-VASc score of 2 or above, taking bleeding risk into account.
    • Existing under-prescribing of any anticoagulation
    • Restriction of access to NOACs


    If you have shared learning examples to demonstrate where guideline recommendations have been successfully implemented, please email Heather.Stephens@nice.org.uk by 10 May 2014 or contact jo@afa.org.uk

    Read more

     

  • NICE seeking shared learning examples to support AF Guideline Update
    AF Association, April 2014

    NICE Implementation Adviser co-ordinating the implementation needs assessment for the forthcoming update on the NICE clinical guideline on Atrial Fibrillation is seeking examples of existing models of practice for the following major implementation issues:

    • Under-diagnosis of Atrial Fibrillation
    • Stroke risk assessment: ensuring this happens and the implementation of the updated stroke risk score CHA2DS2-VASc and new recommendation for bleeding risk (HAS-BLED score).
       

    Anticoagulation:

    • Offering anticoagulation to people with a CHA2DS2-VASc score of 2 or above, taking bleeding risk into account.
    • Existing under-prescribing of any anticoagulation
    • Restriction of access to NOACs


    If you have shared learning examples to demonstrate where guideline recommendations have been successfully implemented, please email Heather.Stephens@nice.org.uk by 10 May 2014 or contact jo@afa.org.uk

    Read more

     

  • Symposium Featuring CardioFocus HeartLight® Endoscopic Ablation System at 80th Annual German Cardiac Society Meeting
    digitaljournal.com, 22 April 2014

    MARLBOROUGH, Mass., April 21, 2014 /PRNewswire/ -- CardioFocus, Inc., developer of the HeartLight® Endoscopic Ablation System for the …

    Read more

     

  • Symposium Featuring CardioFocus HeartLight® Endoscopic Ablation System at 80th Annual German Cardiac Society Meeting
    digitaljournal.com, 22 April 2014

    MARLBOROUGH, Mass., April 21, 2014 /PRNewswire/ -- CardioFocus, Inc., developer of the HeartLight® Endoscopic Ablation System for the …

    Read more

     

  • Relationship Between Time in Therapeutic Range and Comparative Treatment Effect of Rivaroxaban and Warfarin: Results From the ROCKET AF Trial
    ahajournals.org, 22 April 2014

    Background Time in therapeutic range (TTR) is a standard quality measure of the use of warfarin. We assessed the relative effects of rivaroxaban ...

    Read more

     

  • Relationship Between Time in Therapeutic Range and Comparative Treatment Effect of Rivaroxaban and Warfarin: Results From the ROCKET AF Trial
    ahajournals.org, 22 April 2014

    Background Time in therapeutic range (TTR) is a standard quality measure of the use of warfarin. We assessed the relative effects of rivaroxaban ...

    Read more

     

  • Pradaxa, Xarelto, Eliquis: NOACs' Reversal a Key?
    medpagetoday.com, 22 April 2014

    Kowey said 6 million people in the U.S. are on outpatient anticoagulants, and last year 200,000 people (one in 30) were admitted to the hospital for ...

    Read more

     

  • Pradaxa, Xarelto, Eliquis: NOACs' Reversal a Key?
    medpagetoday.com, 22 April 2014

    Kowey said 6 million people in the U.S. are on outpatient anticoagulants, and last year 200,000 people (one in 30) were admitted to the hospital for ...

    Read more

     

  • ROCKET AF analysis isolates predictors of intracranial hemorrhage in A-fib population
    tctmd.com, 22 April 2014

    Patients with atrial fibrillation (A-fib) randomized to receive the direct factor Xa inhibitor rivaroxaban instead of warfarin and those with a history of ...

    Read more

     

  • ROCKET AF analysis isolates predictors of intracranial hemorrhage in A-fib population
    tctmd.com, 22 April 2014

    Patients with atrial fibrillation (A-fib) randomized to receive the direct factor Xa inhibitor rivaroxaban instead of warfarin and those with a history of ...

    Read more

     

  • Millions of Britons could benefit from painkillers with no side-effects
    Express, 22 April 2014

    Atrial fibrillation, which some experts call the new epidemic in cardiovascular disease, increases the risk of heart failure three-fold and stroke five-fold.

    Read more

     

  • Millions of Britons could benefit from painkillers with no side-effects
    Express, 22 April 2014

    Atrial fibrillation, which some experts call the new epidemic in cardiovascular disease, increases the risk of heart failure three-fold and stroke five-fold.

    Read more

     

  • New procedure cuts stroke risk for those with AF
    pennlive.com, 20 April 2014

    Sandy Holmes heard a thud in the middle of the night and woke up to a sight no wife wants to see. Her husband, David, was slumped on the bathroom floor.

    Read more

     

  • New procedure cuts stroke risk for those with AF
    pennlive.com, 20 April 2014

    Sandy Holmes heard a thud in the middle of the night and woke up to a sight no wife wants to see. Her husband, David, was slumped on the bathroom floor.

    Read more

     

  • Infographic: ACSMA campaign, one year on
    ACSMA, 21 Mar 2014

    867 supporters, meetings held with policy makers and two letters of support from Rt Hon Jeremy Hunt MP, Secretary of State for Health. Learn more about the success of the Anticoagulation Self-Monitoring Alliance (ACSMA), one year on.

    Read more

     

  • Infographic: ACSMA campaign, one year on
    ACSMA, 21 Mar 2014

    867 supporters, meetings held with policy makers and two letters of support from Rt Hon Jeremy Hunt MP, Secretary of State for Health. Learn more about the success of the Anticoagulation Self-Monitoring Alliance (ACSMA), one year on.

    Read more

     

  • ESC webinar on Challenges in Stroke Prevention in Atrial Fibrillation 26 March 2014
    ESC Education, 18 Mar 2014

    <p><strong>On 26 March 2014 from 18:00 to 19:00 CET, join Felicita Andreotti and Joao Morais online for an interactive live webinar focusing on the latest ESC Clinical Guidelines on Atrial Fibrilation.</strong></p>

    Read more

     

  • ESC webinar on Challenges in Stroke Prevention in Atrial Fibrillation 26 March 2014
    ESC Education, 18 Mar 2014

    <p><strong>On 26 March 2014 from 18:00 to 19:00 CET, join Felicita Andreotti and Joao Morais online for an interactive live webinar focusing on the latest ESC Clinical Guidelines on Atrial Fibrilation.</strong></p>

    Read more

     

  • Anticoagulation with warfarin beneficial in patients with CKD
    Pulse, 7 Mar 2014

    <p>The benefits of anticoagulation with warfarin outweigh the risks in patients with chronic kidney disease, even for those with the most severe kidney damage, a Swedish study has found.</p>

    Read more

     

  • Anticoagulation with warfarin beneficial in patients with CKD
    Pulse, 7 Mar 2014

    <p>The benefits of anticoagulation with warfarin outweigh the risks in patients with chronic kidney disease, even for those with the most severe kidney damage, a Swedish study has found.</p>

    Read more

     

  • Coagulation Home Testing Improves Outcomes among Atrial Fibrillation Patients on Warfarin Therapy and Enhances Clinical Efficiency, According to New Study
    The Wall Street Journal, 6 Mar 2014

    <p>A global leader in empowering individuals to take greater control of their health at home by connecting innovative diagnostics in the hands of patients to their healthcare providers, today announced the results of a study demonstrating that at-home coagulation testing among atrial fibrillation patients receiving warfarin led to improved outcomes versus traditional self-testing management, as well as enhanced clinical efficiencies and reduced costs. Results of the study, which was supported by Alere, were published today in the current issue of the journal Nursing 2014.</p>

    Read more

     

  • Coagulation Home Testing Improves Outcomes among Atrial Fibrillation Patients on Warfarin Therapy and Enhances Clinical Efficiency, According to New Study
    The Wall Street Journal, 6 Mar 2014

    <p>A global leader in empowering individuals to take greater control of their health at home by connecting innovative diagnostics in the hands of patients to their healthcare providers, today announced the results of a study demonstrating that at-home coagulation testing among atrial fibrillation patients receiving warfarin led to improved outcomes versus traditional self-testing management, as well as enhanced clinical efficiencies and reduced costs. Results of the study, which was supported by Alere, were published today in the current issue of the journal Nursing 2014.</p>

    Read more

     

  • Data published correlating miR-150 to AF patients with Chronic Systolic HF
    The Wall Street Journal, 6 Mar 2014

    <p>Study Demonstrating microRNAs to Be Good Biomarkers for Heart Failure Complements Earlier Rosetta Published Study; Rosetta Advancing a microRNA-Based Assay in Heart Failure.</p>

    Read more

     

  • Data published correlating miR-150 to AF patients with Chronic Systolic HF
    The Wall Street Journal, 6 Mar 2014

    <p>Study Demonstrating microRNAs to Be Good Biomarkers for Heart Failure Complements Earlier Rosetta Published Study; Rosetta Advancing a microRNA-Based Assay in Heart Failure.</p>

    Read more

     

  • Xention and Servier announce a cardiovascular collaboration to further develop a selective Kv1.5 modulator for the treatment of atrial fibrillation
    News Release, 2 Oct 2014

    CAMBRIDGE, UK AND SURESNES, FRANCE – XENTION LTD ("Xention"), the Cambridge-based biopharmaceutical company specialising in the discovery and development of ion channel-modulating drugs for atrial fibrillation, and SERVIER, the leading independent French pharmaceutical company ("Servier") announced today that they had entered into a multi-year agreement for the development and commercialisation of XEN-D0103, a selective Kv1.5 modulator discovered and developed by Xention for the treatment of atrial fibrillation ("AF").

    Read more

     

  • Xention and Servier announce a cardiovascular collaboration to further develop a selective Kv1.5 modulator for the treatment of atrial fibrillation
    News Release, 2 Oct 2014

    CAMBRIDGE, UK AND SURESNES, FRANCE – XENTION LTD ("Xention"), the Cambridge-based biopharmaceutical company specialising in the discovery and development of ion channel-modulating drugs for atrial fibrillation, and SERVIER, the leading independent French pharmaceutical company ("Servier") announced today that they had entered into a multi-year agreement for the development and commercialisation of XEN-D0103, a selective Kv1.5 modulator discovered and developed by Xention for the treatment of atrial fibrillation ("AF").

    Read more

     

  • Acutus Medical Closes Series B Funding at $28 Million
    acutusmedical.com, 20 Aug 2013

    GE Ventures and OrbiMed join Index and Advent in the funding of Acutus Medical’s Novel Dipole Density Electrophysiology Mapping System, Generating CT/MRI Quality, Real-Time 3D Images of the Heart Chamber & Electrical Conduction

    Read more

     

  • Acutus Medical Closes Series B Funding at $28 Million
    acutusmedical.com, 20 Aug 2013

    GE Ventures and OrbiMed join Index and Advent in the funding of Acutus Medical’s Novel Dipole Density Electrophysiology Mapping System, Generating CT/MRI Quality, Real-Time 3D Images of the Heart Chamber & Electrical Conduction

    Read more

     

  • Dabigatran improves the efficacy of an elective direct current cardioversion service
    Medinews, Mar 2014

    Anticoagulation prior to direct current cardioversion (DCCV) is mandatory to reduce the risk of thromboembolism.

    Read more

     

  • Dabigatran improves the efficacy of an elective direct current cardioversion service
    Medinews, Mar 2014

    Anticoagulation prior to direct current cardioversion (DCCV) is mandatory to reduce the risk of thromboembolism.

    Read more

     

  • Artery Zapping Little Better Than Drugs In Atrial Fibrillation Patients
    Forbes, 20 Feb 2014

    <p>New trial offers scant support for earlier use of radio frequency ablation to treat atrial fibrillation.</p>

    Read more

     

  • Artery Zapping Little Better Than Drugs In Atrial Fibrillation Patients
    Forbes, 20 Feb 2014

    <p>New trial offers scant support for earlier use of radio frequency ablation to treat atrial fibrillation.</p>

    Read more

     

  • Anticoagulants prescribed more frequently in AF patients, underused in elderly
    healio.com, 16 Feb 2014

    The use of oral anticoagulation in patients with atrial fibrillation has increased in the past decade, but antiplatelet therapy remains common in this population, recent study data suggest.

    Read more

     

  • Anticoagulants prescribed more frequently in AF patients, underused in elderly
    healio.com, 16 Feb 2014

    The use of oral anticoagulation in patients with atrial fibrillation has increased in the past decade, but antiplatelet therapy remains common in this population, recent study data suggest.

    Read more

     

  • Drug therapy saving patients from stroke devastation
    Yorkshire Post, 10 Feb 2014

    A ground-breaking project led by doctors in Yorkshire has cut the number of people suffering devastating strokes.

    Read more

     

  • Drug therapy saving patients from stroke devastation
    Yorkshire Post, 10 Feb 2014

    A ground-breaking project led by doctors in Yorkshire has cut the number of people suffering devastating strokes.

    Read more

     

  • NICE issues draft guidance on coagulation testing device
    Nursing Times.net, 10 Feb 2014

    The National Institute for Health and Care Excellence has published recommendations for self-monitoring the clotting of blood in people on long-term anticoagulation therapy.

    Read more

     

  • NICE issues draft guidance on coagulation testing device
    Nursing Times.net, 10 Feb 2014

    The National Institute for Health and Care Excellence has published recommendations for self-monitoring the clotting of blood in people on long-term anticoagulation therapy.

    Read more

     

  • Patients with atrial fibrillation ‘at risk' from outdated aspirin prescribing practice
    pulsetoday.co.uk, 30 Jan 2014

    Aspirin is still being widely prescribed to patients with atrial fibrillation when it offers no benefit and may even be harmful, a leading UK expert on stroke prevention has warned.

    Read more

     

  • Patients with atrial fibrillation ‘at risk' from outdated aspirin prescribing practice
    pulsetoday.co.uk, 30 Jan 2014

    Aspirin is still being widely prescribed to patients with atrial fibrillation when it offers no benefit and may even be harmful, a leading UK expert on stroke prevention has warned.

    Read more

     

  • Striking Global Differences in AF in ER: RE-LY Registry
    Medscape Multispeciality, 30 Jan 2014

    This study highlights areas where treatment could be improved. For example, even in North America, there were large variations in the use of oral anticoagulants to prevent stroke, and time in the therapeutic range was "poor."

    Read more

     

  • Striking Global Differences in AF in ER: RE-LY Registry
    Medscape Multispeciality, 30 Jan 2014

    This study highlights areas where treatment could be improved. For example, even in North America, there were large variations in the use of oral anticoagulants to prevent stroke, and time in the therapeutic range was "poor."

    Read more

     

  • Cryoballoon versus RF Ablation in Paroxysmal Atrial Fibrillation
    medscape.com, 28 Jan 2014

    Since ablation techniques and strategies in ablation therapy of px AF vary considerably among EP centers, a comparison of the cryoballoon approach with RF ablation in px AF patients was addressed in this analysis of the German ablation registry, introduced in January 2007.

    Read more

     

  • Cryoballoon versus RF Ablation in Paroxysmal Atrial Fibrillation
    medscape.com, 28 Jan 2014

    Since ablation techniques and strategies in ablation therapy of px AF vary considerably among EP centers, a comparison of the cryoballoon approach with RF ablation in px AF patients was addressed in this analysis of the German ablation registry, introduced in January 2007.

    Read more

     

  • NICE urges GPs to adopt latest risk scores for assessing stroke risk in atrial fibrillation
    pulsetoday.co.uk, 15 Jan 2014

    GPs should routinely assess patients with atrial fibrillation using the CHA2DS2-VASc and HAS-BLED risk scores to guide decisions on anticoagulation prescribing, according to new recommendations put forward by NICE.

    Read more

     

  • NICE urges GPs to adopt latest risk scores for assessing stroke risk in atrial fibrillation
    pulsetoday.co.uk, 15 Jan 2014

    GPs should routinely assess patients with atrial fibrillation using the CHA2DS2-VASc and HAS-BLED risk scores to guide decisions on anticoagulation prescribing, according to new recommendations put forward by NICE.

    Read more

     

  • Draft NICE guidance on AF out for consultation
    NICE, January 2014

    The draft guideline is out for consultation with stakeholders. If you wish to comment, you need to do so via one of the registered stakeholder organisations listed, by the deadline shown.

    Read more

     

  • Draft NICE guidance on AF out for consultation
    NICE, January 2014

    The draft guideline is out for consultation with stakeholders. If you wish to comment, you need to do so via one of the registered stakeholder organisations listed, by the deadline shown.

    Read more

     

  • Statement: Response to updated NICE guidelines on the diagnosis and management of atrial fibrillation
    AF Association, 15 Jan 2014

    The AF Association welcomes the long awaited publication of the updated NICE AF Guideline for consultation, endorsing the need to improve detection and protection of the most common heart rhythm disorder, atrial fibrillation (AF).

    Read more

     

  • Statement: Response to updated NICE guidelines on the diagnosis and management of atrial fibrillation
    AF Association, 15 Jan 2014

    The AF Association welcomes the long awaited publication of the updated NICE AF Guideline for consultation, endorsing the need to improve detection and protection of the most common heart rhythm disorder, atrial fibrillation (AF).

    Read more

     

  • Novel Patch Detects More AF Events than Holter Monitor
    8 Jan 2014

    The novel Zio patch (iRhythm Technologies, San Francisco, CA), worn for 14 days, outperformed a conventional Holter monitor worn for 24 hours, in a study of patients who underwent ambulatory ECG monitoring to detect suspected cardiac arrhythmia.

    Read more

     

  • Novel Patch Detects More AF Events than Holter Monitor
    8 Jan 2014

    The novel Zio patch (iRhythm Technologies, San Francisco, CA), worn for 14 days, outperformed a conventional Holter monitor worn for 24 hours, in a study of patients who underwent ambulatory ECG monitoring to detect suspected cardiac arrhythmia.

    Read more

     

  • Dabigatran Under the FDA's Watchful Eye
    8 Jan 2014

    The US Food and Drug Administration is requesting input from the public on a proposed study that will assess safety outcomes in adults with atrial fibrillation who recently started treated with dabigatran etexilate (Pradaxa, Boehringer Ingelheim) or warfarin.

    Read more

     

  • Dabigatran Under the FDA's Watchful Eye
    8 Jan 2014

    The US Food and Drug Administration is requesting input from the public on a proposed study that will assess safety outcomes in adults with atrial fibrillation who recently started treated with dabigatran etexilate (Pradaxa, Boehringer Ingelheim) or warfarin.

    Read more

     

  • NIH awards Houston Methodist $3.5 million to study potential cure for atrial fibrillation
    chron.com, 27 Dec 2013

    The National Institutes of Health awarded Houston Methodist West Hospital $3.5 million to search for a potential cure for atrial fibrillation.

    Read more

     

  • NIH awards Houston Methodist $3.5 million to study potential cure for atrial fibrillation
    chron.com, 27 Dec 2013

    The National Institutes of Health awarded Houston Methodist West Hospital $3.5 million to search for a potential cure for atrial fibrillation.

    Read more

     

  • Atrial fibrillation is a 'growing global health problem,' WHO says
    medicalnewstoday.com, 23 Dec 2013

    A World Health Organization study reveals atrial fibrillation is the most common condition leading to an irregular heartbeat, and it is a serious global health problem that is growing.

     

    Read more

     

  • Atrial fibrillation is a 'growing global health problem,' WHO says
    medicalnewstoday.com, 23 Dec 2013

    A World Health Organization study reveals atrial fibrillation is the most common condition leading to an irregular heartbeat, and it is a serious global health problem that is growing.

     

    Read more

     

  • Warfarin for patients with AF: early effects on ischaemic strokes
    BHJ, 19 Dec 2013

    Patients initiating warfarin may be at an increased risk of stroke during the first 30 days of treatment, supporting the biological plausibility of a transient hypercoagulable state at the start of the treatment, although additional studies are needed to confirm these findings.

    Read more

     

  • Warfarin for patients with AF: early effects on ischaemic strokes
    BHJ, 19 Dec 2013

    Patients initiating warfarin may be at an increased risk of stroke during the first 30 days of treatment, supporting the biological plausibility of a transient hypercoagulable state at the start of the treatment, although additional studies are needed to confirm these findings.

    Read more

     

  • Watchman AF Device Wins FDA Panel Nod
    MedScape, 11 Dec 2013

    A panel of FDA advisers gave strong backing to an implantable device that's an alternative to blood-thinners in preventing strokes in patients with atrial fibrillation -- an endorsement that comes three years after the FDA rejected the Watchman device.

    The FDA's Circulatory System Devices Panel voted 13-1 Wednesday to recommend marketing approval for the Watchman transcatheter left atrial appendage closure device to prevent stroke or systemic embolism in patients with nonvalvular atrial fibrillation.

    Read more

     

  • Watchman AF Device Wins FDA Panel Nod
    MedScape, 11 Dec 2013

    A panel of FDA advisers gave strong backing to an implantable device that's an alternative to blood-thinners in preventing strokes in patients with atrial fibrillation -- an endorsement that comes three years after the FDA rejected the Watchman device.

    The FDA's Circulatory System Devices Panel voted 13-1 Wednesday to recommend marketing approval for the Watchman transcatheter left atrial appendage closure device to prevent stroke or systemic embolism in patients with nonvalvular atrial fibrillation.

    Read more

     

  • Future for NOACs in light of ENGAGE-AF
    MedScape, 10 Dec 2013

    Watch this video, which discusses findings from ENGAGE-AF and what this could mean for the future of novel oral anticoagulants.

    Read more

     

  • Future for NOACs in light of ENGAGE-AF
    MedScape, 10 Dec 2013

    Watch this video, which discusses findings from ENGAGE-AF and what this could mean for the future of novel oral anticoagulants.

    Read more

     

  • Rivaroxaban bleed risk scrutinised in ROCKET-AF
    MedScape, 9 Dec 2013

    The risk of major bleeding in ROCKET AF , overall and by age, was about same in the two groups of patients with nonvalvular atrial fibrillation (AF) who had been randomised to warfarin or rivaroxaban (Xarelto, Bayer Pharma/Janssen Pharmaceuticals), a new analysis suggests.

    Read more

     

  • Rivaroxaban bleed risk scrutinised in ROCKET-AF
    MedScape, 9 Dec 2013

    The risk of major bleeding in ROCKET AF , overall and by age, was about same in the two groups of patients with nonvalvular atrial fibrillation (AF) who had been randomised to warfarin or rivaroxaban (Xarelto, Bayer Pharma/Janssen Pharmaceuticals), a new analysis suggests.

    Read more

     

  • FDA looks again at anti-stroke device
    Fox News, 9 Dec 2013

    U.S. Food and Drug Administration staff reviewing data on Boston Scientific Corp's novel anti-stroke device highlighted the implant's failure to meet a key goal for effectiveness in a recent study but said on Monday that other data must be weighed in deciding whether it should be approved.

    Read more

     

  • FDA looks again at anti-stroke device
    Fox News, 9 Dec 2013

    U.S. Food and Drug Administration staff reviewing data on Boston Scientific Corp's novel anti-stroke device highlighted the implant's failure to meet a key goal for effectiveness in a recent study but said on Monday that other data must be weighed in deciding whether it should be approved.

    Read more

     

  • NOACs stroke-protection benefits compared to wafarin
    MedScape, 5 Dec 2013

    Collectively, four new oral anticoagulants (NOACs) protect against stroke or systemic embolism better than warfarin and compare favourably on safety in patients with atrial fibrillation (AF), concludes a meta-analysis of four big randomised trials, all major showcases for the agents' potential value in AF.

    "NOAC" in the current analysis meant four warfarin alternatives that are already available or seem headed for approval in AF: the direct thrombin inhibitor dabigatran (Pradaxa, Boehringer Ingelheim) and factor Xa inhibitors rivaroxaban (Xarelto, Bayer Pharma/Janssen Pharmaceuticals), apixaban (Eliquis, Pfizer/Bristol-Myers Squibb), and edoxaban (Lixiana, Daiichi-Sankyo).

    Read more

     

  • NOACs stroke-protection benefits compared to wafarin
    MedScape, 5 Dec 2013

    Collectively, four new oral anticoagulants (NOACs) protect against stroke or systemic embolism better than warfarin and compare favourably on safety in patients with atrial fibrillation (AF), concludes a meta-analysis of four big randomised trials, all major showcases for the agents' potential value in AF.

    "NOAC" in the current analysis meant four warfarin alternatives that are already available or seem headed for approval in AF: the direct thrombin inhibitor dabigatran (Pradaxa, Boehringer Ingelheim) and factor Xa inhibitors rivaroxaban (Xarelto, Bayer Pharma/Janssen Pharmaceuticals), apixaban (Eliquis, Pfizer/Bristol-Myers Squibb), and edoxaban (Lixiana, Daiichi-Sankyo).

    Read more

     

  • Premature atrial contraction count improves AF risk model
    MedScape, 4 Dec 2013

    Knowing the number of hourly premature atrial contractions (PACs) a patient has is as good as the Framingham atrial fibrillation (AF) risk algorithm in predicting five- to 15-year risk of AF, researchers report.

    Read more

     

  • Premature atrial contraction count improves AF risk model
    MedScape, 4 Dec 2013

    Knowing the number of hourly premature atrial contractions (PACs) a patient has is as good as the Framingham atrial fibrillation (AF) risk algorithm in predicting five- to 15-year risk of AF, researchers report.

    Read more

     

  • Predicting the quality of anticoagulation during warfarin therapy
    G. Boriani, Nov 2013

    The clinical relevance of this article is enhanced, at this time, by the availability of NOACs that are effective and safe, but costly. In this perspective, identification of those patients who are unlikely (or likely) to maintain INR at range during treatment with VKAs could better recognize the patients to be candidates for NOACs as first priority. This approach can be justified because prediction of a poor TTR has clinically important implications, such as increased risk of bleeding, stroke, and mortality during warfarin treatment and an improved cost-effectiveness profile of NOACs.

    Read more

     

  • Predicting the quality of anticoagulation during warfarin therapy
    G. Boriani, Nov 2013

    The clinical relevance of this article is enhanced, at this time, by the availability of NOACs that are effective and safe, but costly. In this perspective, identification of those patients who are unlikely (or likely) to maintain INR at range during treatment with VKAs could better recognize the patients to be candidates for NOACs as first priority. This approach can be justified because prediction of a poor TTR has clinically important implications, such as increased risk of bleeding, stroke, and mortality during warfarin treatment and an improved cost-effectiveness profile of NOACs.

    Read more

     

  • Factors affecting quality of anticoagulation control in AF patients on warfarin
    S. Apostolakis et al, Nov 2013

    When oral anticoagulation with adjusted-dose vitamin K antagonist (VKA) is used, the quality of anticoagulation control (as reflected by the time in therapeutic range [TTR] of the international normalized ratio [INR]) is an important determinant of thromboembolism and bleeding. The objective of this study was to derive a validated scheme using patient-related clinical parameters to assess the likelihood of poor INR control among patients with atrial fibrillation (AF) on VKA therapy.

    Read more

     

  • Factors affecting quality of anticoagulation control in AF patients on warfarin
    S. Apostolakis et al, Nov 2013

    When oral anticoagulation with adjusted-dose vitamin K antagonist (VKA) is used, the quality of anticoagulation control (as reflected by the time in therapeutic range [TTR] of the international normalized ratio [INR]) is an important determinant of thromboembolism and bleeding. The objective of this study was to derive a validated scheme using patient-related clinical parameters to assess the likelihood of poor INR control among patients with atrial fibrillation (AF) on VKA therapy.

    Read more

     

  • GARFIELD study - ESCC highlights
    BJC, Nov 2013

    Specialist consultant registrar, Henry Oluwasefunmi Savage from Royal Brompton Hospital in London discusses international longitudinal registry of patients with atrial fibrillation at stroke risk: Global Anticoagulant Registry in the FIELD (GARFIELD).

    Read more

     

  • GARFIELD study - ESCC highlights
    BJC, Nov 2013

    Specialist consultant registrar, Henry Oluwasefunmi Savage from Royal Brompton Hospital in London discusses international longitudinal registry of patients with atrial fibrillation at stroke risk: Global Anticoagulant Registry in the FIELD (GARFIELD).

    Read more

     

  • A specific antidote for dabigatran
    NCBI, 4 Dec 2013

    Dabigatran etexilate is a direct thrombin inhibitor and used widely as an anticoagulant for the prevention of stroke in patients with atrial fibrillation. However, anticoagulation therapy can be associated with an increased risk of bleeding. Researchers present data on the identification, humanisation, and in vitro pharmacology of an antidote for dabigatran (aDabi-Fab).

    Read more

     

  • A specific antidote for dabigatran
    NCBI, 4 Dec 2013

    Dabigatran etexilate is a direct thrombin inhibitor and used widely as an anticoagulant for the prevention of stroke in patients with atrial fibrillation. However, anticoagulation therapy can be associated with an increased risk of bleeding. Researchers present data on the identification, humanisation, and in vitro pharmacology of an antidote for dabigatran (aDabi-Fab).

    Read more

     

  • Third of UK unaware of AF stroke risk
    AF Association, 25 Nov 2013

    One in three adults is unaware of the high stroke risk caused by the most common heart rhythm disorder; atrial fibrillation (AF). By the age of 40, we have a 25% lifetime chance of getting the condition, with a possible five-fold increased risk of stroke.

    The results of a recent public survey by AF Association have highlighted the lack of understanding of AF-related stroke, which can be treated to significantly reduce this risk. Following these results, as part of AF Aware Week (24-30 November 2013), the charity is calling for detection and protection in AF to be a healthcare priority.

    Read more

     

  • Third of UK unaware of AF stroke risk
    AF Association, 25 Nov 2013

    One in three adults is unaware of the high stroke risk caused by the most common heart rhythm disorder; atrial fibrillation (AF). By the age of 40, we have a 25% lifetime chance of getting the condition, with a possible five-fold increased risk of stroke.

    The results of a recent public survey by AF Association have highlighted the lack of understanding of AF-related stroke, which can be treated to significantly reduce this risk. Following these results, as part of AF Aware Week (24-30 November 2013), the charity is calling for detection and protection in AF to be a healthcare priority.

    Read more

     

  • Focus on AF
    BJCN, November 2013

    The AF Association provides support and information for healthcare professionals, lobbies for service improvement and aims to raise international awareness of this common condition.

    The British Journal of Cardiac Nursing focuses on AF Association, it's key campaigns and achievements.

    Read more

     

  • Focus on AF
    BJCN, November 2013

    The AF Association provides support and information for healthcare professionals, lobbies for service improvement and aims to raise international awareness of this common condition.

    The British Journal of Cardiac Nursing focuses on AF Association, it's key campaigns and achievements.

    Read more

     

  • Update from consultation on Independence and mental wellbeing for older people
    NICE, 27 Nov 2013

    The National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) has been asked by the Department of Health (DH) to develop guidance on public health interventions aimed at promoting the mental wellbeing and independence of older people.

    This guidance will support a number of related policy documents including:

    • ‘A public health outcomes framework for England 2013–2016’ [Parts 1A and 2] (DH 2012)
    • ‘Ageing Well, an asset based approach’ (Office for Public Management/Local Government Association 2012)
    • 'Care and support Bill’ (UKParliament 2013)
    • ‘Eligibility for adult social care’ (DH 2010)
    • ‘Eligibility for adult social care’ [discussion paper] (DH 2013)
    • ‘Mental capital’ (Government Office for Science/Foresight 2008)
    • ‘No health without mental health: a cross-government mental health outcomes strategy for people of all ages’ HM Government2011)
    • ‘Preparing for our ageing society’ (Department for Work and Pensions 2008)
    • Independence and mental wellbeing for older people–final scope 2 of 12
    • ‘Preventing suicide in England: a cross government outcomes strategy to save lives’ (HM Government 2012)
    • ‘Public Health England: our priorities for 2013/14’ (PHE 2013)
    • ‘Strategy and action plan for healthy ageing in Europe, 2012–2020’ (World Health Organization 2012)
    • ‘The adult social care outcomes framework 2013–14’ (DH 2012).

     

    This guidance will provide recommendations for good practice, based on the best available evidence of effectiveness, including cost effectiveness. It is aimed at commissioners, managers and practitioners with public health as part of their remit. They could be working in the NHS, local authorities and the wider public, private, voluntary and community sectors. It will also be of interest to older people, their carers, family, friends, community and other members of the public.

    Background information

    Read more

     

  • Update from consultation on Independence and mental wellbeing for older people
    NICE, 27 Nov 2013

    The National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) has been asked by the Department of Health (DH) to develop guidance on public health interventions aimed at promoting the mental wellbeing and independence of older people.

    This guidance will support a number of related policy documents including:

    • ‘A public health outcomes framework for England 2013–2016’ [Parts 1A and 2] (DH 2012)
    • ‘Ageing Well, an asset based approach’ (Office for Public Management/Local Government Association 2012)
    • 'Care and support Bill’ (UKParliament 2013)
    • ‘Eligibility for adult social care’ (DH 2010)
    • ‘Eligibility for adult social care’ [discussion paper] (DH 2013)
    • ‘Mental capital’ (Government Office for Science/Foresight 2008)
    • ‘No health without mental health: a cross-government mental health outcomes strategy for people of all ages’ HM Government2011)
    • ‘Preparing for our ageing society’ (Department for Work and Pensions 2008)
    • Independence and mental wellbeing for older people–final scope 2 of 12
    • ‘Preventing suicide in England: a cross government outcomes strategy to save lives’ (HM Government 2012)
    • ‘Public Health England: our priorities for 2013/14’ (PHE 2013)
    • ‘Strategy and action plan for healthy ageing in Europe, 2012–2020’ (World Health Organization 2012)
    • ‘The adult social care outcomes framework 2013–14’ (DH 2012).

     

    This guidance will provide recommendations for good practice, based on the best available evidence of effectiveness, including cost effectiveness. It is aimed at commissioners, managers and practitioners with public health as part of their remit. They could be working in the NHS, local authorities and the wider public, private, voluntary and community sectors. It will also be of interest to older people, their carers, family, friends, community and other members of the public.

    Background information

    Read more

     

  • Weight loss decreases AF burden, severity
    MedScape, 25 Nov 2013

    Weight loss combined with close management of hypertension and other risk factors results in fewer atrial fibrillation (AF) events and less symptom burden in highly symptomatic patients with AF vs risk factor management alone, a new study shows.

    The new findings are important because no previous studies have shown that risk factor management has a beneficial effect on AF, and so current guidelines don't include this approach, said study author Prashanthan Sanders, PhD, professor, cardiology, and director, Center of Heart Rhythm Disorders, University of Adelaide, Australia.

    "Weight and risk factor management should be a normal part of managing a person with atrial fibrillation," he told Medscape Medical News. Along with obesity and hypertension, diabetes mellitus and obstructive sleep apnea are other independent risk markers for AF.

    The study was published in the November 20 Cardiology/Cardiovascular Disease–themed issue of JAMA.

    NB. You will be asked to register to the free website to access the remainder of this article.

    Read more

     

  • Weight loss decreases AF burden, severity
    MedScape, 25 Nov 2013

    Weight loss combined with close management of hypertension and other risk factors results in fewer atrial fibrillation (AF) events and less symptom burden in highly symptomatic patients with AF vs risk factor management alone, a new study shows.

    The new findings are important because no previous studies have shown that risk factor management has a beneficial effect on AF, and so current guidelines don't include this approach, said study author Prashanthan Sanders, PhD, professor, cardiology, and director, Center of Heart Rhythm Disorders, University of Adelaide, Australia.

    "Weight and risk factor management should be a normal part of managing a person with atrial fibrillation," he told Medscape Medical News. Along with obesity and hypertension, diabetes mellitus and obstructive sleep apnea are other independent risk markers for AF.

    The study was published in the November 20 Cardiology/Cardiovascular Disease–themed issue of JAMA.

    NB. You will be asked to register to the free website to access the remainder of this article.

    Read more

     

  • Global trials for Pradaxa
    Pharmabiz, 21 Nov 2013

    Boehringer Ingelheim has planned to start two large, global clinical trials of Pradaxa (dabigatran etexilate) evaluating its efficacy and safety in stroke prevention therapy in two clinically highly relevant conditions.

    The RE-SPECT ESUS trial will investigate the efficacy and safety of Pradaxa in patients whose first stroke was of embolic origin with unknown source (ESUS). Embolic strokes occur when a blood clot forms somewhere in the body and travels through the bloodstream to the brain.

    The RE-DUAL PCI trial will evaluate the efficacy and safety of Pradaxa in patients with non-valvular atrial fibrillation (NVAF) who have undergone percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI), also known as angioplasty, with stenting.

    Read more

     

  • Global trials for Pradaxa
    Pharmabiz, 21 Nov 2013

    Boehringer Ingelheim has planned to start two large, global clinical trials of Pradaxa (dabigatran etexilate) evaluating its efficacy and safety in stroke prevention therapy in two clinically highly relevant conditions.

    The RE-SPECT ESUS trial will investigate the efficacy and safety of Pradaxa in patients whose first stroke was of embolic origin with unknown source (ESUS). Embolic strokes occur when a blood clot forms somewhere in the body and travels through the bloodstream to the brain.

    The RE-DUAL PCI trial will evaluate the efficacy and safety of Pradaxa in patients with non-valvular atrial fibrillation (NVAF) who have undergone percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI), also known as angioplasty, with stenting.

    Read more

     

  • Treament of atrial flutter: Less may be more?
    MedScape, 22 Nov 2013

    A  65-year-old man with a history of obesity and hypertension complains of sustained tachycardia, fatigue, and exertional dyspnea for the past week. The 12-lead ECG shows typical atrial flutter (AFl) with a ventricular rate of 120 bpm. Last year, he had intermittent self-terminating palpitations. A 30-day event monitor showed paroxysmal atrial fibrillation. Moderate-dose propafenone relieved his symptoms until this recent episode of atrial flutter. Stress testing showed no ischemia, and echocardiography revealed only mild left atrial dilation. He takes warfarin, propafenone, lisinopril, and metoprolol and sleeps with a CPAP machine.

    What is the best treatment approach for this common problem? Is it 1) ablate the AFl and continue medical treatment for AF, or 2) ablate both AFl and AF in the index procedure?

    Multiple abstracts on the last day of the American Heart Association 2013 Sessions shed light on this everyday scenario.

    Read more

     

  • Treament of atrial flutter: Less may be more?
    MedScape, 22 Nov 2013

    A  65-year-old man with a history of obesity and hypertension complains of sustained tachycardia, fatigue, and exertional dyspnea for the past week. The 12-lead ECG shows typical atrial flutter (AFl) with a ventricular rate of 120 bpm. Last year, he had intermittent self-terminating palpitations. A 30-day event monitor showed paroxysmal atrial fibrillation. Moderate-dose propafenone relieved his symptoms until this recent episode of atrial flutter. Stress testing showed no ischemia, and echocardiography revealed only mild left atrial dilation. He takes warfarin, propafenone, lisinopril, and metoprolol and sleeps with a CPAP machine.

    What is the best treatment approach for this common problem? Is it 1) ablate the AFl and continue medical treatment for AF, or 2) ablate both AFl and AF in the index procedure?

    Multiple abstracts on the last day of the American Heart Association 2013 Sessions shed light on this everyday scenario.

    Read more

     

  • Smart pacing cuts AF risk
    MedPage, 20 Nov 2013

    A pacemaker set to pace only when and where needed improved patient outcomes, particularly the risk of permanent atrial fibrillation, a trial showed.

    The sophisticated predictive, right-ventricle sparing programming was associated with a 26% reduction in risk of death from any cause, cardiovascular-related hospitalization, or permanent afib compared with standard dual-chamber pacing (P=0.04), Giuseppe Boriani, MD, PhD, of the University of Bologna, Italy, and colleagues found.

    NB. You will be asked to register to access this free website

    Read more

     

  • Smart pacing cuts AF risk
    MedPage, 20 Nov 2013

    A pacemaker set to pace only when and where needed improved patient outcomes, particularly the risk of permanent atrial fibrillation, a trial showed.

    The sophisticated predictive, right-ventricle sparing programming was associated with a 26% reduction in risk of death from any cause, cardiovascular-related hospitalization, or permanent afib compared with standard dual-chamber pacing (P=0.04), Giuseppe Boriani, MD, PhD, of the University of Bologna, Italy, and colleagues found.

    NB. You will be asked to register to access this free website

    Read more

     

  • Daiichi blood thinner safer, as effective as warfarin: study
    Reuters UK, 19 Nov 2013

    A new blood clot and stroke preventer from Daiichi Sankyo proved as effective and safer than widely used warfarin in a large, late stage trial of patients with atrial fibrillation, paving the way for it to compete with other new warfarin alternatives on the market.

    Read more

     

  • Daiichi blood thinner safer, as effective as warfarin: study
    Reuters UK, 19 Nov 2013

    A new blood clot and stroke preventer from Daiichi Sankyo proved as effective and safer than widely used warfarin in a large, late stage trial of patients with atrial fibrillation, paving the way for it to compete with other new warfarin alternatives on the market.

    Read more

     

  • RADAR-AF: Trial summary
    American College of Cardiology, 19 Nov 2013

    The goal of the trial was to evaluate treatment with high-frequency source ablation compared with circumferential pulmonary vein isolation among patients with symptomatic drug-refractory atrial fibrillation (AF).

    Read more

     

  • RADAR-AF: Trial summary
    American College of Cardiology, 19 Nov 2013

    The goal of the trial was to evaluate treatment with high-frequency source ablation compared with circumferential pulmonary vein isolation among patients with symptomatic drug-refractory atrial fibrillation (AF).

    Read more

     

  • ENGAGE AF-TIMI 48: Edoxaban with warfarin in AF patients
    American College of Cardiology, 19 Nov 2013

    The largest-ever clinical trial of a novel anticoagulant found that edoxaban, a direct oral factor Xa inhibitor, was noninferior to warfarin for stroke prevention in patients with atrial fibrillation. Edoxaban also reduced the risk of bleeding and cardiovascular-related mortality compared to warfarin, according to results of the ENGAGE AF-TIMI 48 Trial, presented Nov. 19 as part of AHA 2013, and published simultaneously in the New England Journal of Medicine.

    Read more

     

  • ENGAGE AF-TIMI 48: Edoxaban with warfarin in AF patients
    American College of Cardiology, 19 Nov 2013

    The largest-ever clinical trial of a novel anticoagulant found that edoxaban, a direct oral factor Xa inhibitor, was noninferior to warfarin for stroke prevention in patients with atrial fibrillation. Edoxaban also reduced the risk of bleeding and cardiovascular-related mortality compared to warfarin, according to results of the ENGAGE AF-TIMI 48 Trial, presented Nov. 19 as part of AHA 2013, and published simultaneously in the New England Journal of Medicine.

    Read more

     

  • EU-PACT: Genotype-guided dosing of warfarin vs. standard dosing
    American College of Cardiology, 19 Nov 2013

    Genotype-based dosing at the initiation of warfarin therapy was found to be superior to standard dosing, and "was associated with a higher percentage of time in the therapeutic international normalized ratio (INR) range," according to results of the EU-PACT study, presented Nov. 19 as part of AHA 2013, and published simultaneously in the New England Journal of Medicine.

    Read more

     

  • EU-PACT: Genotype-guided dosing of warfarin vs. standard dosing
    American College of Cardiology, 19 Nov 2013

    Genotype-based dosing at the initiation of warfarin therapy was found to be superior to standard dosing, and "was associated with a higher percentage of time in the therapeutic international normalized ratio (INR) range," according to results of the EU-PACT study, presented Nov. 19 as part of AHA 2013, and published simultaneously in the New England Journal of Medicine.

    Read more

     

  • COAG: Trial summary
    American College of Cardiology, 19 Nov 2013

    Although warfarin remains the most commonly used agent for anticoagulation, it has a narrow therapeutic index, with wide variation among patients in the daily doses required. Although a number of factors are responsible, pharmacogenomic studies have identified that two genes, CYP2C9 (cytochrome p450 isoform) and VKORC1 (vitamin K epoxide reductase complex subunit 1), account for a large portion of this variability. The current trial sought to study the efficacy of genotype-guided dosing of warfarin compared with standard management in patients requiring warfarin.

    Read more

     

  • COAG: Trial summary
    American College of Cardiology, 19 Nov 2013

    Although warfarin remains the most commonly used agent for anticoagulation, it has a narrow therapeutic index, with wide variation among patients in the daily doses required. Although a number of factors are responsible, pharmacogenomic studies have identified that two genes, CYP2C9 (cytochrome p450 isoform) and VKORC1 (vitamin K epoxide reductase complex subunit 1), account for a large portion of this variability. The current trial sought to study the efficacy of genotype-guided dosing of warfarin compared with standard management in patients requiring warfarin.

    Read more

     

  • Data from first phase I study of antidote for Pradaxa® (dabigatran)
    Digital Journal, 18 Nov 2013

    Data indicate the antidote may be able to achieve immediate, complete and sustained reversal of dabigatran-induced anticoagulation in healthy humans

    Boehringer Ingelheim Pharmaceuticals, Inc. today announced results showing that its investigational fully humanized antibody fragment (Fab) rapidly reversed the anticoagulation effect of dabigatran in healthy male volunteers. These results, presented today during the American Heart Association's Scientific Sessions 2013, represent the first clinical data involving the compound, which was discovered and developed by the company.

    Read more

     

  • Data from first phase I study of antidote for Pradaxa® (dabigatran)
    Digital Journal, 18 Nov 2013

    Data indicate the antidote may be able to achieve immediate, complete and sustained reversal of dabigatran-induced anticoagulation in healthy humans

    Boehringer Ingelheim Pharmaceuticals, Inc. today announced results showing that its investigational fully humanized antibody fragment (Fab) rapidly reversed the anticoagulation effect of dabigatran in healthy male volunteers. These results, presented today during the American Heart Association's Scientific Sessions 2013, represent the first clinical data involving the compound, which was discovered and developed by the company.

    Read more

     

  • New efficacy and safety data for dabigatran to be announced
    Cardiac Rhythm News, 12 Nov 2013

    Boehringer Ingelheim has announced the upcoming presentation of the latest efficacy and safety data for the novel oral anticoagulant dabigatran etexilate (Pradaxa) at the 2013 American Heart Association’s (AHA) Scientific Sessions (16–20 November, Dallas, USA).

    The company announced that data from eight presentations sponsored by Boehringer Ingelheim are included in the scientific programme.

    Read more

     

  • New efficacy and safety data for dabigatran to be announced
    Cardiac Rhythm News, 12 Nov 2013

    Boehringer Ingelheim has announced the upcoming presentation of the latest efficacy and safety data for the novel oral anticoagulant dabigatran etexilate (Pradaxa) at the 2013 American Heart Association’s (AHA) Scientific Sessions (16–20 November, Dallas, USA).

    The company announced that data from eight presentations sponsored by Boehringer Ingelheim are included in the scientific programme.

    Read more

     

  • AF may increase risk of MI
    MedPage, 4 November 2013

    Although myocardial infarction is a known risk factor for the development of atrial fibrillation, the relationship might work the other way around, too, researchers found.

    Among patients without a history of coronary heart disease, those with atrial fibrillation were 70% more likely to have an MI through an average of about 7 years of follow-up after accounting for other potential risk factors (HR 1.70, 95% CI 1.26-2.30), according to Elsayed Soliman, MD, of Wake Forest School of Medicine in Winston-Salem, N.C., and colleagues.

    That risk was greatest among women (HR 2.16, 95% CI 1.41-3.31) and black individuals (HR 2.53, 95% CI 1.67-3.86), they reported online in JAMA Internal Medicine.

    Read more

     

  • AF may increase risk of MI
    MedPage, 4 November 2013

    Although myocardial infarction is a known risk factor for the development of atrial fibrillation, the relationship might work the other way around, too, researchers found.

    Among patients without a history of coronary heart disease, those with atrial fibrillation were 70% more likely to have an MI through an average of about 7 years of follow-up after accounting for other potential risk factors (HR 1.70, 95% CI 1.26-2.30), according to Elsayed Soliman, MD, of Wake Forest School of Medicine in Winston-Salem, N.C., and colleagues.

    That risk was greatest among women (HR 2.16, 95% CI 1.41-3.31) and black individuals (HR 2.53, 95% CI 1.67-3.86), they reported online in JAMA Internal Medicine.

    Read more

     

  • Novel anticoagulant prescriptions on the rise among elderly in Canada
    Cardiology Today, 27 October 2013

    Prescriptions for novel oral anticoagulants in Canada have increased rapidly since their approval for the treatment of atrial fibrillation, particularly among patients aged 85 years or older, according to a recent report.

    Researchers performed a time-series analysis of prescriptions of dabigatran (Pradaxa, Boehringer Ingelheim), rivaroxaban (Xarelto, Janssen Pharmaceuticals) and warfarin between October 2010 and September 2012 among patients in Ontario aged 20 years or older. Data on dabigatran prescriptions were stratified according to age, and the proportion administered to patients aged older than 65 years was compared with that observed in the RE-LY study.

    Read more

     

  • Novel anticoagulant prescriptions on the rise among elderly in Canada
    Cardiology Today, 27 October 2013

    Prescriptions for novel oral anticoagulants in Canada have increased rapidly since their approval for the treatment of atrial fibrillation, particularly among patients aged 85 years or older, according to a recent report.

    Researchers performed a time-series analysis of prescriptions of dabigatran (Pradaxa, Boehringer Ingelheim), rivaroxaban (Xarelto, Janssen Pharmaceuticals) and warfarin between October 2010 and September 2012 among patients in Ontario aged 20 years or older. Data on dabigatran prescriptions were stratified according to age, and the proportion administered to patients aged older than 65 years was compared with that observed in the RE-LY study.

    Read more

     

  • Dabigatran MI risk is class effect for oral direct thrombin inhibitors in meta-analysis
    MedScape, 25 Oct 2013

    Treatment with oral direct thrombin inhibitors, including dabigatran etexilate (Pradaxa, Boehringer Ingelheim), appears to raise the risk of MI, according to a pair of meta-analyses published recently in the American Journal of Cardiology.

    Read more

     

  • Dabigatran MI risk is class effect for oral direct thrombin inhibitors in meta-analysis
    MedScape, 25 Oct 2013

    Treatment with oral direct thrombin inhibitors, including dabigatran etexilate (Pradaxa, Boehringer Ingelheim), appears to raise the risk of MI, according to a pair of meta-analyses published recently in the American Journal of Cardiology.

    Read more

     

  • Stroke numbers up worldwide
    MedPage Today, 23 Oct 2013

    The overall burden of stroke in terms of absolute numbers of people affected around the world is growing, especially in younger age groups and in low-to-middle-income countries, a global study showed.

    In 2010, there were 16.9 million people who had a first stroke, 33 million stroke survivors, and 5.9 million people who died from a stroke -- increases of 68%, 84%, and 26% respectively since 1990, according to Valery Feigin, MD, of the Auckland University of Technology in New Zealand, and colleagues.

    In addition, 102 million disability-adjusted life years (DALYs) were lost, up 12%, the researchers reported online in The Lancet.

    Read more

     

  • Stroke numbers up worldwide
    MedPage Today, 23 Oct 2013

    The overall burden of stroke in terms of absolute numbers of people affected around the world is growing, especially in younger age groups and in low-to-middle-income countries, a global study showed.

    In 2010, there were 16.9 million people who had a first stroke, 33 million stroke survivors, and 5.9 million people who died from a stroke -- increases of 68%, 84%, and 26% respectively since 1990, according to Valery Feigin, MD, of the Auckland University of Technology in New Zealand, and colleagues.

    In addition, 102 million disability-adjusted life years (DALYs) were lost, up 12%, the researchers reported online in The Lancet.

    Read more

     

  • Is warfarin 'dead'?
    Heartwire, 21 Oct 2013

    In a debate at the Canadian Cardiovascular Congress (CCC) 2013 entitled "Is warfarin dead for stroke prevention in atrial fibrillation (AF)?" the take-home message was that warfarin is still alive and well—largely because a significant number of patients do not qualify for the newer, expensive oral anticoagulants.

    Dr Paul Dorian (University of Toronto, ON) contended that warfarin is an effective rat poison but is obsolete for preventing stroke in AF. Dr L Brent Mitchell (University of Calgary, AB) argued that warfarin is the appropriate choice for stroke prevention in many patients with AF, so warfarin is not "dead."

    Cochair Dr Jafna Cox (Dalhousie University, Halifax, NS) said he "thought it was a foregone conclusion that the novel oral anticoagulants were so clearly going to trump warfarin," but Mitchell showed that a significant number of patients do not qualify for the newer agents.

    Please note - you will be prompted to sign in to access heartwire.

    Read more

     

  • Is warfarin 'dead'?
    Heartwire, 21 Oct 2013

    In a debate at the Canadian Cardiovascular Congress (CCC) 2013 entitled "Is warfarin dead for stroke prevention in atrial fibrillation (AF)?" the take-home message was that warfarin is still alive and well—largely because a significant number of patients do not qualify for the newer, expensive oral anticoagulants.

    Dr Paul Dorian (University of Toronto, ON) contended that warfarin is an effective rat poison but is obsolete for preventing stroke in AF. Dr L Brent Mitchell (University of Calgary, AB) argued that warfarin is the appropriate choice for stroke prevention in many patients with AF, so warfarin is not "dead."

    Cochair Dr Jafna Cox (Dalhousie University, Halifax, NS) said he "thought it was a foregone conclusion that the novel oral anticoagulants were so clearly going to trump warfarin," but Mitchell showed that a significant number of patients do not qualify for the newer agents.

    Please note - you will be prompted to sign in to access heartwire.

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  • EINSTEIN-PE: Rivaroxaban associated with cost savings, reduced LOS
    Healio, 21 October 2013

    Treatment of pulmonary embolism with rivaroxaban was associated with cost savings of more than $2,000 per patient compared with treatment with enoxaparin plus warfarin, according to new findings from the EINSTEIN-PE study.

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  • EINSTEIN-PE: Rivaroxaban associated with cost savings, reduced LOS
    Healio, 21 October 2013

    Treatment of pulmonary embolism with rivaroxaban was associated with cost savings of more than $2,000 per patient compared with treatment with enoxaparin plus warfarin, according to new findings from the EINSTEIN-PE study.

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  • How quickly do docs prescribe new AF drugs?
    MedPage, 18 October 2013

    Dabigatran (Pradaxa) was rapidly incorporated into everyday practice in Ontario (U.S.) in the two years after it was approved for preventing stroke associated with nonvalvular atrial fibrillation, particularly in the oldest patients, researchers found.

    From October 2010 -- when it was approved in both the U.S. and Canada -- to September 2012, the rate of monthly prescriptions for the drug increased from three to 274 per 100,000 people (P<0.001), according to Ana Johnson, PhD, of Queen's University in Kingston, Ontario, and colleagues.

    Dabigatran accounted for 17.2% of all prescriptions for oral anticoagulation by the end of the study period; warfarin accounted for 78.9% and rivaroxaban (Xarelto) -- which was not approved for patients with AF in Canada until January 2012 -- for 3.9% of prescriptions, they reported online in CMAJ Open.

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  • How quickly do docs prescribe new AF drugs?
    MedPage, 18 October 2013

    Dabigatran (Pradaxa) was rapidly incorporated into everyday practice in Ontario (U.S.) in the two years after it was approved for preventing stroke associated with nonvalvular atrial fibrillation, particularly in the oldest patients, researchers found.

    From October 2010 -- when it was approved in both the U.S. and Canada -- to September 2012, the rate of monthly prescriptions for the drug increased from three to 274 per 100,000 people (P<0.001), according to Ana Johnson, PhD, of Queen's University in Kingston, Ontario, and colleagues.

    Dabigatran accounted for 17.2% of all prescriptions for oral anticoagulation by the end of the study period; warfarin accounted for 78.9% and rivaroxaban (Xarelto) -- which was not approved for patients with AF in Canada until January 2012 -- for 3.9% of prescriptions, they reported online in CMAJ Open.

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  • Revalidation tool to attain QOF points and tackle myths in AF stroke
    AF Association, 16 October 2013

    A new e-learning tool to help GPs complete critical steps for revalidation is launched today at the National Association of Primary Care (NAPC) Best Practice meeting. Not only does the tool guide revalidation preparation, it also contributes to CPD and facilitates the achievement of QOF points for AF care.  Ultimately, helping ensure the best care for AF patients at risk of stroke.  Registration and use of the tool is free at www.af-revalidation.org.

    AF is the most powerful independent risk factor for stroke, associated with a five-fold increase in stroke rate.  Moreover, AF-related strokes are more severe, more disabling, more frequently fatal and are more expensive than non-AF related strokes. It is estimated that less than a quarter of AF patients in need of stroke risk reduction get adequate treatment.  This low rate highlights not just the large undiagnosed population but widespread ineffective treatment with aspirin and the challenges of maintaining safe and effective anticoagulation with warfarin in many patients.

    Over 15,000 strokes and 5,500 patient deaths would be prevented every year if UK AF patients were effectively identified and treated with oral anticoagulation.  Given that the lifetime risk of AF approaches 25%, and that that incidence is increasing annually, it is vital that GPs are equipped with the necessary knowledge and resources to reduce the massive burden that AF-stroke currently places on the health service and society.

    The core of the AF Revalidation tool is a video lecture series from Professor Gregory Lip that illustrates the importance of anticoagulation in AF patients.  One of its contributors, Dr Matthew Fay, a GPwaSI in cardiology introduced the tool,

    “In the learning section of the tool, Professor Lip delivers a series of devastating blows to the historical role that aspirin has had in AF patients.  Thereafter, the tool becomes a step-by-step guide to achieving practice improvement through audit whilst automatically documenting progress for inclusion in a revalidation portfolio.”

    AF presents an ideal subject for revalidation; the population is manageable and significant outcomes can be achieved following relatively modest interventions. The tool ensures maximum QOF points for risk stratification and risk reduction with anticoagulants.  Moreover, the tool automatically generates the documentation required by the revalidation process to demonstrate learning, reflection, audit and practice improvement.

    Delegates also heard how the current structure of the NHS can prevent GPs from delivering effective care.  Commenting on the barriers to care, Dr Charles Alessi, chairman of the NAPC said, 

    “As it stands, GPs are mandated to spend more budget that they receive on treatments that provide long-term benefit that is felt almost exclusively in secondary care.  Consequently, the broken arrangement of resourcing and reward are defying the cost-effectiveness conclusions of NICE.  The AF Revalidation Tool is an excellent example of how GPs can gain tangible benefit from a focus on outcomes and not just activity.”

    The AF Revalidation Tool was conceived and developed by the AF Association in partnership with AntiCoagulation Europe (ACE).  Eve Knight, chief executive of ACE added,

    “There are thousands of preventable strokes each year in the UK because of AF.  Oral anticoagulants hold the potential to reduce this number vastly.  It is vital that we put more effort into achieving appropriate anticoagulation in at-risk patients, and that AF patients on aspirin are reviewed and switched to anticoagulation.”
    Trudie Lobban MBE, chief executive of AF Association, said,

    “The GRASP-AF tool from NHS IQ provides a simple route to achieve effective identification of all patients who require treatment review for anticoagulation.  The AF Revalidation Tool takes this a step further, guiding use of GRASP-AF and illustrating how audit with GRASP-AF can fulfil vital criteria for GP revalidation and QOF points.

    The Tool will play a valuable educational role, dispelling the aspirin myth but it also delivers tangible benefits to GPs.  Registration and use of the tool are free at www.af-revalidation.org.”

    Read more

     

  • Revalidation tool to attain QOF points and tackle myths in AF stroke
    AF Association, 16 October 2013

    A new e-learning tool to help GPs complete critical steps for revalidation is launched today at the National Association of Primary Care (NAPC) Best Practice meeting. Not only does the tool guide revalidation preparation, it also contributes to CPD and facilitates the achievement of QOF points for AF care.  Ultimately, helping ensure the best care for AF patients at risk of stroke.  Registration and use of the tool is free at www.af-revalidation.org.

    AF is the most powerful independent risk factor for stroke, associated with a five-fold increase in stroke rate.  Moreover, AF-related strokes are more severe, more disabling, more frequently fatal and are more expensive than non-AF related strokes. It is estimated that less than a quarter of AF patients in need of stroke risk reduction get adequate treatment.  This low rate highlights not just the large undiagnosed population but widespread ineffective treatment with aspirin and the challenges of maintaining safe and effective anticoagulation with warfarin in many patients.

    Over 15,000 strokes and 5,500 patient deaths would be prevented every year if UK AF patients were effectively identified and treated with oral anticoagulation.  Given that the lifetime risk of AF approaches 25%, and that that incidence is increasing annually, it is vital that GPs are equipped with the necessary knowledge and resources to reduce the massive burden that AF-stroke currently places on the health service and society.

    The core of the AF Revalidation tool is a video lecture series from Professor Gregory Lip that illustrates the importance of anticoagulation in AF patients.  One of its contributors, Dr Matthew Fay, a GPwaSI in cardiology introduced the tool,

    “In the learning section of the tool, Professor Lip delivers a series of devastating blows to the historical role that aspirin has had in AF patients.  Thereafter, the tool becomes a step-by-step guide to achieving practice improvement through audit whilst automatically documenting progress for inclusion in a revalidation portfolio.”

    AF presents an ideal subject for revalidation; the population is manageable and significant outcomes can be achieved following relatively modest interventions. The tool ensures maximum QOF points for risk stratification and risk reduction with anticoagulants.  Moreover, the tool automatically generates the documentation required by the revalidation process to demonstrate learning, reflection, audit and practice improvement.

    Delegates also heard how the current structure of the NHS can prevent GPs from delivering effective care.  Commenting on the barriers to care, Dr Charles Alessi, chairman of the NAPC said, 

    “As it stands, GPs are mandated to spend more budget that they receive on treatments that provide long-term benefit that is felt almost exclusively in secondary care.  Consequently, the broken arrangement of resourcing and reward are defying the cost-effectiveness conclusions of NICE.  The AF Revalidation Tool is an excellent example of how GPs can gain tangible benefit from a focus on outcomes and not just activity.”

    The AF Revalidation Tool was conceived and developed by the AF Association in partnership with AntiCoagulation Europe (ACE).  Eve Knight, chief executive of ACE added,

    “There are thousands of preventable strokes each year in the UK because of AF.  Oral anticoagulants hold the potential to reduce this number vastly.  It is vital that we put more effort into achieving appropriate anticoagulation in at-risk patients, and that AF patients on aspirin are reviewed and switched to anticoagulation.”
    Trudie Lobban MBE, chief executive of AF Association, said,

    “The GRASP-AF tool from NHS IQ provides a simple route to achieve effective identification of all patients who require treatment review for anticoagulation.  The AF Revalidation Tool takes this a step further, guiding use of GRASP-AF and illustrating how audit with GRASP-AF can fulfil vital criteria for GP revalidation and QOF points.

    The Tool will play a valuable educational role, dispelling the aspirin myth but it also delivers tangible benefits to GPs.  Registration and use of the tool are free at www.af-revalidation.org.”

    Read more

     

  • Pediatric AF has risk of serious complications and high recurrence rates
    Elsevier, 7 Oct 2013

    Although it appears to be a rare disease in pediatric patients, lone AF does carry a substantial burden of symptoms and has a high recurrence rate. A study reported rate of recurrence of 39%. It concludes pediatric practice should be in alignment with published adult guidelines, and long-term follow-up studies and larger series of pediatric patients with lone AF are required to better understand the natural history.

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  • Pediatric AF has risk of serious complications and high recurrence rates
    Elsevier, 7 Oct 2013

    Although it appears to be a rare disease in pediatric patients, lone AF does carry a substantial burden of symptoms and has a high recurrence rate. A study reported rate of recurrence of 39%. It concludes pediatric practice should be in alignment with published adult guidelines, and long-term follow-up studies and larger series of pediatric patients with lone AF are required to better understand the natural history.

    Read more

     

  • Can warfarin alternatives fulfil their promise?
    Pulse Today, 1 Oct 2013

    The new oral anticoagulants were hailed as a breakthrough, but cost concerns and clinical uncertainty have curbed take-up. Alisdair Stirling reports

    The headlines were impressive. ‘£2.50 a day pill to beat stroke’. ‘First new anti-stroke treatment in 50 years’. Such was the coverage that greeted the first of several new oral anticoagulants (NOACs) to be approved by NICE last year.

    The hope was that they would leave warfarin for the rats, but the reality has been quite different. Prescribing data suggest the newer drugs are largely being reserved for patients who are unsuitable for warfarin, with CCG leaders complaining of ‘huge cost implications’.

    The latest blow is last month’s publication of data from the RE-ALIGN study, which was halted early because of an excess risk of bleeding in mechanical heart valve patients on dabigatran compared with warfarin. So where do all the conflicting messages on cost and safety leave GPs?

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  • Can warfarin alternatives fulfil their promise?
    Pulse Today, 1 Oct 2013

    The new oral anticoagulants were hailed as a breakthrough, but cost concerns and clinical uncertainty have curbed take-up. Alisdair Stirling reports

    The headlines were impressive. ‘£2.50 a day pill to beat stroke’. ‘First new anti-stroke treatment in 50 years’. Such was the coverage that greeted the first of several new oral anticoagulants (NOACs) to be approved by NICE last year.

    The hope was that they would leave warfarin for the rats, but the reality has been quite different. Prescribing data suggest the newer drugs are largely being reserved for patients who are unsuitable for warfarin, with CCG leaders complaining of ‘huge cost implications’.

    The latest blow is last month’s publication of data from the RE-ALIGN study, which was halted early because of an excess risk of bleeding in mechanical heart valve patients on dabigatran compared with warfarin. So where do all the conflicting messages on cost and safety leave GPs?

    Read more

     

  • EHRA publishes guide on NOACs in non-valvular AF
    European Heart Journal, Oct 2013

    New oral anticoagulants (NOACs) are an alternative for vitamin K antagonists (VKAs) to prevent stroke in patients with non-valvular atrial fibrillation (AF). Both physicians and patients will have to learn how to use these drugs effectively and safely in specific clinical situations. This text is an executive summary of a practical guide that the European Heart Rhythm Association (EHRA) has assembled to help physicians in the use of the different NOACs. The full text is being published in EP Europace. Practical answers have been formulated for 15 concrete clinical scenarios: (i) practical start-up and follow-up scheme for patients on NOACs; (ii) how to measure the anticoagulant effect of NOACs; (iii) drug–drug interactions and pharmacokinetics of NOACs; (iv) switching between anticoagulant regimens; (v) ensuring compliance of NOAC intake; (vi) how to deal with dosing errors; (vii) patients with chronic kidney disease; (viii) what to do if there is a (suspected) overdose without bleeding, or a clotting test is indicating a risk of bleeding?; (ix) management of bleeding complications; (x) patients undergoing a planned surgical intervention or ablation; (xi) patients undergoing an urgent surgical intervention; (xii) patients with AF and coronary artery disease; (xiii) cardioversion in a NOAC-treated patient; (xiv) patients presenting with acute stroke while on NOACs; (xv) NOACs vs. VKAs in AF patients with a malignancy. Since new information is becoming available at a rapid pace, an EHRA web site with the latest updated information accompanies the guide (www.NOACforAF.eu). It also contains links to the ESC AF Guidelines, a key message pocket booklet, print-ready files for a proposed universal NOAC anticoagulation card, and feedback possibilities.

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  • EHRA publishes guide on NOACs in non-valvular AF
    European Heart Journal, Oct 2013

    New oral anticoagulants (NOACs) are an alternative for vitamin K antagonists (VKAs) to prevent stroke in patients with non-valvular atrial fibrillation (AF). Both physicians and patients will have to learn how to use these drugs effectively and safely in specific clinical situations. This text is an executive summary of a practical guide that the European Heart Rhythm Association (EHRA) has assembled to help physicians in the use of the different NOACs. The full text is being published in EP Europace. Practical answers have been formulated for 15 concrete clinical scenarios: (i) practical start-up and follow-up scheme for patients on NOACs; (ii) how to measure the anticoagulant effect of NOACs; (iii) drug–drug interactions and pharmacokinetics of NOACs; (iv) switching between anticoagulant regimens; (v) ensuring compliance of NOAC intake; (vi) how to deal with dosing errors; (vii) patients with chronic kidney disease; (viii) what to do if there is a (suspected) overdose without bleeding, or a clotting test is indicating a risk of bleeding?; (ix) management of bleeding complications; (x) patients undergoing a planned surgical intervention or ablation; (xi) patients undergoing an urgent surgical intervention; (xii) patients with AF and coronary artery disease; (xiii) cardioversion in a NOAC-treated patient; (xiv) patients presenting with acute stroke while on NOACs; (xv) NOACs vs. VKAs in AF patients with a malignancy. Since new information is becoming available at a rapid pace, an EHRA web site with the latest updated information accompanies the guide (www.NOACforAF.eu). It also contains links to the ESC AF Guidelines, a key message pocket booklet, print-ready files for a proposed universal NOAC anticoagulation card, and feedback possibilities.

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  • Anticoagulant therapy is underused in high-risk AF
    Medical News Today, 26 September 2013

    Investigators are reporting widespread underuse of anticoagulant therapy in patients with atrial fibrillation (AF) who are at high risk of stroke, despite the fact that such therapy is known to decrease stroke risk in this population.

    The findings were released at the European Society of Cardiology (ESC) Congress 2013 and represent one-year outcomes from the ongoing Global Anticoagulant Registry in the Field (GARFIELD), which is the largest prospective database tracking AF patients at increased stroke risk.

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  • Anticoagulant therapy is underused in high-risk AF
    Medical News Today, 26 September 2013

    Investigators are reporting widespread underuse of anticoagulant therapy in patients with atrial fibrillation (AF) who are at high risk of stroke, despite the fact that such therapy is known to decrease stroke risk in this population.

    The findings were released at the European Society of Cardiology (ESC) Congress 2013 and represent one-year outcomes from the ongoing Global Anticoagulant Registry in the Field (GARFIELD), which is the largest prospective database tracking AF patients at increased stroke risk.

    Read more

     

  • Trial reveals reduced risk of AF for patients with devices featuring AdaptivCRT
    Market Watch, 23 Sept 2013

    Medtronic, Inc. today announced clinical trial results showing that heart failure patients treated with its exclusive AdaptivCRT® feature experienced a nearly 50 percent reduction in atrial fibrillation (AF) risk. Pioneered by Medtronic, the AdaptivCRT technology is a feature on certain cardiac resynchronization therapy-defibrillators (CRT-Ds) that continually adjusts therapy to a patient's natural heart rhythms and minimizes the amount of unnecessary right ventricular (RV) pacing. The results were presented today as a late breaking clinical trial at the Heart Failure Society of America's 17th Annual Scientific Meeting.

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  • Trial reveals reduced risk of AF for patients with devices featuring AdaptivCRT
    Market Watch, 23 Sept 2013

    Medtronic, Inc. today announced clinical trial results showing that heart failure patients treated with its exclusive AdaptivCRT® feature experienced a nearly 50 percent reduction in atrial fibrillation (AF) risk. Pioneered by Medtronic, the AdaptivCRT technology is a feature on certain cardiac resynchronization therapy-defibrillators (CRT-Ds) that continually adjusts therapy to a patient's natural heart rhythms and minimizes the amount of unnecessary right ventricular (RV) pacing. The results were presented today as a late breaking clinical trial at the Heart Failure Society of America's 17th Annual Scientific Meeting.

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  • ESC 2013 arrhythmia news highlights
    CRN, 17 Sep 2013

    Christophe Leclercq, Rennes, France, chairperson of two European Society of Cardiology (ESC) 2013 sessions in cardiac resynchronisation therapy, speaks about this year’s congress highlights on arrhythmia and device therapy and also what is expected from the ESC congress 2014 in the electrophysiology field.

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  • ESC 2013 arrhythmia news highlights
    CRN, 17 Sep 2013

    Christophe Leclercq, Rennes, France, chairperson of two European Society of Cardiology (ESC) 2013 sessions in cardiac resynchronisation therapy, speaks about this year’s congress highlights on arrhythmia and device therapy and also what is expected from the ESC congress 2014 in the electrophysiology field.

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  • 'Bad medicine' for AF
    AF Association, 13 Sept 2013

    AF Association responded to an article in the BMJ entitled ‘Bad medicine: atrial fibrillation’ which claimed that the effectiveness of anticoagulation to prevent stroke in AF was overstated. Today, a comprehensive rebuttal of these claims from AF Association's Medical Advisory Committee has been acknowledged and published online in the BMJ.

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  • 'Bad medicine' for AF
    AF Association, 13 Sept 2013

    AF Association responded to an article in the BMJ entitled ‘Bad medicine: atrial fibrillation’ which claimed that the effectiveness of anticoagulation to prevent stroke in AF was overstated. Today, a comprehensive rebuttal of these claims from AF Association's Medical Advisory Committee has been acknowledged and published online in the BMJ.

    Read more

     

  • Mass AF screening flags stroke risk
    HeartWire, 13 Sept 2013

    Systematic screening of more than 25 000 individuals aged 75-76 identified untreated AF in 5%, putting them at increased stroke risk, preliminary findings of the STROKESTOP study show.

    The Swedish study is investigating whether the identification of patients with AF through screening will lead to a reduction in future stroke events.

    Presenting the preliminary data last week here at the European Society of Cardiology (ESC) 2013 Congress, Dr Emma Svennberg (Danderyd University Hospital, Sweden) noted that AF is estimated to affect 1.5% to 2% of the general population, and its prevalence is expected to double in the next 50 years as the population ages.

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  • Mass AF screening flags stroke risk
    HeartWire, 13 Sept 2013

    Systematic screening of more than 25 000 individuals aged 75-76 identified untreated AF in 5%, putting them at increased stroke risk, preliminary findings of the STROKESTOP study show.

    The Swedish study is investigating whether the identification of patients with AF through screening will lead to a reduction in future stroke events.

    Presenting the preliminary data last week here at the European Society of Cardiology (ESC) 2013 Congress, Dr Emma Svennberg (Danderyd University Hospital, Sweden) noted that AF is estimated to affect 1.5% to 2% of the general population, and its prevalence is expected to double in the next 50 years as the population ages.

    Read more

     

  • Pharmacists should take lead on stroke prevention
    PJ Online, 12 Sept 2013

     Pharmacists should take the lead on preventing stroke in patients with atrial fibrillation (AF), consultant cardiovascular pharmacist Helen Williams told participants of a "leading clinical practice" stream at the Royal Pharmaceutical Society annual conference (Birmingham, 8–9 September).

    "If we do not treat patients who are at risk of stroke in AF appropriately then one in every 20 will have a stroke each year," warned Ms Williams who believes that one way to prevent this is to identify more patients who have the condition.

    "GPs and nurses have had the opportunity to find patients with AF over the past 40 years," said Ms Williams, "so maybe it is time for pharmacy to take a leadership role."

    Incorporating pulse checks into routine blood pressure checks, influenza vaccination programmes and health checks are ways that Ms Williams suggested pharmacists can get involved in screening for AF.

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  • Pharmacists should take lead on stroke prevention
    PJ Online, 12 Sept 2013

     Pharmacists should take the lead on preventing stroke in patients with atrial fibrillation (AF), consultant cardiovascular pharmacist Helen Williams told participants of a "leading clinical practice" stream at the Royal Pharmaceutical Society annual conference (Birmingham, 8–9 September).

    "If we do not treat patients who are at risk of stroke in AF appropriately then one in every 20 will have a stroke each year," warned Ms Williams who believes that one way to prevent this is to identify more patients who have the condition.

    "GPs and nurses have had the opportunity to find patients with AF over the past 40 years," said Ms Williams, "so maybe it is time for pharmacy to take a leadership role."

    Incorporating pulse checks into routine blood pressure checks, influenza vaccination programmes and health checks are ways that Ms Williams suggested pharmacists can get involved in screening for AF.

    Read more

     

  • News from EHRA Europace 2013
    BJC, 12 Sept 2013

    Dr James Rosengarten reports highlights from the European Heart Rhythm Association (EHRA) Europace 2013 meeting held recently in Athens, Greece.

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  • News from EHRA Europace 2013
    BJC, 12 Sept 2013

    Dr James Rosengarten reports highlights from the European Heart Rhythm Association (EHRA) Europace 2013 meeting held recently in Athens, Greece.

    Read more

     

  • Catheter ablation may reduce stroke risk in AF
    Cardiac Rhythm News, 5 Sep 2013

    A first of its kind study has shown that patients with atrial fibrillation who undergo catheter ablation have a lower stroke risk than patients who do not undergo the procedure independent of CHADS2 score. The study also found that the stroke risk of atrial fibrillation patients treated with ablation was similar to patients with no history of atrial fibrillation over time. The study was published in the September issue of HeartRhythm.

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  • Catheter ablation may reduce stroke risk in AF
    Cardiac Rhythm News, 5 Sep 2013

    A first of its kind study has shown that patients with atrial fibrillation who undergo catheter ablation have a lower stroke risk than patients who do not undergo the procedure independent of CHADS2 score. The study also found that the stroke risk of atrial fibrillation patients treated with ablation was similar to patients with no history of atrial fibrillation over time. The study was published in the September issue of HeartRhythm.

    Read more

     

  • Fewer French women with AF are on anticoagulants
    theHeart.org, 4 Sep 2013

    French physician Dr Pierre Sabouret presented data taken from a large (1.6-million) patient database during 2010–2011, including 1200 general practitioners. In this retrospective observational cross-sectional study, they used 14 274 patients in the analysis.

    After excluding those with low stroke risk (CHA2DS2-VASc -0 or 1), the researchers discovered that only 48.1% of women were treated with anticoagulation, vs 52.6% of men (p<0.0001). More than 21% of women received only aspirin, which is counter to guideline-directed care. Breaking down the analysis by age revealed young women were nearly half as likely as men to be anticoagulated. The gender gap persisted in women >75 years old but was less pronounced, with older women being 33% less likely to have anticoagulation.

    Read more

     

  • Fewer French women with AF are on anticoagulants
    theHeart.org, 4 Sep 2013

    French physician Dr Pierre Sabouret presented data taken from a large (1.6-million) patient database during 2010–2011, including 1200 general practitioners. In this retrospective observational cross-sectional study, they used 14 274 patients in the analysis.

    After excluding those with low stroke risk (CHA2DS2-VASc -0 or 1), the researchers discovered that only 48.1% of women were treated with anticoagulation, vs 52.6% of men (p<0.0001). More than 21% of women received only aspirin, which is counter to guideline-directed care. Breaking down the analysis by age revealed young women were nearly half as likely as men to be anticoagulated. The gender gap persisted in women >75 years old but was less pronounced, with older women being 33% less likely to have anticoagulation.

    Read more

     

  • GARFIELD data on real-world treatment patterns of at-risk AF populations
    The Sacramento Bee, 3 Sept 2013

    One-year outcomes data from the first cohort of the Global Anticoagulant Registry in the FIELD (GARFIELD), an innovative, independent academic research initiative, provide insights into the elevated stroke risk among subpopulations of patients with atrial fibrillation (AF).  The findings, from eight abstracts presented this week at the ESC Congress 2013, collectively show that anticoagulant therapy – which is known to significantly lower stroke risk in AF patients – is consistently under-utilised among those at-risk AF patients.

    GARFIELD is led by an international steering committee under the auspices of the Thrombosis Research Institute (TRI), London. It is an international, observational, multicentre, prospective study designed to understand the global burden of AF, a common condition in which the two upper chambers of the heart (the atria) quiver rather than beat rhythmically and can lead to life-threatening complications, including stroke. Up to 2% of the population has AF.1 Despite the availability of highly effective preventive treatments, AF-related stroke remains a major and increasing clinical and societal burden.

    Read more

     

  • GARFIELD data on real-world treatment patterns of at-risk AF populations
    The Sacramento Bee, 3 Sept 2013

    One-year outcomes data from the first cohort of the Global Anticoagulant Registry in the FIELD (GARFIELD), an innovative, independent academic research initiative, provide insights into the elevated stroke risk among subpopulations of patients with atrial fibrillation (AF).  The findings, from eight abstracts presented this week at the ESC Congress 2013, collectively show that anticoagulant therapy – which is known to significantly lower stroke risk in AF patients – is consistently under-utilised among those at-risk AF patients.

    GARFIELD is led by an international steering committee under the auspices of the Thrombosis Research Institute (TRI), London. It is an international, observational, multicentre, prospective study designed to understand the global burden of AF, a common condition in which the two upper chambers of the heart (the atria) quiver rather than beat rhythmically and can lead to life-threatening complications, including stroke. Up to 2% of the population has AF.1 Despite the availability of highly effective preventive treatments, AF-related stroke remains a major and increasing clinical and societal burden.

    Read more

     

  • Joining forces to tackle global stroke risk
    AF Association, 3 Sept 2013

    At the European Society of Cardiology Congress 2013 in Amsterdam, the AF Association has launched a partnership aimed at tackling global AF stroke risk by providing patients with greater access to treatment options in accordance with their individual needs.

    The collaboration with the World Stroke Organization and Boston Scientific hopes to raise public, political and healthcare awareness of the risks associated with stroke in AF and the various treatment options available.

    Read more

     

  • Joining forces to tackle global stroke risk
    AF Association, 3 Sept 2013

    At the European Society of Cardiology Congress 2013 in Amsterdam, the AF Association has launched a partnership aimed at tackling global AF stroke risk by providing patients with greater access to treatment options in accordance with their individual needs.

    The collaboration with the World Stroke Organization and Boston Scientific hopes to raise public, political and healthcare awareness of the risks associated with stroke in AF and the various treatment options available.

    Read more

     

  • Knowledge base of AF ablation gets a jolt from the DECAAF trial
    Heart.org, 1 Sep 2013

    An analysis of the Delayed Enhancement-MRI Determinant of Successful Catheter Ablation of Atrial Fibrillation (DECAAF) trial, released today as a hot-line late breaking trial at the European Society of Cardiology (ESC) 2013 Congress, adds to the disruption that began with FIRM ablation .

    Read more

     

  • Knowledge base of AF ablation gets a jolt from the DECAAF trial
    Heart.org, 1 Sep 2013

    An analysis of the Delayed Enhancement-MRI Determinant of Successful Catheter Ablation of Atrial Fibrillation (DECAAF) trial, released today as a hot-line late breaking trial at the European Society of Cardiology (ESC) 2013 Congress, adds to the disruption that began with FIRM ablation .

    Read more

     

  • CHADS2 assigns over third of stroke patients to low/intermediate stroke risk
    Medical Xpress, 1 Sep 2013

    The CHADS2 stroke risk scores 0 or 1 assign more than one-third of patients in atrial fibrillation with stroke to low or intermediate risk not mandating oral anticoagulation, according to research presented at ESC Congress 2013 today by Professor Michael Nabauer from Germany.

    In contrast, a CHA2DS2-VASc score of 0 identifies a subgroup of patients with very low stroke risk unlikely to benefit from anticoagulation treatment.

    Read more

     

  • CHADS2 assigns over third of stroke patients to low/intermediate stroke risk
    Medical Xpress, 1 Sep 2013

    The CHADS2 stroke risk scores 0 or 1 assign more than one-third of patients in atrial fibrillation with stroke to low or intermediate risk not mandating oral anticoagulation, according to research presented at ESC Congress 2013 today by Professor Michael Nabauer from Germany.

    In contrast, a CHA2DS2-VASc score of 0 identifies a subgroup of patients with very low stroke risk unlikely to benefit from anticoagulation treatment.

    Read more

     

  • Blood pressure and AF
    Telemanagement, 1 September 2013

    An epidemiological study shows that pulse pressure is an important risk factor for atrial fibrillation – a 20 mm Hg increase in pulse pressure was associated with a 24% increase in the risk for developing atrial fibrillation.

    Atrial fibrillation (previously called auricular fibrillation) is what cardiologists once described as an “irregular irregularity” of the heartbeat – in other words, the perceived rhythm from the ventricles is rapid but totally irregular. There are about 2½ million people in the USA with atrial fibrillation; it’s more common in old age, along with higher systolic pressure, diabetes, obesity, and conditions affecting the left heart ventricle.

    Read more

     

  • Blood pressure and AF
    Telemanagement, 1 September 2013

    An epidemiological study shows that pulse pressure is an important risk factor for atrial fibrillation – a 20 mm Hg increase in pulse pressure was associated with a 24% increase in the risk for developing atrial fibrillation.

    Atrial fibrillation (previously called auricular fibrillation) is what cardiologists once described as an “irregular irregularity” of the heartbeat – in other words, the perceived rhythm from the ventricles is rapid but totally irregular. There are about 2½ million people in the USA with atrial fibrillation; it’s more common in old age, along with higher systolic pressure, diabetes, obesity, and conditions affecting the left heart ventricle.

    Read more

     

  • Magnetic resonance imaging helps predict success of treatment
    Science Codex, 1 Sept 2013

     In patients with atrial fibrillation, delayed enhancement magnetic resonance imaging (DE-MRI) performed before ablative treatment can stage the degree of damaged heart tissue (atrial fibrosis) and help predict whether treatment will be successful or not, according to results of Delayed Enhancement - MRI determinant of successful Catheter Ablation of Atrial Fibrillation (DECAAF) trial.

    Read more

     

  • Magnetic resonance imaging helps predict success of treatment
    Science Codex, 1 Sept 2013

     In patients with atrial fibrillation, delayed enhancement magnetic resonance imaging (DE-MRI) performed before ablative treatment can stage the degree of damaged heart tissue (atrial fibrosis) and help predict whether treatment will be successful or not, according to results of Delayed Enhancement - MRI determinant of successful Catheter Ablation of Atrial Fibrillation (DECAAF) trial.

    Read more

     

  • GPs undertreat women with AF
    Science Codex, 31 August 2013

    General practitioners (GPs) undertreat women with atrial fibrillation (AF), according to research presented at ESC Congress 2013 today by Dr Pierre Sabouret from France. The analysis of more than 15,000 patients showed that women were undertreated with antithrombotic medications compared to men regardless of their stroke risk and comorbidities.

    Read more

     

  • GPs undertreat women with AF
    Science Codex, 31 August 2013

    General practitioners (GPs) undertreat women with atrial fibrillation (AF), according to research presented at ESC Congress 2013 today by Dr Pierre Sabouret from France. The analysis of more than 15,000 patients showed that women were undertreated with antithrombotic medications compared to men regardless of their stroke risk and comorbidities.

    Read more

     

  • Mass screening identifies untreated AF in 5% of 75-76 year olds
    ESC, 31 August 2013

    Stroke is the second cause of death worldwide. Atrial fibrillation is the most common clinically relevant cardiac arrhythmia in Europe, affecting approximately 1.5-2% of the general population.1 Prevalence is estimated to double in the next 50 years as the population ages.

    Read more

     

  • Mass screening identifies untreated AF in 5% of 75-76 year olds
    ESC, 31 August 2013

    Stroke is the second cause of death worldwide. Atrial fibrillation is the most common clinically relevant cardiac arrhythmia in Europe, affecting approximately 1.5-2% of the general population.1 Prevalence is estimated to double in the next 50 years as the population ages.

    Read more

     

  • Risk of first stroke rises with risk-factor prevalence
    HeartWire, 31 Aug 2013

    As the number of ischemic-stroke risk factors goes up in persons without a history of stroke or atrial fibrillation (AF), so does the risk of stroke—so much so that with at least three risk factors, the stroke risk rises to rival that in patients with AF, suggests an analysis of more than four million persons in healthcare registries across Denmark.

    Read more

     

  • Risk of first stroke rises with risk-factor prevalence
    HeartWire, 31 Aug 2013

    As the number of ischemic-stroke risk factors goes up in persons without a history of stroke or atrial fibrillation (AF), so does the risk of stroke—so much so that with at least three risk factors, the stroke risk rises to rival that in patients with AF, suggests an analysis of more than four million persons in healthcare registries across Denmark.

    Read more

     

  • Framingham funding slashed
    HeartWire, 28 Aug 2013

    The longest-running US trial of cardiovascular disease has seen its funding slashed by 40%, and while the Framingham Heart Study (FHS) is still open and ongoing, there will be layoffs later this year and clinical examinations and laboratory activities will be eliminated.

    The reason for the cutbacks is the automatic funding cuts that went into place as a result of the US government sequestration. In a typical year, the FHS receives approximately $9 million per year from the government through its contract with the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI). However, the funding will be reduced by $4 million in the coming years, a 40% reduction. In addition, 19 administrative and clinical posts are expected to be chopped.

    Read more

     

  • Framingham funding slashed
    HeartWire, 28 Aug 2013

    The longest-running US trial of cardiovascular disease has seen its funding slashed by 40%, and while the Framingham Heart Study (FHS) is still open and ongoing, there will be layoffs later this year and clinical examinations and laboratory activities will be eliminated.

    The reason for the cutbacks is the automatic funding cuts that went into place as a result of the US government sequestration. In a typical year, the FHS receives approximately $9 million per year from the government through its contract with the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI). However, the funding will be reduced by $4 million in the coming years, a 40% reduction. In addition, 19 administrative and clinical posts are expected to be chopped.

    Read more

     

  • Personalised AF management needed to close mortality gap
    Red Orbit, 27 August 2013

    Personalised management is the only way to close the mortality gap for patients with atrial fibrillation (AF), according to an ESC consensus paper presented at ESC Congress 2013 by Professor Paulus Kirchhof (UK).

    The Atrial Fibrillation competence NETwork (AFNET) and European Heart Rhythm Association (EHRA) consensus paper is published online in the European Journal of Pacing, Arrhythmias, and Cardiac Electrophysiology (EP-Europace)1 and presented during the ESC Congress session on personalised cardiology.

    Professor Kirchhof said: “Acute and 1-year mortality after myocardial infarction has dropped by two-thirds in the last 10 to 15 years primarily because of medical interventions aimed at the principal pathophysiology causing the disease. For example acute revascularisation procedures are used to treat a thrombotic blockage of the artery while statins prevent the development and rupture of coronary plaques.”

    Read more

     

  • Personalised AF management needed to close mortality gap
    Red Orbit, 27 August 2013

    Personalised management is the only way to close the mortality gap for patients with atrial fibrillation (AF), according to an ESC consensus paper presented at ESC Congress 2013 by Professor Paulus Kirchhof (UK).

    The Atrial Fibrillation competence NETwork (AFNET) and European Heart Rhythm Association (EHRA) consensus paper is published online in the European Journal of Pacing, Arrhythmias, and Cardiac Electrophysiology (EP-Europace)1 and presented during the ESC Congress session on personalised cardiology.

    Professor Kirchhof said: “Acute and 1-year mortality after myocardial infarction has dropped by two-thirds in the last 10 to 15 years primarily because of medical interventions aimed at the principal pathophysiology causing the disease. For example acute revascularisation procedures are used to treat a thrombotic blockage of the artery while statins prevent the development and rupture of coronary plaques.”

    Read more

     

  • Genetics may play role in AF
    Telemanagement, 24 August 2013

    Children have double the risk of developing atrial fibrillation if a parent has this heart rhythm disorder, according to a study of participants in Framingham Heart Study. This is the study to find a genetic connection for atrial fibrillation in a community sample.
    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is a rapid and abnormal heart rhythm (arrhythmia) caused by faulty electrical signals from the upper chambers of the heart (atria). Electrical signals should normally be coming only from the sinus node (the heart’s natural pacemaker) in a steady rhythm – about 60 to 100 beats per minute. AF is marked by rapidly firing signals that come from the atria, increasing the heart rate to 100 to 175 beats per minute or more.

    In response to these many rapid and chaotic signals, the atria quiver instead of contracting properly. Due to these abnormal contractions, the heart’s lower chambers ventricles beat rapidly. AF is the most common type of sustained arrhythmia, affecting 2 million people each year in the United States alone.

    The study found that the risk doubled for children with at least one parent who had AF compared to children whose parents did not have the condition. This risk tripled when both parents had AF.

    Read more

     

  • Genetics may play role in AF
    Telemanagement, 24 August 2013

    Children have double the risk of developing atrial fibrillation if a parent has this heart rhythm disorder, according to a study of participants in Framingham Heart Study. This is the study to find a genetic connection for atrial fibrillation in a community sample.
    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is a rapid and abnormal heart rhythm (arrhythmia) caused by faulty electrical signals from the upper chambers of the heart (atria). Electrical signals should normally be coming only from the sinus node (the heart’s natural pacemaker) in a steady rhythm – about 60 to 100 beats per minute. AF is marked by rapidly firing signals that come from the atria, increasing the heart rate to 100 to 175 beats per minute or more.

    In response to these many rapid and chaotic signals, the atria quiver instead of contracting properly. Due to these abnormal contractions, the heart’s lower chambers ventricles beat rapidly. AF is the most common type of sustained arrhythmia, affecting 2 million people each year in the United States alone.

    The study found that the risk doubled for children with at least one parent who had AF compared to children whose parents did not have the condition. This risk tripled when both parents had AF.

    Read more

     

  • Drug therapy post-stroke 'reduces risk of cognitive impairment'
    Pulse, 20 August 2013

    Pharmacological therapy to reduce blood pressure, thrombosis and cholesterol in patients who have had a stroke can reduce the risk of cognitive impairment by up to 45%, suggests a UK study.

    The study

    Researchers looked at data on first-ever strokes in patients of all ages for an inner area of South London. The data were recorded over a 10-year period. Of the 271,817 individuals in the source population, 4,413 individuals had a stroke during the study period. Modified regression models were constructed to adjust for cognitive function status at three months, demographic and socioeconomic characteristics, stroke subtype, vascular risk factors, disability and stroke recurrence.

    Read more

     

  • Drug therapy post-stroke 'reduces risk of cognitive impairment'
    Pulse, 20 August 2013

    Pharmacological therapy to reduce blood pressure, thrombosis and cholesterol in patients who have had a stroke can reduce the risk of cognitive impairment by up to 45%, suggests a UK study.

    The study

    Researchers looked at data on first-ever strokes in patients of all ages for an inner area of South London. The data were recorded over a 10-year period. Of the 271,817 individuals in the source population, 4,413 individuals had a stroke during the study period. Modified regression models were constructed to adjust for cognitive function status at three months, demographic and socioeconomic characteristics, stroke subtype, vascular risk factors, disability and stroke recurrence.

    Read more

     

  • Safety of warfarin investigated in elderly
    Telemanagement, 17 August 2013

    Scientists at Massachusetts General Hospital looked at the use of warfarin in 170 people who had developed hemorrhage and in a comparison group of 744 who had not had a hemorrhage. They found that in the over-85 age group, warfarin was indeed linked to hemorrhage risk. However, this group actually has the most to gain from warfarin, in terms of decreased risk of stroke – so treatment must be tightly controlled. The team also found that higher level treatment of warfarin was better at avoiding stroke risk. For all patients, warfarin anticoagulation must always be carefully monitored so that the level that balances benefit against risk is achieved.

    Read more

     

  • Safety of warfarin investigated in elderly
    Telemanagement, 17 August 2013

    Scientists at Massachusetts General Hospital looked at the use of warfarin in 170 people who had developed hemorrhage and in a comparison group of 744 who had not had a hemorrhage. They found that in the over-85 age group, warfarin was indeed linked to hemorrhage risk. However, this group actually has the most to gain from warfarin, in terms of decreased risk of stroke – so treatment must be tightly controlled. The team also found that higher level treatment of warfarin was better at avoiding stroke risk. For all patients, warfarin anticoagulation must always be carefully monitored so that the level that balances benefit against risk is achieved.

    Read more

     

  • Apixaban approved in Ireland
    Irish Health, 14 August 2013

    The State drug costs watchdog has approved a new drug that can prevent stroke and blood clots in patients with  the heart condition atrial fibrillation (AF).

    This means that the drug will now be available to medical card patients and will qualify for refunds under the Drug Payments Scheme, as a result of approval by the National Centre for Pharmacoeconomics (NCPE).

    The newly-approved drug, Eliquis (generic name apixaban), is one of a group of new anticoagulants reported to be better at preventing stroke than the traditional treatment, warfarin. Two other drugs in this category have previously been approved for State schemes by the NCPE.

    The new anticoagulants are also reported to be easier for patients to adhere to than warfarin, as they do not require regular blood monitoring and have fewer side effects.

    Read more

     

  • Apixaban approved in Ireland
    Irish Health, 14 August 2013

    The State drug costs watchdog has approved a new drug that can prevent stroke and blood clots in patients with  the heart condition atrial fibrillation (AF).

    This means that the drug will now be available to medical card patients and will qualify for refunds under the Drug Payments Scheme, as a result of approval by the National Centre for Pharmacoeconomics (NCPE).

    The newly-approved drug, Eliquis (generic name apixaban), is one of a group of new anticoagulants reported to be better at preventing stroke than the traditional treatment, warfarin. Two other drugs in this category have previously been approved for State schemes by the NCPE.

    The new anticoagulants are also reported to be easier for patients to adhere to than warfarin, as they do not require regular blood monitoring and have fewer side effects.

    Read more

     

  • Ankle-Brachial Index helps ID risk in AF
    MedPage Today, 14 August 2013

    Inclusion of the ankle-brachial index (ABI) may better define the presence of vascular disease in patients with nonvalvular atrial fibrillation, an Italian registry study showed.

    The established CHA2DS2-VASc risk score tagged 17.3% of patients with vascular disease, a figure that increased to 33% when information on ABIs of 0.90 or lower was added, according to Francesco Violi, MD, of Sapienza University of Rome, and colleagues.

    "If ABI ≤0.90 was encompassed in the definition of vascular disease of CHA2DS2-VASc score [documented by a history of acute myocardial infarction (MI), symptomatic peripheral artery disease, or detection of atherosclerotic plaque in the aortic arch], the prevalence of vascular disease increased in every risk class," they reported online in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

    Read more

     

  • Ankle-Brachial Index helps ID risk in AF
    MedPage Today, 14 August 2013

    Inclusion of the ankle-brachial index (ABI) may better define the presence of vascular disease in patients with nonvalvular atrial fibrillation, an Italian registry study showed.

    The established CHA2DS2-VASc risk score tagged 17.3% of patients with vascular disease, a figure that increased to 33% when information on ABIs of 0.90 or lower was added, according to Francesco Violi, MD, of Sapienza University of Rome, and colleagues.

    "If ABI ≤0.90 was encompassed in the definition of vascular disease of CHA2DS2-VASc score [documented by a history of acute myocardial infarction (MI), symptomatic peripheral artery disease, or detection of atherosclerotic plaque in the aortic arch], the prevalence of vascular disease increased in every risk class," they reported online in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

    Read more

     

  • Australian researchers conduct large screening pilot
    Business Standard, 13 August 2013

    A new smartphone case and app can be used to quickly and cheaply detect heart rhythm problems and prevent strokes.

    University of Sydney researchers found the AliveCor Heart Monitor for iPhone (iECG) is a highly-effective, accurate and cost-effective way to screen patients to identify previously undiagnosed atrial fibrillation (AF) and hence help prevent strokes.

    The iECG allows doctors to screen patients for atrial fibrillation, the most common heart rhythm problem, in minutes and treat them early.

    Senior author, Professor Ben Freedman, said that the device was an exciting breakthrough and would assist in the challenge to improve early identification of atrial fibrillation and prevention of stroke.

    Read more

     

  • Australian researchers conduct large screening pilot
    Business Standard, 13 August 2013

    A new smartphone case and app can be used to quickly and cheaply detect heart rhythm problems and prevent strokes.

    University of Sydney researchers found the AliveCor Heart Monitor for iPhone (iECG) is a highly-effective, accurate and cost-effective way to screen patients to identify previously undiagnosed atrial fibrillation (AF) and hence help prevent strokes.

    The iECG allows doctors to screen patients for atrial fibrillation, the most common heart rhythm problem, in minutes and treat them early.

    Senior author, Professor Ben Freedman, said that the device was an exciting breakthrough and would assist in the challenge to improve early identification of atrial fibrillation and prevention of stroke.

    Read more

     

  • Depression increases mortality in AF
    Telemanagement, 10 August 2013

    Depression has been associated with worse outcomes in many cardiac conditions, including congestive heart failure (CHF). A Canadian researchers report that increased symptoms of depression are linked to cardiovascular mortality in patients who have atrial fibrillation and CHF, despite optimal medical treatment.

    Read more

     

  • Depression increases mortality in AF
    Telemanagement, 10 August 2013

    Depression has been associated with worse outcomes in many cardiac conditions, including congestive heart failure (CHF). A Canadian researchers report that increased symptoms of depression are linked to cardiovascular mortality in patients who have atrial fibrillation and CHF, despite optimal medical treatment.

    Read more

     

  • AF link to oral disease?
    RDH, 7 August 2013

    Improvement of oral hygiene through dental scaling was associated with a decreased risk of cardiovascular events. The goal of one study was to investigate whether dental scaling can reduce the risk of atrial fibrillation (AF).

    According to the study in the International Journal of Cardiology, there is a relationship between periodontal health and cardiac dysrhythmia. The researchers and authors of the study believe that one way to lower the risk of developing atrial fibrillation, the most common type of sustained cardiac dysrhythmia, is to receive a dental scaling at least once a year.

    Atrial fibrillation is the most common type of arrhythmia (abnormal heart rhythm). When atrial fibrillation and other arrhythmias occur, the electrical activity of the heart is disorganized, which causes an irregular heartbeat. An irregular heartbeat disrupts the flow of blood through the heart.

    Atrial fibrillation affected approximately 2.7 million Americans in 2010, according to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). AF's disorganized cardiac electrical impulses and incomplete atrial emptying place patients at increased risk for clots, strokes, and heart failure, the CDC noted. Symptoms of atrial fibrillation include irregular or rapid heartbeat, palpitations, lightheadedness, extreme fatigue, shortness of breath, and chest pain. However, not all people with atrial fibrillation experience symptoms.

    Read more

     

  • AF link to oral disease?
    RDH, 7 August 2013

    Improvement of oral hygiene through dental scaling was associated with a decreased risk of cardiovascular events. The goal of one study was to investigate whether dental scaling can reduce the risk of atrial fibrillation (AF).

    According to the study in the International Journal of Cardiology, there is a relationship between periodontal health and cardiac dysrhythmia. The researchers and authors of the study believe that one way to lower the risk of developing atrial fibrillation, the most common type of sustained cardiac dysrhythmia, is to receive a dental scaling at least once a year.

    Atrial fibrillation is the most common type of arrhythmia (abnormal heart rhythm). When atrial fibrillation and other arrhythmias occur, the electrical activity of the heart is disorganized, which causes an irregular heartbeat. An irregular heartbeat disrupts the flow of blood through the heart.

    Atrial fibrillation affected approximately 2.7 million Americans in 2010, according to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). AF's disorganized cardiac electrical impulses and incomplete atrial emptying place patients at increased risk for clots, strokes, and heart failure, the CDC noted. Symptoms of atrial fibrillation include irregular or rapid heartbeat, palpitations, lightheadedness, extreme fatigue, shortness of breath, and chest pain. However, not all people with atrial fibrillation experience symptoms.

    Read more

     

  • Persistence rates higher with dabigatran than warfarin
    Heart Wire, 7 August 2013

    An analysis of US administrative data suggests that patients with nonvalvular atrial fibrillation (AF) treated with dabigatran etexilate (Pradaxa, Boehringer Ingelheim) are more persistent in taking their medication than patients treated with warfarin.

    Published online August 6, 2013 in Circulation: Cardiovascular Quality and Outcomes, the study showed that 63% of patients prescribed dabigatran were taking their drug when measured at one year compared with 39% of patients who were prescribed warfarin.

    Read more

     

  • Persistence rates higher with dabigatran than warfarin
    Heart Wire, 7 August 2013

    An analysis of US administrative data suggests that patients with nonvalvular atrial fibrillation (AF) treated with dabigatran etexilate (Pradaxa, Boehringer Ingelheim) are more persistent in taking their medication than patients treated with warfarin.

    Published online August 6, 2013 in Circulation: Cardiovascular Quality and Outcomes, the study showed that 63% of patients prescribed dabigatran were taking their drug when measured at one year compared with 39% of patients who were prescribed warfarin.

    Read more

     

  • Launch of AFA Australia
    AF Association, 6 August 2013

    AF Association Australia is the first official affiliate of Arrhythmia Alliance Australia, which launched on 6th August 2013.

    Around 240,000 Australians have atrial fibrillation (AF). AFA Australia is working with regional heart rhythm specialists to promote better understanding, timely diagnosis, effective treatment and quality of life for these people.

    CEO of the charity, Trudie Lobban MBE, visited Australia to meet with leading AF specialists, including Professor Ben Freedman (pictured) who is a member of the AFA Australia Medical Advisory Committee.

    This partnership will help strengthen understanding and awareness of the most common heart rhythm disorder in the world: AF.

    Read more

     

  • Launch of AFA Australia
    AF Association, 6 August 2013

    AF Association Australia is the first official affiliate of Arrhythmia Alliance Australia, which launched on 6th August 2013.

    Around 240,000 Australians have atrial fibrillation (AF). AFA Australia is working with regional heart rhythm specialists to promote better understanding, timely diagnosis, effective treatment and quality of life for these people.

    CEO of the charity, Trudie Lobban MBE, visited Australia to meet with leading AF specialists, including Professor Ben Freedman (pictured) who is a member of the AFA Australia Medical Advisory Committee.

    This partnership will help strengthen understanding and awareness of the most common heart rhythm disorder in the world: AF.

    Read more

     

  • Apixaban benefits AF patients regardless of previous warfarin use
    TCTMD, 6 August 2013

    The novel oral anticoagulant apixaban has similar effects on stroke, systemic embolism and major bleeding in patients with atrial fibrillation (A-fib) whether they have been on previous warfarin therapy or not, according to a subanalysis of the ARISTOTLE trial published online July 26, 2013, ahead of print in the American Heart Journal.

    ARISTOTLE (Apixaban for Reduction In STroke and Other ThromboemboLic Events in atrial fibrillation) randomized 18,201 patients with A-fib and at least 1 stroke risk factor to dose-adjusted warfarin plus placebo or the oral factor Xa inhibitor apixaban (5 mg [2.5 mg for those at high bleeding risk] twice daily) plus placebo. Apixaban proved superior to warfarin for preventing stroke or systemic embolism, the primary endpoint.

    For the subanalysis, David Garcia, MD, of the University of Washington (Seattle, WA), and colleagues assessed the ARISTOTLE results according to whether patients were warfarin naive or not prior to study enrollment. This was done due to the observation from retrospective studies that patients with little or no exposure to anticoagulation may be at higher risk of adverse outcomes than patients who have been on such therapy previously.

    Read more

     

  • Apixaban benefits AF patients regardless of previous warfarin use
    TCTMD, 6 August 2013

    The novel oral anticoagulant apixaban has similar effects on stroke, systemic embolism and major bleeding in patients with atrial fibrillation (A-fib) whether they have been on previous warfarin therapy or not, according to a subanalysis of the ARISTOTLE trial published online July 26, 2013, ahead of print in the American Heart Journal.

    ARISTOTLE (Apixaban for Reduction In STroke and Other ThromboemboLic Events in atrial fibrillation) randomized 18,201 patients with A-fib and at least 1 stroke risk factor to dose-adjusted warfarin plus placebo or the oral factor Xa inhibitor apixaban (5 mg [2.5 mg for those at high bleeding risk] twice daily) plus placebo. Apixaban proved superior to warfarin for preventing stroke or systemic embolism, the primary endpoint.

    For the subanalysis, David Garcia, MD, of the University of Washington (Seattle, WA), and colleagues assessed the ARISTOTLE results according to whether patients were warfarin naive or not prior to study enrollment. This was done due to the observation from retrospective studies that patients with little or no exposure to anticoagulation may be at higher risk of adverse outcomes than patients who have been on such therapy previously.

    Read more

     

  • Latest from CALON
    Cedar, 5 Aug 2013

    Read the latest news from CALON (Cardiac ablation: Linking outcomes for NICE).

    Read more

     

  • Latest from CALON
    Cedar, 5 Aug 2013

    Read the latest news from CALON (Cardiac ablation: Linking outcomes for NICE).

    Read more

     

  • How to stop bleeding in the ER caused by warfarin
    Red Orbit, 5 August 2013

    Prothrombin complex concentrates (PCCs) are faster and more effective than fresh frozen plasma at reversing hemorrhage caused by the anti-coagulant warfarin, despite plasma being the most commonly used therapy. A literature review published last month in Annals of Emergency Medicine suggests that physicians in the United States should join those around the world in following recommendations of multiple specialty organizations to use PCCs as the first line of defense in this common and life-threatening emergency (Rapid Reversal of Warfarin-Associated Hemorrhage in the Emergency Department by Prothrombin Complex Concentrates).

    "The typical remedies for hemorrhage caused by warfarin are slow and unpredictable," said author Kenneth Frumkin, PhD, MD of the Naval Medical Center in Portsmouth, Va. "By contrast, prothrombin complex concentrates reverse warfarin anticoagulation in minutes rather than hours. Its relative underuse in the U.S. compared to other countries seems to derive from lack of familiarity and infrequent availability."

    PCCs (products made from pooled human plasma) were initially developed to treat hemophilia. They can be infused rapidly and generally reverse anticoagulation three to five times faster than fresh frozen plasma, which must be thawed. Recombinant Activated Factor VII (Factor rVIIa), while approved in the United States only for surgery or bleeding in hemophiliacs, has been used to reverse warfarin-associated bleeding. Factor rVIIa works faster than fresh frozen plasma, but carries more risk and costs much more.

    "The April 2013 approval by the Food and Drug Administration of a form of PCC specifically intended for warfarin reversal should expand the use of these life-saving products," said Dr. Frumkin.

    The views expressed by Dr. Frumkin are his own, and do not necessarily reflect the official policy or position of the Department of the Navy, Department of Defense, or the United States Government.

    Read more

     

  • How to stop bleeding in the ER caused by warfarin
    Red Orbit, 5 August 2013

    Prothrombin complex concentrates (PCCs) are faster and more effective than fresh frozen plasma at reversing hemorrhage caused by the anti-coagulant warfarin, despite plasma being the most commonly used therapy. A literature review published last month in Annals of Emergency Medicine suggests that physicians in the United States should join those around the world in following recommendations of multiple specialty organizations to use PCCs as the first line of defense in this common and life-threatening emergency (Rapid Reversal of Warfarin-Associated Hemorrhage in the Emergency Department by Prothrombin Complex Concentrates).

    "The typical remedies for hemorrhage caused by warfarin are slow and unpredictable," said author Kenneth Frumkin, PhD, MD of the Naval Medical Center in Portsmouth, Va. "By contrast, prothrombin complex concentrates reverse warfarin anticoagulation in minutes rather than hours. Its relative underuse in the U.S. compared to other countries seems to derive from lack of familiarity and infrequent availability."

    PCCs (products made from pooled human plasma) were initially developed to treat hemophilia. They can be infused rapidly and generally reverse anticoagulation three to five times faster than fresh frozen plasma, which must be thawed. Recombinant Activated Factor VII (Factor rVIIa), while approved in the United States only for surgery or bleeding in hemophiliacs, has been used to reverse warfarin-associated bleeding. Factor rVIIa works faster than fresh frozen plasma, but carries more risk and costs much more.

    "The April 2013 approval by the Food and Drug Administration of a form of PCC specifically intended for warfarin reversal should expand the use of these life-saving products," said Dr. Frumkin.

    The views expressed by Dr. Frumkin are his own, and do not necessarily reflect the official policy or position of the Department of the Navy, Department of Defense, or the United States Government.

    Read more

     

  • Apixaban in AF: Indications of considerable added benefit
    Science Codex, 2 August 2013

    The clot-inhibiting drug apixaban (trade name: Eliquis) has been approved in Germany since November 2012 for the prevention of embolism and stroke in adults with non-valvular atrial fibrillation. In an early benefit assessment pursuant to the "Act on the Reform of the Market for Medicinal Products" (AMNOG), the German Institute for Quality and Efficiency in Health Care (IQWiG) examined the added benefit of apixaban.

    Read more

     

  • Apixaban in AF: Indications of considerable added benefit
    Science Codex, 2 August 2013

    The clot-inhibiting drug apixaban (trade name: Eliquis) has been approved in Germany since November 2012 for the prevention of embolism and stroke in adults with non-valvular atrial fibrillation. In an early benefit assessment pursuant to the "Act on the Reform of the Market for Medicinal Products" (AMNOG), the German Institute for Quality and Efficiency in Health Care (IQWiG) examined the added benefit of apixaban.

    Read more

     

  • Young HF patients ok with warfarin
    MedPage Today, 31 July 2013

    he benefit of warfarin over aspirin in heart failure patients appears to be age-related, with younger patients accounting for the greater share of risk reduction, a subanalysis of the WARCEF trial found.

    After adjusting for all factors, age under 60 was the only variable associated with a reduced likelihood of achieving the composite primary endpoint of first ischemic stroke, death, or intracerebral hemorrhage, Shunichi Homma, MD, of Columbia University Medical Center in New York City, and colleagues wrote.

    Read more

     

  • Young HF patients ok with warfarin
    MedPage Today, 31 July 2013

    he benefit of warfarin over aspirin in heart failure patients appears to be age-related, with younger patients accounting for the greater share of risk reduction, a subanalysis of the WARCEF trial found.

    After adjusting for all factors, age under 60 was the only variable associated with a reduced likelihood of achieving the composite primary endpoint of first ischemic stroke, death, or intracerebral hemorrhage, Shunichi Homma, MD, of Columbia University Medical Center in New York City, and colleagues wrote.

    Read more

     

  • Update on commissioning of LAAO
    AF Association, 30 July 2013

    NHS England published draft commissioning policies last November, stating left atrial appendage occlusion (LAAO) procedures would not routinely funded. The AF Association campaigned against this proposal with the support of AF patients, carers and healthcare professionals in February. This treatment option is imperative for AF patients at risk of AF-related stroke but who are contraindicated for oral anticoagulants.

    Increasing risk of stroke by up to 500%; AF was recognised in the Department of Health’s Cardiovascular Disease Outcomes Strategy published in March. So, addressing the risk of AF-related stroke is a priority for the NHS.

    In April, NHS England published updated clinical commissioning policies following a consultation. A clinical policy statement has been produced that states the LAAO procedure will not be routinely funded, but it will be assessed further through a ‘commissioning through evaluation’ process.  This is aimed at ensuring further evidence is accumulated while a limited number of procedures are carried out at dedicated centres known to meet agreed standards of quality and excellence. Results will be collated and reviewed to provide further evidence on the safety and efficacy of the procedure.

    The AF Association is involved in helping to design this process and is pressing to ensure that not only is there equity of access, but also timely referral for consideration of the procedure.

    Currently plans are only in draft pending a review by NHS England to confirm whether the proposals are approved. It is hoped that NHS England will re-instate commissioning from October 2013, however both the date and the detail has yet to be confirmed.

    Read more

     

  • Update on commissioning of LAAO
    AF Association, 30 July 2013

    NHS England published draft commissioning policies last November, stating left atrial appendage occlusion (LAAO) procedures would not routinely funded. The AF Association campaigned against this proposal with the support of AF patients, carers and healthcare professionals in February. This treatment option is imperative for AF patients at risk of AF-related stroke but who are contraindicated for oral anticoagulants.

    Increasing risk of stroke by up to 500%; AF was recognised in the Department of Health’s Cardiovascular Disease Outcomes Strategy published in March. So, addressing the risk of AF-related stroke is a priority for the NHS.

    In April, NHS England published updated clinical commissioning policies following a consultation. A clinical policy statement has been produced that states the LAAO procedure will not be routinely funded, but it will be assessed further through a ‘commissioning through evaluation’ process.  This is aimed at ensuring further evidence is accumulated while a limited number of procedures are carried out at dedicated centres known to meet agreed standards of quality and excellence. Results will be collated and reviewed to provide further evidence on the safety and efficacy of the procedure.

    The AF Association is involved in helping to design this process and is pressing to ensure that not only is there equity of access, but also timely referral for consideration of the procedure.

    Currently plans are only in draft pending a review by NHS England to confirm whether the proposals are approved. It is hoped that NHS England will re-instate commissioning from October 2013, however both the date and the detail has yet to be confirmed.

    Read more

     

  • Clopidogrel with aspirin in acute minor stroke or TIA
    Heart Wire, 29 July 2013

    A recent Chinese study published in the New England Journal of Medicine reports a one-third reduction in recurrent stroke after 90 days in patients with an acute minor stroke or TIA who were randomized to dual antiplatelet therapy–with aspirin and clopidogrel—compared with those taking aspirin alone.

    Read more

     

  • Clopidogrel with aspirin in acute minor stroke or TIA
    Heart Wire, 29 July 2013

    A recent Chinese study published in the New England Journal of Medicine reports a one-third reduction in recurrent stroke after 90 days in patients with an acute minor stroke or TIA who were randomized to dual antiplatelet therapy–with aspirin and clopidogrel—compared with those taking aspirin alone.

    Read more

     

  • Low heart rate during exercise linked to future risk of AF
    theHeart.org, 23 July 2013

    Data from a long-term prospective study of healthy, middle-aged Norwegian men suggests that a low heart rate during moderate-intensity exercise is linked with future risk of AF.

    "We found that the men who did not exceed 100 bpm at the end of six minutes of workload had a significantly increased AF risk," write Dr Irene Grundvold (Oslo University Hospital, Norway) and colleagues in the paper published July 21, 2013 in Circulation: Arrhythmia and Electrophysiology. In an analysis by tertile, those with heart rates <110 bpm after six minutes of moderate-intensity exercise had a significantly increased risk of AF compared with those with a heart rate >125 bpm.

    There is evidence that individuals who participate in longstanding endurance training might have an increased risk of AF as they get older, according to the researchers. One other study of Norwegian master cross-country skiers found that a low resting heart rate was a long-term predictor of AF.

    Read more

     

  • Low heart rate during exercise linked to future risk of AF
    theHeart.org, 23 July 2013

    Data from a long-term prospective study of healthy, middle-aged Norwegian men suggests that a low heart rate during moderate-intensity exercise is linked with future risk of AF.

    "We found that the men who did not exceed 100 bpm at the end of six minutes of workload had a significantly increased AF risk," write Dr Irene Grundvold (Oslo University Hospital, Norway) and colleagues in the paper published July 21, 2013 in Circulation: Arrhythmia and Electrophysiology. In an analysis by tertile, those with heart rates <110 bpm after six minutes of moderate-intensity exercise had a significantly increased risk of AF compared with those with a heart rate >125 bpm.

    There is evidence that individuals who participate in longstanding endurance training might have an increased risk of AF as they get older, according to the researchers. One other study of Norwegian master cross-country skiers found that a low resting heart rate was a long-term predictor of AF.

    Read more

     

  • Aspirin often added to warfarin in AF without CAD, despite bleeding risk
    theHeart.org, 19 July 2013

    More than a third of patients with atrial fibrillation (AF) who were on oral anticoagulation in a large cohort study were also taking aspirin. Although most on aspirin also had some sort of vascular disease, the remaining 39% had no history of PCI, MI, cerebrovascular events, or other clinical cardiovascular disease that might justify aspirin use under the guidelines.

    In the evidence base and in the guidelines, it's a gray area whether patients with both AF and CV disease should get aspirin along with their oral anticoagulation, senior author Dr Eric D Peterson (Duke Clinical Research Institute, Durham, NC) explained for heartwire. Oral anticoagulation in the current analysis essentially meant warfarin.

    Read more

     

  • Aspirin often added to warfarin in AF without CAD, despite bleeding risk
    theHeart.org, 19 July 2013

    More than a third of patients with atrial fibrillation (AF) who were on oral anticoagulation in a large cohort study were also taking aspirin. Although most on aspirin also had some sort of vascular disease, the remaining 39% had no history of PCI, MI, cerebrovascular events, or other clinical cardiovascular disease that might justify aspirin use under the guidelines.

    In the evidence base and in the guidelines, it's a gray area whether patients with both AF and CV disease should get aspirin along with their oral anticoagulation, senior author Dr Eric D Peterson (Duke Clinical Research Institute, Durham, NC) explained for heartwire. Oral anticoagulation in the current analysis essentially meant warfarin.

    Read more

     

  • Regularly breaking a sweat may protect against stroke
    theHeart.org, 19 July 2013

    Failing to regularly work up a sweat through exercise may raise risks for a stroke or transient ischemic attack (TIA), a new study confirms [1].

    The study found that participants who were inactive had a 20% increased risk of stroke compared with those who exercised four or more times per week and that those who were active one to three times a week were 16% more likely to suffer a stroke.

    "The point here is that you should be exercising four times a week at least and doing it hard enough so that you're getting a bit of a sweat," lead author Dr Michelle N McDonnell (University of South Australia, Adelaide) said in an interview.

    The study was published online July 18, 2013 in Stroke.

    Read more

     

  • Regularly breaking a sweat may protect against stroke
    theHeart.org, 19 July 2013

    Failing to regularly work up a sweat through exercise may raise risks for a stroke or transient ischemic attack (TIA), a new study confirms [1].

    The study found that participants who were inactive had a 20% increased risk of stroke compared with those who exercised four or more times per week and that those who were active one to three times a week were 16% more likely to suffer a stroke.

    "The point here is that you should be exercising four times a week at least and doing it hard enough so that you're getting a bit of a sweat," lead author Dr Michelle N McDonnell (University of South Australia, Adelaide) said in an interview.

    The study was published online July 18, 2013 in Stroke.

    Read more

     

  • Become a specialist member of the anxiety disorders quality standards advisory committee
    NICE, July 2013

    NICE works with independent Quality Standards Advisory Committees (QSAC) to develop quality standards for a range of settings and audiences related to health and social care pathways or service areas. Derived from evidence-based guidance, these standards are significant levers for improvement in quality across the health and social care system. The standards will also be used to develop indicators for potential inclusion within the Clinical Commissioning Groups Outcome Indicator Set and Quality and Outcomes Framework (QOF) for general practice.

    QSACs are made up of 21 standing members, including the chair, and approximately 5 specialist committee members who are appointed to the committee for the duration of each quality standard development. Whilst standing members are experts in their own field and in the development of quality standards, specialist committee members bring expertise on the topic under consideration to the development process.

    Chairs and members of the QSACs are drawn from health and social care practitioners, academia, patients, service users and carers. They do not represent their organisations but are selected for their expertise, experience of working with multidisciplinary and lay colleagues and understanding of evidence based health and social care.

    Read more

     

  • Become a specialist member of the anxiety disorders quality standards advisory committee
    NICE, July 2013

    NICE works with independent Quality Standards Advisory Committees (QSAC) to develop quality standards for a range of settings and audiences related to health and social care pathways or service areas. Derived from evidence-based guidance, these standards are significant levers for improvement in quality across the health and social care system. The standards will also be used to develop indicators for potential inclusion within the Clinical Commissioning Groups Outcome Indicator Set and Quality and Outcomes Framework (QOF) for general practice.

    QSACs are made up of 21 standing members, including the chair, and approximately 5 specialist committee members who are appointed to the committee for the duration of each quality standard development. Whilst standing members are experts in their own field and in the development of quality standards, specialist committee members bring expertise on the topic under consideration to the development process.

    Chairs and members of the QSACs are drawn from health and social care practitioners, academia, patients, service users and carers. They do not represent their organisations but are selected for their expertise, experience of working with multidisciplinary and lay colleagues and understanding of evidence based health and social care.

    Read more

     

  • New GP contract set to 'tackle warfarin issues'
    Irish Medical Times, 19 July 2013

    Officials in Ireland's Department of Health are in consultation with the HSE with a view to drawing-up a new GP contract and “the appropriate arrangements in relation to anti-coagulation therapy will be considered as part of the new contract”, Minister of State Alex White has said.

    Read more

     

  • New GP contract set to 'tackle warfarin issues'
    Irish Medical Times, 19 July 2013

    Officials in Ireland's Department of Health are in consultation with the HSE with a view to drawing-up a new GP contract and “the appropriate arrangements in relation to anti-coagulation therapy will be considered as part of the new contract”, Minister of State Alex White has said.

    Read more

     

  • Lack of anticoagulants after cardioversion of acute AF may increase complications
    Cardiology Today, 18 July 2013

    When no anticoagulation is used after cardioversion of acute atrial fibrillation, patients with conventional risk factors for thromboembolism are at increased risk for stroke and other thromboembolic events, according to results from a large retrospective study.

    Read more

     

  • Lack of anticoagulants after cardioversion of acute AF may increase complications
    Cardiology Today, 18 July 2013

    When no anticoagulation is used after cardioversion of acute atrial fibrillation, patients with conventional risk factors for thromboembolism are at increased risk for stroke and other thromboembolic events, according to results from a large retrospective study.

    Read more

     

  • Report suggests 6 strategies to prevent heart failure readmissions
    MedPage Today, 18 July 2013

    Hundreds of millions of dollars could be saved if hospitals implemented six strategies aimed at reducing heart failure readmissions, a large national sample of hospitals revealed.

    Individually, the six strategies had a modest but still significant size effect ranging from 0.34 to 0.18 percentage points change in risk-standardised 30-day readmission rate (RSRR), wrote Elizabeth Bradley, PhD, of Yale University, and colleagues in the study published online in Circulation: Cardiovascular Quality and Outcomes.

    Read more

     

  • Report suggests 6 strategies to prevent heart failure readmissions
    MedPage Today, 18 July 2013

    Hundreds of millions of dollars could be saved if hospitals implemented six strategies aimed at reducing heart failure readmissions, a large national sample of hospitals revealed.

    Individually, the six strategies had a modest but still significant size effect ranging from 0.34 to 0.18 percentage points change in risk-standardised 30-day readmission rate (RSRR), wrote Elizabeth Bradley, PhD, of Yale University, and colleagues in the study published online in Circulation: Cardiovascular Quality and Outcomes.

    Read more

     

  • Availability of cardiac CT streamlines cath lab use, lowers costs
    theHeart.org, 17 July 2013

    In a study of young individuals seen at a military center who had chest pain but were at low to moderate risk of having an MI, the percentage of patients sent for invasive coronary angiography (ICA) dropped by 62% after cardiac computed tomography (CT) became available.

    Read more

     

  • Availability of cardiac CT streamlines cath lab use, lowers costs
    theHeart.org, 17 July 2013

    In a study of young individuals seen at a military center who had chest pain but were at low to moderate risk of having an MI, the percentage of patients sent for invasive coronary angiography (ICA) dropped by 62% after cardiac computed tomography (CT) became available.

    Read more

     

  • Visceral fat adds (a little) to BMI prediction of CV risk: Framingham analysis
    theHeart.org, 16 July 2013

    Visceral adiposity as measured by multidetector computed tomography (CT) was positively and independently correlated with risk of CVD events and incident cancer in a Framingham Heart Study cohort clinically free of both types of disease at baseline [1]. Follow-up extended as long as 7.4 years with a median of five years.

    Read more

     

  • Visceral fat adds (a little) to BMI prediction of CV risk: Framingham analysis
    theHeart.org, 16 July 2013

    Visceral adiposity as measured by multidetector computed tomography (CT) was positively and independently correlated with risk of CVD events and incident cancer in a Framingham Heart Study cohort clinically free of both types of disease at baseline [1]. Follow-up extended as long as 7.4 years with a median of five years.

    Read more

     

  • John Hopkins Hospital (USA) again tops hospital rankings
    MedPage Today, 16 July 2013

    Some hospitals have more expertise than others when it comes to caring for patients with life-threatening or rare conditions. And people facing such health challenges need every bit of help they can get. That's why U.S. News & World Report publishes annual rankings of the nation's best hospitals.

    Read more

     

  • John Hopkins Hospital (USA) again tops hospital rankings
    MedPage Today, 16 July 2013

    Some hospitals have more expertise than others when it comes to caring for patients with life-threatening or rare conditions. And people facing such health challenges need every bit of help they can get. That's why U.S. News & World Report publishes annual rankings of the nation's best hospitals.

    Read more

     

  • Beta-blockers in HF get bum rap for most "side effects," says study
    theHeart.org, 12 July 2013

    By a wide margin, most adverse side effects attributed to beta-blockers in randomized, controlled heart-failure trials weren't significantly more common with the drugs than they were with placebo, conclude researchers based on a meta-analysis.

    "The majority of adverse effects reported with beta-blockers in heart failure are not caused by the beta-blockers per se but arise either from the disease itself, another coincident problem, or from the power of suggestion—the nocebo phenomenon," write the authors, led by Dr Anthony J Barron (St Mary's Hospital, Imperial College Healthcare NHS Trust, London, UK).

    Read more

     

  • Beta-blockers in HF get bum rap for most "side effects," says study
    theHeart.org, 12 July 2013

    By a wide margin, most adverse side effects attributed to beta-blockers in randomized, controlled heart-failure trials weren't significantly more common with the drugs than they were with placebo, conclude researchers based on a meta-analysis.

    "The majority of adverse effects reported with beta-blockers in heart failure are not caused by the beta-blockers per se but arise either from the disease itself, another coincident problem, or from the power of suggestion—the nocebo phenomenon," write the authors, led by Dr Anthony J Barron (St Mary's Hospital, Imperial College Healthcare NHS Trust, London, UK).

    Read more

     

  • Wide variations in CV care: A wake-up call for cardiologists
    theHeart.org, 9 July 2013

    If you are a cardiologist in the US, today's issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association will make for tough reading. Two articles shine a bright light on blemishes in practice patterns.

    Read more

     

  • A new era in the treatment of PE and DVT: Confirmation from AMPLIFY
    theHeart.org, 8 July 2013

    The solid results of the AMPLIFY trial mean that apixaban will likely soon be approved as the second novel oral anticoagulant—alongside rivaroxaban—for the treatment of PE and DVT. Dr Samuel Goldhaber gives his review of the trial and thoughts on why it's exciting to be practicing today in the field of thrombosis.

    Read more

     

  • A new era in the treatment of PE and DVT: Confirmation from AMPLIFY
    theHeart.org, 8 July 2013

    The solid results of the AMPLIFY trial mean that apixaban will likely soon be approved as the second novel oral anticoagulant—alongside rivaroxaban—for the treatment of PE and DVT. Dr Samuel Goldhaber gives his review of the trial and thoughts on why it's exciting to be practicing today in the field of thrombosis.

    Read more

     

  • NICE seeks members for technologies committee
    News Source, 11/07/2013

    The National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) is recruiting members to join its four independent advisory Appraisal Committees. The Appraisal Committees consider and interpret evidence on the clinical and cost effectiveness of health technologies and formulates recommendations on their use.

    Members of all Committees are drawn from the NHS, healthcare professionals, patients and carers, and the academic world. Committee members are not appointed to act as representatives of a particular organisation.

    They will be expected to apply the experience and judgement from their individual backgrounds to the topics considered by the Committee and in doing so actively contribute to improving the quality and consistency of care provided by the NHS. They will be helping the Institute make some of the most difficult decisions in public life.

    Read more

     

  • NICE seeks members for technologies committee
    News Source, 11/07/2013

    The National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) is recruiting members to join its four independent advisory Appraisal Committees. The Appraisal Committees consider and interpret evidence on the clinical and cost effectiveness of health technologies and formulates recommendations on their use.

    Members of all Committees are drawn from the NHS, healthcare professionals, patients and carers, and the academic world. Committee members are not appointed to act as representatives of a particular organisation.

    They will be expected to apply the experience and judgement from their individual backgrounds to the topics considered by the Committee and in doing so actively contribute to improving the quality and consistency of care provided by the NHS. They will be helping the Institute make some of the most difficult decisions in public life.

    Read more

     

  • LARIAT prevents stroke in patients intolerant to blood thinners
    News Medical, 3 July 2013

    Jersey Shore University Medical Center is one of only a handful of hospitals in the country offering the recent FDA-approved LARIAT Suture Delivery Device procedure. Electrophysiologists and interventional cardiologists perform this innovative procedure to help prevent stroke in patients who suffer from atrial fibrillation and are unable to take blood thinners.

     

    Read more

     

  • LARIAT prevents stroke in patients intolerant to blood thinners
    News Medical, 3 July 2013

    Jersey Shore University Medical Center is one of only a handful of hospitals in the country offering the recent FDA-approved LARIAT Suture Delivery Device procedure. Electrophysiologists and interventional cardiologists perform this innovative procedure to help prevent stroke in patients who suffer from atrial fibrillation and are unable to take blood thinners.

     

    Read more

     

  • NICE recruiting Chairs of new social care guidance development groups
    NICE, 2 July 2013

    NICE has commissioned the NICE Collaborating Centre for Social Care (NCCSC), hosted by the Social Care Institute for Excellence (SCIE), to produce the social care guidance on the social care of older people with more than one physical or mental health long term condition in residential or community settings (“Older people with long-term conditions”). NICE has also commissioned the NCCSC to produce the social care guidance on ‘Co-ordinated transition between social care and health care services' (“Health and social care transitions”). The NCCSC is seeking to recruit two Chairs, each to lead one of these Guidance Development Groups (GDGs).

    The deadline for applications for both positions is: Friday 12 July 2013

    Read more

     

  • NICE recruiting Chairs of new social care guidance development groups
    NICE, 2 July 2013

    NICE has commissioned the NICE Collaborating Centre for Social Care (NCCSC), hosted by the Social Care Institute for Excellence (SCIE), to produce the social care guidance on the social care of older people with more than one physical or mental health long term condition in residential or community settings (“Older people with long-term conditions”). NICE has also commissioned the NCCSC to produce the social care guidance on ‘Co-ordinated transition between social care and health care services' (“Health and social care transitions”). The NCCSC is seeking to recruit two Chairs, each to lead one of these Guidance Development Groups (GDGs).

    The deadline for applications for both positions is: Friday 12 July 2013

    Read more

     

  • NICE recruiting members for the standing committee
    NICE, 1 July 2013

    The NICE Board has asked the Centre for Clinical Practice to develop a pilot programme to carry out rapid updates of aspects of its clinical guidelines that need updating as identified through a review process. Therefore they are seeking to recruit a standing advisory committee to NICE to assist in updating our clinical guidance.

    Read more

     

  • NICE recruiting members for the standing committee
    NICE, 1 July 2013

    The NICE Board has asked the Centre for Clinical Practice to develop a pilot programme to carry out rapid updates of aspects of its clinical guidelines that need updating as identified through a review process. Therefore they are seeking to recruit a standing advisory committee to NICE to assist in updating our clinical guidance.

    Read more

     

  • Guidance recently published by NICE
    NICE, 1 July 2013

    The assessment and prevention of falls in older people

    Rivaroxaban for treating pulmonary embolism and preventing recurrent venous thromboembolism

    Read more

     

  • NHS Wales: The Listening Organisation
    NHS Wales, June 2013

    A new white paper from 1000 Lives Plus explains how listening to patients and understanding what it feels like to experience care is a key way for NHS Wales can improve its services.

    The Listening Organisation, which was officially launched at the 1000 Lives Plus National Learning Event on 11 June 2013 by David Sissling, Chief Executive of NHS Wales will support organisations as they seek to ensure patient views are listened to and acted on, in order to improve services.

    The Welsh Government has placed improving patient and user experience at the heart of its plans for NHS Wales. There is a commitment that patients will be listened to and that feedback on patient and user experience will be obtained, published and acted upon by NHS Wales health boards and trusts.

    There is a growing emphasis on “co-production”, the partnership between providers and the public and the involvement of patients and citizens in the design and delivery of services. The recent proposed changes to NHS Wales offer a prime example of how reengineering healthcare systems can be a collaborative effort between the people of Wales and the NHS.

    Download 'The Listening Oranisation' white paper here

    Read more

     

  • Guidance recently published by NICE
    NICE, 1 July 2013

    The assessment and prevention of falls in older people

    Rivaroxaban for treating pulmonary embolism and preventing recurrent venous thromboembolism

    Read more

     

  • Funding to develop new anticoagulant
    Cambridge University, 28 June 2013

    A new spin-out company from the University of Cambridge and Addenbrooke’s Hospital, XO1 Ltd, has raised $11 million in funding to develop a new anticoagulant drug which has the potential to save millions of lives by preventing heart attacks and strokes without causing bleeding.

    The funding, from leading life science investor Index Ventures, will be used to develop ichorcumab, an antibody invented by researchers from the University and Addenbrooke’s, which targets thrombin, the enzyme responsible for blood clotting.

    Read more

     

  • Funding to develop new anticoagulant
    Cambridge University, 28 June 2013

    A new spin-out company from the University of Cambridge and Addenbrooke’s Hospital, XO1 Ltd, has raised $11 million in funding to develop a new anticoagulant drug which has the potential to save millions of lives by preventing heart attacks and strokes without causing bleeding.

    The funding, from leading life science investor Index Ventures, will be used to develop ichorcumab, an antibody invented by researchers from the University and Addenbrooke’s, which targets thrombin, the enzyme responsible for blood clotting.

    Read more

     

  • NICE publishes final scope on self monitoring coagulometers
    NICE, 28 June 2013

    The Final Scope and Final Assessment Protocol for Self-monitoring coagulometers (CoaguChek XS system, INRatio2 PT/INR monitor and ProTime Microcoagulation system), for self-testing or self-managing coagulation status in people for whom long-term vitamin K antagonist therapy is intended have been published on the NICE website.

    Read more

     

  • NICE publishes final scope on self monitoring coagulometers
    NICE, 28 June 2013

    The Final Scope and Final Assessment Protocol for Self-monitoring coagulometers (CoaguChek XS system, INRatio2 PT/INR monitor and ProTime Microcoagulation system), for self-testing or self-managing coagulation status in people for whom long-term vitamin K antagonist therapy is intended have been published on the NICE website.

    Read more

     

  • NHS Wales: The Listening Organisation
    NHS Wales, June 2013

    A new white paper from 1000 Lives Plus explains how listening to patients and understanding what it feels like to experience care is a key way for NHS Wales can improve its services.

    The Listening Organisation, which was officially launched at the 1000 Lives Plus National Learning Event on 11 June 2013 by David Sissling, Chief Executive of NHS Wales will support organisations as they seek to ensure patient views are listened to and acted on, in order to improve services.

    The Welsh Government has placed improving patient and user experience at the heart of its plans for NHS Wales. There is a commitment that patients will be listened to and that feedback on patient and user experience will be obtained, published and acted upon by NHS Wales health boards and trusts.

    There is a growing emphasis on “co-production”, the partnership between providers and the public and the involvement of patients and citizens in the design and delivery of services. The recent proposed changes to NHS Wales offer a prime example of how reengineering healthcare systems can be a collaborative effort between the people of Wales and the NHS.

    Download 'The Listening Oranisation' white paper here

    Read more

     

  • Catheter ablation more effective - study suggests
    News Medical, 26 Jun 2013

    Using catheter ablation to create complete linear lesions around pulmonary veins, proved more effective than the creation of incomplete lesions in preventing recurrence of atrial fibrillation (AF), reports the GAP-AF study.

    Read more

     

  • Catheter ablation more effective - study suggests
    News Medical, 26 Jun 2013

    Using catheter ablation to create complete linear lesions around pulmonary veins, proved more effective than the creation of incomplete lesions in preventing recurrence of atrial fibrillation (AF), reports the GAP-AF study.

    Read more

     

  • Study reveals affect of eating fish on AF
    Health Canal, 26 Jun 2013

    Moderation seems to be key when it comes to eating fish to prevent atrial fibrillation (AF) according to an observational study presented at the EHRA EUROPACE congress held 23 to 26 June in Athens, Greece. 

    Read more

     

  • Study reveals affect of eating fish on AF
    Health Canal, 26 Jun 2013

    Moderation seems to be key when it comes to eating fish to prevent atrial fibrillation (AF) according to an observational study presented at the EHRA EUROPACE congress held 23 to 26 June in Athens, Greece. 

    Read more

     

  • Sullivan Cuff Software Ltd succeeds with two key information Governance achievements
    INRstar, 25 June 2013

    INRstar N3 users across the country are enjoying peace of mind knowing that their Clinical Decision Support Software (CDSS) for anticoagulation meets all relevant CQC registration criteria.

    INRstar N3 now complies with Outcome 11 of the CQC registration criteria, is registered as a CE marked device, and is fully compliant with the Medical Device Directive (93/42/EEC). SCSL is formally accredited to ISO 27001 and NHS Connecting for Health Information Governance Toolkit (IGT) Level 3 standards for information security.

    Read more

     

  • Sullivan Cuff Software Ltd succeeds with two key information Governance achievements
    INRstar, 25 June 2013

    INRstar N3 users across the country are enjoying peace of mind knowing that their Clinical Decision Support Software (CDSS) for anticoagulation meets all relevant CQC registration criteria.

    INRstar N3 now complies with Outcome 11 of the CQC registration criteria, is registered as a CE marked device, and is fully compliant with the Medical Device Directive (93/42/EEC). SCSL is formally accredited to ISO 27001 and NHS Connecting for Health Information Governance Toolkit (IGT) Level 3 standards for information security.

    Read more

     

  • New video explains how role of warfarin has changed
    MedPage Today, 25 June 2013

    The choice of an anticoagulant strategy in patients with atrial fibrillation has got more complicated with the arrival of novel anticoagulants. Warfarin has advantages and disadvantages, while the newer agents have their own set of pros and cons. One size does not fit all patients.
    Hear an expert discuss the anticoagulant choice.

    Read more

     

  • New video explains how role of warfarin has changed
    MedPage Today, 25 June 2013

    The choice of an anticoagulant strategy in patients with atrial fibrillation has got more complicated with the arrival of novel anticoagulants. Warfarin has advantages and disadvantages, while the newer agents have their own set of pros and cons. One size does not fit all patients.
    Hear an expert discuss the anticoagulant choice.

    Read more

     

  • NICE Annual Conference report and plans for 2014 event
    NICE, 25 June 2013

    This year's NICE Annual Conference brought to the forefront a number of new ideas, the response to the recent structural changes, the latest in practical ideas for implementation and vital updates that will help shape your role for the year ahead.

    Read more

     

  • NICE Annual Conference report and plans for 2014 event
    NICE, 25 June 2013

    This year's NICE Annual Conference brought to the forefront a number of new ideas, the response to the recent structural changes, the latest in practical ideas for implementation and vital updates that will help shape your role for the year ahead.

    Read more

     

  • AliveCor Heart Monitor available for iPhone5
    The Wall Street Journal, 24 June 2013

    AliveCor, Inc., a premier digital health company, announced today that its Heart Monitor for iPhone 4, 4S and 5 is now available for purchase in the United Kingdom and Ireland. To support the launch, the AliveCor Heart Monitor will be on display at the European Heart Rhythm Association (EHRA) Europace 2013 meeting (booth number H3-B220) in Athens, Greece, beginning June 23. It is the first CE-marked mobile device--based ECG monitor that is used to record, display, store and transfer single-channel electrocardiogram (ECG) rhythms. It is available to medical professionals, patients, and health-conscious individuals at Amazon.co.uk.

    Read more

     

  • AliveCor Heart Monitor available for iPhone5
    The Wall Street Journal, 24 June 2013

    AliveCor, Inc., a premier digital health company, announced today that its Heart Monitor for iPhone 4, 4S and 5 is now available for purchase in the United Kingdom and Ireland. To support the launch, the AliveCor Heart Monitor will be on display at the European Heart Rhythm Association (EHRA) Europace 2013 meeting (booth number H3-B220) in Athens, Greece, beginning June 23. It is the first CE-marked mobile device--based ECG monitor that is used to record, display, store and transfer single-channel electrocardiogram (ECG) rhythms. It is available to medical professionals, patients, and health-conscious individuals at Amazon.co.uk.

    Read more

     

  • Depression screening recommended in study
    HealthCanal, 24 Jun 2013

    Electrophysiologists (EPs) rate the quality of life of patients with Paroxysmal atrial fibrillation (AF) significantly better than the patients themselves do, with the greatest level of disagreement about mental health. The abstract study,¹ presented at the EHRA EUROPACE meeting, 23 to 26 June, in Athens, Greece, found that patients with paroxysmal AF, even in the absence of significant concomitant cardiac disease, showed signs of depression, sleeping disorders and low levels of physical activity.

    Read more

     

  • Depression screening recommended in study
    HealthCanal, 24 Jun 2013

    Electrophysiologists (EPs) rate the quality of life of patients with Paroxysmal atrial fibrillation (AF) significantly better than the patients themselves do, with the greatest level of disagreement about mental health. The abstract study,¹ presented at the EHRA EUROPACE meeting, 23 to 26 June, in Athens, Greece, found that patients with paroxysmal AF, even in the absence of significant concomitant cardiac disease, showed signs of depression, sleeping disorders and low levels of physical activity.

    Read more

     

  • Surgical procedure improving treatment of AF
    ArkLatex, 24 Jun 2013

    A 59-year-old Brunswick retiree has had atrial fibrillation for the last 30 years of his life, but that is all about to change.
    Atrial fibrillation is the most common type of abnormal heart rhythm and the leading cause of stroke. At St. Vincent's Healthcare, doctors are using a procedure to treat Afib that is minimally invasive and reduces surgical radiation. It is called catheter ablation.

    Read more

     

  • Surgical procedure improving treatment of AF
    ArkLatex, 24 Jun 2013

    A 59-year-old Brunswick retiree has had atrial fibrillation for the last 30 years of his life, but that is all about to change.
    Atrial fibrillation is the most common type of abnormal heart rhythm and the leading cause of stroke. At St. Vincent's Healthcare, doctors are using a procedure to treat Afib that is minimally invasive and reduces surgical radiation. It is called catheter ablation.

    Read more

     

  • Dabigatran 110 mg similar in benefit to 150 mg in weighted analysis
    theHeart.org, 21 June 2013

    Reigniting a smoldering debate, a new analysis based largely on data from the RE-LY trial has found similar overall benefits to the higher and lower doses of dabigatran (Pradaxa, Boehringer Ingelheim) studied in that trial.

    European, Canadian, and Australian regulators all approved both the 110-mg and 150-mg twice-daily doses studied in RE-LY, while the FDA approved only the higher dose. (The FDA also approved a 75-mg dose for patients with severe renal impairment, although this dose was not studied in RELY.) As Dr John W Eikelboom (McMaster University, Hamilton, ON) and colleagues note in their paper, the FDA's controversial decision was based on the view that the reduction in bleeding seen with the lower dose was "clearly less significant for patients" than the reduction in stroke seen with the higher dose; the FDA also was "unable to find any population for whom the availability of a lower dose would improve dabigatran's benefit/risk profile."

    Read more

     

  • Dabigatran 110 mg similar in benefit to 150 mg in weighted analysis
    theHeart.org, 21 June 2013

    Reigniting a smoldering debate, a new analysis based largely on data from the RE-LY trial has found similar overall benefits to the higher and lower doses of dabigatran (Pradaxa, Boehringer Ingelheim) studied in that trial.

    European, Canadian, and Australian regulators all approved both the 110-mg and 150-mg twice-daily doses studied in RE-LY, while the FDA approved only the higher dose. (The FDA also approved a 75-mg dose for patients with severe renal impairment, although this dose was not studied in RELY.) As Dr John W Eikelboom (McMaster University, Hamilton, ON) and colleagues note in their paper, the FDA's controversial decision was based on the view that the reduction in bleeding seen with the lower dose was "clearly less significant for patients" than the reduction in stroke seen with the higher dose; the FDA also was "unable to find any population for whom the availability of a lower dose would improve dabigatran's benefit/risk profile."

    Read more

     

  • ICD not to blame for higher CV mortality after shock
    Medage, 19 June 2013

    Certain inappropriate shocks from an implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD) are associated with an increased mortality risk, but it may be the underlying arrhythmia that is more detrimental to patient health, the observational ALTITUDE study found.

    Read more

     

  • ICD not to blame for higher CV mortality after shock
    Medage, 19 June 2013

    Certain inappropriate shocks from an implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD) are associated with an increased mortality risk, but it may be the underlying arrhythmia that is more detrimental to patient health, the observational ALTITUDE study found.

    Read more

     

  • UK scientists win funding for new kind of anticoagulant drug
    Reuters, 16 June 2013

    British scientists have won early financial backing for a new kind of anticoagulant drug they believe may prevent dangerous blood clots without causing bleeding - a previously unachievable goal.

    Index Ventures, working with GlaxoSmithKline and Johnson & Johnson via an early-stage biotech fund, said on Monday it was investing $11 million in XO1, a new company set up to develop the experimental medicine.

    Called ichorcumab, the new drug is still miles from reaching the market - clinical trials are only slated to start within the next two years - but the product may create a stir in a commercially important field, given its unusual properties.

    Read more

     

  • Pharmacist anticoagulation program increases patient satisfaction
    Pharmacy Times, 12 June 2013

    Survey results from Henry Ford Hospital in Detroit suggest that an inpatient pharmacist-directed anticoagulation service increases patient satisfaction and may boost Medicare reimbursement as well.

    Anticoagulation services directed by a team of pharmacists appear to significantly increase patient satisfaction scores compared with conventional services directed by a primary care team with access to a clinical pharmacist, according to the results of a study published online on May 8, 2013, in the Annals of Pharmacotherapy.

    Since 2008, inpatient anticoagulation services at Henry Ford Hospital in Detroit have been directed by a team of pharmacists that is responsible for dosing, monitoring, and educating all hospitalized patients receiving anticoagulants (including warfarin) and making sure that patients transition safely from the hospital to an outpatient setting on discharge. Pharmacists on the team also determine doses for patients receiving direct thrombin inhibitors and monitor patients receiving enoxaparin, heparin, and the new oral anticoagulants, adjusting doses as needed.

    Pharmacists on the team receive extensive initial training in anticoagulation, undergo periodic assessment of their anticoagulation management competency, and spend all their time attending to patients receiving anticoagulation. (Previously, any pharmacist could provide patient education regarding anticoagulation.) As a result, risk of bleeding and thrombosis has decreased by 5%, and the success rate of patients transitioning from hospital to outpatient settings has been greater than 70%.

    For the current study, a research team led by James Kalus, PharmD, senior clinical pharmacy manager at Henry Ford Hospital, conducted a survey of patients who received inpatient anticoagulation therapy at the hospital to determine how the pharmacist-directed anticoagulation service (PDAS) had affected patient satisfaction. Surveys were mailed to 1694 patients after discharge, and 687 responded. Results were compared for patients treated under the conventional model from February 2001 through April 2007 with those treated under the PDAS model from December 2008 through December 2010. (Of 1245 patients treated using the conventional model, 528 responded; of 449 patients treated under the PDAS model, 159 responded.)

    The results of the 5-question survey indicated that, under the PDAS model, patients’ overall satisfaction with medical care increased 10.6%, satisfaction with the amount of information communicated to patients increased 37.2%, satisfaction with the clarity of communication regarding drug therapy increased 35.2%, and satisfaction with the quality of answers to patient questions increased 29.5%. In addition, 71.1% of those treated under the PDAS model recalled speaking with a pharmacist during their hospital stay, compared with 28.0% of those treated under the conventional model. Within the PDAS treatment group, those who recalled speaking with a pharmacist reported significantly higher levels of satisfaction with their treatment than those who did not.

    Read more

     

  • UK scientists win funding for new kind of anticoagulant drug
    Reuters, 16 June 2013

    British scientists have won early financial backing for a new kind of anticoagulant drug they believe may prevent dangerous blood clots without causing bleeding - a previously unachievable goal.

    Index Ventures, working with GlaxoSmithKline and Johnson & Johnson via an early-stage biotech fund, said on Monday it was investing $11 million in XO1, a new company set up to develop the experimental medicine.

    Called ichorcumab, the new drug is still miles from reaching the market - clinical trials are only slated to start within the next two years - but the product may create a stir in a commercially important field, given its unusual properties.

    Read more

     

  • Stroke top worry in outpatient Afib therapy choices
    MedPage, 14 June 2013

    Stroke risk, not risk of bleeding, drove the use of oral anticoagulants in outpatients with atrial fibrillation (Afib), a finding in contrast to hospitalized patients, researchers found.

    As the risk of stroke rose from low (CHADS2 score of 0) to high (CHADS2 score of 2 or greater), so did the percentage of patients taking oral anticoagulants (53% versus 80%, P<0.001), according to Michael W. Cullen, MD, assistant professor of medicine at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn., and colleagues.

    Read more

     

  • Stroke top worry in outpatient Afib therapy choices
    MedPage, 14 June 2013

    Stroke risk, not risk of bleeding, drove the use of oral anticoagulants in outpatients with atrial fibrillation (Afib), a finding in contrast to hospitalized patients, researchers found.

    As the risk of stroke rose from low (CHADS2 score of 0) to high (CHADS2 score of 2 or greater), so did the percentage of patients taking oral anticoagulants (53% versus 80%, P<0.001), according to Michael W. Cullen, MD, assistant professor of medicine at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn., and colleagues.

    Read more

     

  • Air pollution can trigger heart arrhythmias: study
    Reuters, 13 June 2013

    For people with existing heart problems, exposure to high levels of air pollution can trigger the irregular heartbeats that may lead to a stroke or heart attack, according to a new study.

    Past research has linked air pollution to ventricular fibrillation, electrical confusion in the lower chambers of the heart which can cause sudden death.

    The new study also finds an association with atrial fibrillation (AF), erratic quivering in the heart's upper chambers and the most common type of irregular heartbeat.

    Read more

     

  • Air pollution can trigger heart arrhythmias: study
    Reuters, 13 June 2013

    For people with existing heart problems, exposure to high levels of air pollution can trigger the irregular heartbeats that may lead to a stroke or heart attack, according to a new study.

    Past research has linked air pollution to ventricular fibrillation, electrical confusion in the lower chambers of the heart which can cause sudden death.

    The new study also finds an association with atrial fibrillation (AF), erratic quivering in the heart's upper chambers and the most common type of irregular heartbeat.

    Read more

     

  • Cross-country skiers may be at higher risk for irregular heartbeat
    CBS News, 12 June 2013

    The best and most accomplished cross-country skiers may be at greater risk of developing heart arrhythmias, potentially life-threatening problems with the rhythm of a heart beat.

    A new study published on June 12 in the European Heart Journal showed that out of cross country skiers that completed Sweden's challenging Vasaloppet -- an almost 56-mile grueling course -- those that completed the most races and had the fastest finishing times had a higher chance of developing atrial fibrillation (abnormally fast heart beat) or bradyarrhythmias (abnormally slow heartbeat).

    The study did not find a direct causal link between skiing and heart problems, however.

    Read more

     

  • Cross-country skiers may be at higher risk for irregular heartbeat
    CBS News, 12 June 2013

    The best and most accomplished cross-country skiers may be at greater risk of developing heart arrhythmias, potentially life-threatening problems with the rhythm of a heart beat.

    A new study published on June 12 in the European Heart Journal showed that out of cross country skiers that completed Sweden's challenging Vasaloppet -- an almost 56-mile grueling course -- those that completed the most races and had the fastest finishing times had a higher chance of developing atrial fibrillation (abnormally fast heart beat) or bradyarrhythmias (abnormally slow heartbeat).

    The study did not find a direct causal link between skiing and heart problems, however.

    Read more

     

  • Pharmacist anticoagulation program increases patient satisfaction
    Pharmacy Times, 12 June 2013

    Survey results from Henry Ford Hospital in Detroit suggest that an inpatient pharmacist-directed anticoagulation service increases patient satisfaction and may boost Medicare reimbursement as well.

    Anticoagulation services directed by a team of pharmacists appear to significantly increase patient satisfaction scores compared with conventional services directed by a primary care team with access to a clinical pharmacist, according to the results of a study published online on May 8, 2013, in the Annals of Pharmacotherapy.

    Since 2008, inpatient anticoagulation services at Henry Ford Hospital in Detroit have been directed by a team of pharmacists that is responsible for dosing, monitoring, and educating all hospitalized patients receiving anticoagulants (including warfarin) and making sure that patients transition safely from the hospital to an outpatient setting on discharge. Pharmacists on the team also determine doses for patients receiving direct thrombin inhibitors and monitor patients receiving enoxaparin, heparin, and the new oral anticoagulants, adjusting doses as needed.

    Pharmacists on the team receive extensive initial training in anticoagulation, undergo periodic assessment of their anticoagulation management competency, and spend all their time attending to patients receiving anticoagulation. (Previously, any pharmacist could provide patient education regarding anticoagulation.) As a result, risk of bleeding and thrombosis has decreased by 5%, and the success rate of patients transitioning from hospital to outpatient settings has been greater than 70%.

    For the current study, a research team led by James Kalus, PharmD, senior clinical pharmacy manager at Henry Ford Hospital, conducted a survey of patients who received inpatient anticoagulation therapy at the hospital to determine how the pharmacist-directed anticoagulation service (PDAS) had affected patient satisfaction. Surveys were mailed to 1694 patients after discharge, and 687 responded. Results were compared for patients treated under the conventional model from February 2001 through April 2007 with those treated under the PDAS model from December 2008 through December 2010. (Of 1245 patients treated using the conventional model, 528 responded; of 449 patients treated under the PDAS model, 159 responded.)

    The results of the 5-question survey indicated that, under the PDAS model, patients’ overall satisfaction with medical care increased 10.6%, satisfaction with the amount of information communicated to patients increased 37.2%, satisfaction with the clarity of communication regarding drug therapy increased 35.2%, and satisfaction with the quality of answers to patient questions increased 29.5%. In addition, 71.1% of those treated under the PDAS model recalled speaking with a pharmacist during their hospital stay, compared with 28.0% of those treated under the conventional model. Within the PDAS treatment group, those who recalled speaking with a pharmacist reported significantly higher levels of satisfaction with their treatment than those who did not.

    Read more

     

  • Jersey to become an eHealth hub?
    Jersey Post, 12 June 2013

    During Arrhythmia Alliance's 'Heart Rhythm Week', Jersey Hospital trialled the AliveCor Heart Monitor that can be attached to an iPhone and give ECG readings.

    The hospital managed to screen 1,000 people and detected several arrhythmias.

    This featured in the Jersey Evening Post.

    Read more

     

  • Jersey to become an eHealth hub?
    Jersey Post, 12 June 2013

    During Arrhythmia Alliance's 'Heart Rhythm Week', Jersey Hospital trialled the AliveCor Heart Monitor that can be attached to an iPhone and give ECG readings.

    The hospital managed to screen 1,000 people and detected several arrhythmias.

    This featured in the Jersey Evening Post.

    Read more

     

  • NICE seeks members for Highly Specialised Technologies Evaluation Committee
    NICE, 11 June 2013

    NICE is recruiting new members to join its Highly Specialised Technologies Evaluation Committee. The Highly Specialised Technologies Evaluation Committee will consider a small number of medicines aimed at treating patients with very rare diseases and very complex healthcare needs. This Committee will evaluate the benefits and costs of these medicines in the context of national (that is, direct) commissioning by NHS England.

    Read more

     

  • NICE seeks members for Highly Specialised Technologies Evaluation Committee
    NICE, 11 June 2013

    NICE is recruiting new members to join its Highly Specialised Technologies Evaluation Committee. The Highly Specialised Technologies Evaluation Committee will consider a small number of medicines aimed at treating patients with very rare diseases and very complex healthcare needs. This Committee will evaluate the benefits and costs of these medicines in the context of national (that is, direct) commissioning by NHS England.

    Read more

     

  • AF and stroke report launched in Parliament
    AFA, 11 June 2013

    The AF Association launched an interactive AF report in Parliament on 11 June 2013, in partnership with Boehringer Ingelheim.

    MPs, clinicians and patients were invited to attend the unveiling of the AF Infographic, including Public Health Minister, Anna Soubry MP; APGAF Chair, Glyn Davies MP and AF Association Trustee, Professor A. John Camm.

    The AF Infographic gives a regional breakdown of:

    •     AF prevalance
    •     how many people are recommended to be on anticoagulation therapy
    •     how many are prescribed anticoagulants
    •     estimated number of strokes a year
    •     how much the NHS could save with appropriate anticoagulation treatment

      View the AF Infographic by clicking on the map.

     

    AF Association CEO, Trudie Lobban    APGAF Chair, Glyn Davies MP             AF Infographic demonstrated to guests
    MBE, Public Health Minister, Anna
    Soubry MP and AF Association
    Trustee, Professor A. John Camm

    Read more

     

  • Implementation of the Health and Social Care Act 2012
    11th June 2013

    The Health Committee will hold its second oral evidence session on the Implementation of the Health and Social Care Act 2012 as follows:

    Date: Tuesday 11 June 2013, 9:30am
    Location: Room 15, Main Committee Corridor, Palace of Westminster The meeting will be televised.

    Witnesses: Dr David Bennett, Chairman and Chief Exececutive, Monitor Dr Johnny Marshall, Director of Policy, NHS Confederation Andrew Webster, Associate Director Integrated Care, Local Government Association. Parliamentary website

    Health Committee website
    Parliamentary website

    Read more

     

  • AF and stroke report launched in Parliament
    AFA, 11 June 2013

    The AF Association launched an interactive AF report in Parliament on 11 June 2013, in partnership with Boehringer Ingelheim.

    MPs, clinicians and patients were invited to attend the unveiling of the AF Infographic, including Public Health Minister, Anna Soubry MP; APGAF Chair, Glyn Davies MP and AF Association Trustee, Professor A. John Camm.

    The AF Infographic gives a regional breakdown of:

    •     AF prevalance
    •     how many people are recommended to be on anticoagulation therapy
    •     how many are prescribed anticoagulants
    •     estimated number of strokes a year
    •     how much the NHS could save with appropriate anticoagulation treatment

      View the AF Infographic by clicking on the map.

     

    AF Association CEO, Trudie Lobban    APGAF Chair, Glyn Davies MP             AF Infographic demonstrated to guests
    MBE, Public Health Minister, Anna
    Soubry MP and AF Association
    Trustee, Professor A. John Camm

    Read more

     

  • Aspirin unneeded with anticoagulation/clopidogrel after MI, PCI in AF
    theHeart.org, 6 June 2013

    The addition of one antiplatelet agent to oral anticoagulation is sufficient in patients with atrial fibrillation (AF) who experience an MI or PCI, and the antiplatelet agent probably should be clopidogrel instead of aspirin, concluded a study of >12 000 patients from nationwide registries in Denmark.

    Despite the common recommendation for triple antithrombotic therapy in patients with multiple indications for antithrombotic therapy, which would have added aspirin into the mix, "Our data suggest that triple-therapy-management regimens might be replaced with oral anticoagulation and clopidogrel without any additional risk of recurrent thrombotic events and a lower risk of bleeding," according to the authors, led by Dr Morten Lamberts (Copenhagen University Hospital Gentofte, Hellerup, Denmark).

    Their findings, published online June 4, 2013 in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology, are based on data from 2001-2009, when oral anticoagulation meant vitamin-K antagonists like warfarin and clopidogrel was the state-of-the-art oral antiplatelet.

    Read more

     

  • Aspirin unneeded with anticoagulation/clopidogrel after MI, PCI in AF
    theHeart.org, 6 June 2013

    The addition of one antiplatelet agent to oral anticoagulation is sufficient in patients with atrial fibrillation (AF) who experience an MI or PCI, and the antiplatelet agent probably should be clopidogrel instead of aspirin, concluded a study of >12 000 patients from nationwide registries in Denmark.

    Despite the common recommendation for triple antithrombotic therapy in patients with multiple indications for antithrombotic therapy, which would have added aspirin into the mix, "Our data suggest that triple-therapy-management regimens might be replaced with oral anticoagulation and clopidogrel without any additional risk of recurrent thrombotic events and a lower risk of bleeding," according to the authors, led by Dr Morten Lamberts (Copenhagen University Hospital Gentofte, Hellerup, Denmark).

    Their findings, published online June 4, 2013 in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology, are based on data from 2001-2009, when oral anticoagulation meant vitamin-K antagonists like warfarin and clopidogrel was the state-of-the-art oral antiplatelet.

    Read more

     

  • Implementation of the Health and Social Care Act 2012
    11th June 2013

    The Health Committee will hold its second oral evidence session on the Implementation of the Health and Social Care Act 2012 as follows:

    Date: Tuesday 11 June 2013, 9:30am
    Location: Room 15, Main Committee Corridor, Palace of Westminster The meeting will be televised.

    Witnesses: Dr David Bennett, Chairman and Chief Exececutive, Monitor Dr Johnny Marshall, Director of Policy, NHS Confederation Andrew Webster, Associate Director Integrated Care, Local Government Association. Parliamentary website

    Health Committee website
    Parliamentary website

    Read more

     

  • INRstar interfaces to EMIS, INPS and TPP systems
    INRstar, 14 May 2013

    INRstar, the UK market leader for anticoagulation management software, has developed new interfaces to three of the market leading GP clinical systems - EMIS’s LV, PCS and Web, INPS’ Vision LAN and TPP’s SystmOne. The interfaces have been developed in response to user demand and provide immediate benefits to users, saving time and reducing the risk of data entry errors.
     

    Read more

     

  • INRstar interfaces to EMIS, INPS and TPP systems
    INRstar, 14 May 2013

    INRstar, the UK market leader for anticoagulation management software, has developed new interfaces to three of the market leading GP clinical systems - EMIS’s LV, PCS and Web, INPS’ Vision LAN and TPP’s SystmOne. The interfaces have been developed in response to user demand and provide immediate benefits to users, saving time and reducing the risk of data entry errors.
     

    Read more

     

  • AF hastens cognitive decline
    MedPage, 5 June 2013

    The development of atrial fibrillation was associated with a more rapid decline in cognitive function among older adults, even in the absence of clinical stroke, researchers found.

    Read more

     

  • AF hastens cognitive decline
    MedPage, 5 June 2013

    The development of atrial fibrillation was associated with a more rapid decline in cognitive function among older adults, even in the absence of clinical stroke, researchers found.

    Read more

     

  • Guidelines for safer use of anticoagulants in hospitals
    MedScape, 28 May 2013

    The risks of anticoagulants, which are associated with about 7% of all medication errors among hospitalized patients, can be reduced by actions such as using standardized dosing protocols that are accessible on every hospital floor and via the patient's electronic health records, according to consensus guidelines designed to improve health while reducing risks in the inpatient setting.

    Please note - you will be prompted to sign in to access this free website.

    Read more

     

  • Guidelines for safer use of anticoagulants in hospitals
    MedScape, 28 May 2013

    The risks of anticoagulants, which are associated with about 7% of all medication errors among hospitalized patients, can be reduced by actions such as using standardized dosing protocols that are accessible on every hospital floor and via the patient's electronic health records, according to consensus guidelines designed to improve health while reducing risks in the inpatient setting.

    Please note - you will be prompted to sign in to access this free website.

    Read more

     

  • Results of FIRM ablation without pulmonary vein isolation
    StopAfib.org, 30 May 2013

    In this video interview, Dr. Sanjiv Narayan talked about the PRECISE trial, the late breaking clinical trial that he presented at Heart Rhythm 2013. This multicenter trial looked at whether FIRM ablation alone would work. Total ablation time in the trial averaged about 20 minutes. While they are still early in follow up, the data he presented showed a success rate of just over 80% at about nine months. He also shared FIRM data that was presented at HRS by other investigators.

    Read more

     

  • Results of FIRM ablation without pulmonary vein isolation
    StopAfib.org, 30 May 2013

    In this video interview, Dr. Sanjiv Narayan talked about the PRECISE trial, the late breaking clinical trial that he presented at Heart Rhythm 2013. This multicenter trial looked at whether FIRM ablation alone would work. Total ablation time in the trial averaged about 20 minutes. While they are still early in follow up, the data he presented showed a success rate of just over 80% at about nine months. He also shared FIRM data that was presented at HRS by other investigators.

    Read more

     

  • Rivaroxaban approved for ACS secondary prevention in Europe
    theHeart.org, 24 May 2013

    The European Commission has given its approval to the oral factor Xa inhibitor rivaroxaban (Xarelto, Bayer Pharma/Janssen Pharmaceuticals) for secondary prevention in adult patients who have had biomarker-confirmed acute coronary syndrome (ACS), Bayer announced today. The indication is for 2.5-mg twice daily in combination with standard antiplatelet therapy.

    Read more

     

  • Rivaroxaban approved for ACS secondary prevention in Europe
    theHeart.org, 24 May 2013

    The European Commission has given its approval to the oral factor Xa inhibitor rivaroxaban (Xarelto, Bayer Pharma/Janssen Pharmaceuticals) for secondary prevention in adult patients who have had biomarker-confirmed acute coronary syndrome (ACS), Bayer announced today. The indication is for 2.5-mg twice daily in combination with standard antiplatelet therapy.

    Read more

     

  • Ailing ARCA Biopharma seeks $20M to fund trials, stay in business
    Xconomy.com, 30 May 2013

    ARCA biopharma announced today it will try to raise $20 million in an equity offering to stay afloat while it continues Phase 2 and 3 trials of its treatment for atrial fibrillation.

    Read more

     

  • Ailing ARCA Biopharma seeks $20M to fund trials, stay in business
    Xconomy.com, 30 May 2013

    ARCA biopharma announced today it will try to raise $20 million in an equity offering to stay afloat while it continues Phase 2 and 3 trials of its treatment for atrial fibrillation.

    Read more

     

  • Survey highlights stroke protection as treatment priority for patients with AF
    The Wall Street Journal, 28 May 2013

    New findings from a pan-European online survey of 1,000 physicians have demonstrated that for over two thirds of physicians, preventing ischaemic stroke is the most important treatment goal for patients with atrial fibrillation (AF). Ischaemic stroke is the most common type of stroke suffered by patients with AF, and as such physicians across Europe have highlighted the vital need for increased awareness of the true incidence and impact in this patient population. The survey findings were announced in parallel with the European Stroke Conference in London (28th-31st May) and highlight the need for additional information and education about the risk and impact of ischaemic stroke on the lives of AF patients.

    Read more

     

  • Survey highlights stroke protection as treatment priority for patients with AF
    The Wall Street Journal, 28 May 2013

    New findings from a pan-European online survey of 1,000 physicians have demonstrated that for over two thirds of physicians, preventing ischaemic stroke is the most important treatment goal for patients with atrial fibrillation (AF). Ischaemic stroke is the most common type of stroke suffered by patients with AF, and as such physicians across Europe have highlighted the vital need for increased awareness of the true incidence and impact in this patient population. The survey findings were announced in parallel with the European Stroke Conference in London (28th-31st May) and highlight the need for additional information and education about the risk and impact of ischaemic stroke on the lives of AF patients.

    Read more

     

  • Silent AF linked to stroke in diabetes
    MedPape, 28 May 2013

    Asymptomatic atrial fibrillation might lie behind stroke of unknown origin in patients with type 2 diabetes, researchers suggested. Among 1,992 people screened for the study, there was a higher prevalence of brief subclinical episodes of atrial fibrillation at baseline in diabetics than in healthy matched controls (9% versus 1.6%, P<0.0001), according to Raffaele Marfella, MD, PhD, of the Second University of Naples, in Naples, Italy, and colleagues.

    Read more

     

  • Silent AF linked to stroke in diabetes
    MedPape, 28 May 2013

    Asymptomatic atrial fibrillation might lie behind stroke of unknown origin in patients with type 2 diabetes, researchers suggested. Among 1,992 people screened for the study, there was a higher prevalence of brief subclinical episodes of atrial fibrillation at baseline in diabetics than in healthy matched controls (9% versus 1.6%, P<0.0001), according to Raffaele Marfella, MD, PhD, of the Second University of Naples, in Naples, Italy, and colleagues.

    Read more

     

  • Understanding and preventing AF-strokes
    24th May 2013

    Read more

     

  • Understanding and preventing AF-strokes
    24th May 2013

    Read more

     

  • Radiofrequency Ablation vs. Antiarrhythmiac Drugs as First-Line Therapy of Atrial Fibrillation
    14th May 2013

    Performing Pulmonary Vein Antrum Isolation, or PVAI, early on may be the best solution for some patients with symptomatic atrial fibrillation (AF), according to MetroHealth Heart & Vascular Center experts. As the duration of AF increases, atrial enlargement and scarring makes the procedure less likely to be effective.

    Read more

     

  • Radiofrequency Ablation vs. Antiarrhythmiac Drugs as First-Line Therapy of Atrial Fibrillation
    14th May 2013

    Performing Pulmonary Vein Antrum Isolation, or PVAI, early on may be the best solution for some patients with symptomatic atrial fibrillation (AF), according to MetroHealth Heart & Vascular Center experts. As the duration of AF increases, atrial enlargement and scarring makes the procedure less likely to be effective.

    Read more

     

  • BRUISE CONTROL: Surgery with continued warfarin reduced adverse outcomes
    10th May 2013

    DENVER — A strategy of continued warfarin during implantable cardioverter defibrillator or pacemaker surgery reduced the incidence of device-pocket hematoma compared with bridging therapy with heparin, according to results from the BRUISE CONTROL trial.

    Read more

     

  • BRUISE CONTROL: Surgery with continued warfarin reduced adverse outcomes
    10th May 2013

    DENVER — A strategy of continued warfarin during implantable cardioverter defibrillator or pacemaker surgery reduced the incidence of device-pocket hematoma compared with bridging therapy with heparin, according to results from the BRUISE CONTROL trial.

    Read more

     

  • Oral anticoagulants less used in paroxysmal than persistent AF: NCDR data
    9th May 2013

    Denver, CO - Cardiologists are significantly less likely to prescribe oral anticoagulation therapy for their patients with paroxysmal, compared with persistent, atrial fibrillation, despite similar thromboembolic risks associated with the two forms of AF, suggests an analysis based on data from the National Cardiovascular Data Registry (NCDR) [1].

    The guidelines call for oral anticoagulation therapy for AF regardless of whether it's paroxysmal or persistent, observed Dr Jonathan C Hsu (University of California, San Francisco), who presented the analysis here at the Heart Rhythm Society 2013 Scientific Sessions. It's based on about 62 000 patients with a CHADS2 score of >2 treated at private and academic cardiology practices and who entered the NCDR PINNACLE registry from 2008 to 2012.

     

    Read more

     

  • Oral anticoagulants less used in paroxysmal than persistent AF: NCDR data
    9th May 2013

    Denver, CO - Cardiologists are significantly less likely to prescribe oral anticoagulation therapy for their patients with paroxysmal, compared with persistent, atrial fibrillation, despite similar thromboembolic risks associated with the two forms of AF, suggests an analysis based on data from the National Cardiovascular Data Registry (NCDR) [1].

    The guidelines call for oral anticoagulation therapy for AF regardless of whether it's paroxysmal or persistent, observed Dr Jonathan C Hsu (University of California, San Francisco), who presented the analysis here at the Heart Rhythm Society 2013 Scientific Sessions. It's based on about 62 000 patients with a CHADS2 score of >2 treated at private and academic cardiology practices and who entered the NCDR PINNACLE registry from 2008 to 2012.

     

    Read more

     

  • No benefit of fish oil in high-risk patients
    8th May 2013

    Milan, Italy - The supplemental use of n-3 fatty acids does not reduce the risk of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality in patients with multiple cardiovascular-disease risk factors [1].

    These are the conclusions of the Risk and Prevention Study Collaborative Group, a collective of Italian researchers led by Maria Carla Roncaglioni (Mario Negri Institute of Pharmacological Research, Milan, Italy). In addition to having no effect on the study's primary end point in this group of patients with multiple cardiovascular risk factors or atherosclerotic disease, but no previous MI, the researchers did not observe any benefit on secondary end points, including death from coronary causes or sudden death from cardiac causes or major ventricular arrhythmias.

    Read more

     

  • No benefit of fish oil in high-risk patients
    8th May 2013

    Milan, Italy - The supplemental use of n-3 fatty acids does not reduce the risk of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality in patients with multiple cardiovascular-disease risk factors [1].

    These are the conclusions of the Risk and Prevention Study Collaborative Group, a collective of Italian researchers led by Maria Carla Roncaglioni (Mario Negri Institute of Pharmacological Research, Milan, Italy). In addition to having no effect on the study's primary end point in this group of patients with multiple cardiovascular risk factors or atherosclerotic disease, but no previous MI, the researchers did not observe any benefit on secondary end points, including death from coronary causes or sudden death from cardiac causes or major ventricular arrhythmias.

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  • Treating paroxysmal AF during cardiac surgery improves outcomes
    8th May 2013

    Minneapolis, MN - Treatment of paroxysmal atrial fibrillation (PAF) during cardiac surgery shows benefits ranging from reduced perioperative complications to lower mortality rates, compared with untreated PAF, new research concludes [1]. "The survival in patients who were treated was better than untreated and equal to patients with no atrial fibrillation, bringing up the provocative idea of whether atrial-fibrillation treatment does increase survival," said lead author Dr Patrick M McCarthy (Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, Chicago, IL).

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  • Treating paroxysmal AF during cardiac surgery improves outcomes
    8th May 2013

    Minneapolis, MN - Treatment of paroxysmal atrial fibrillation (PAF) during cardiac surgery shows benefits ranging from reduced perioperative complications to lower mortality rates, compared with untreated PAF, new research concludes [1]. "The survival in patients who were treated was better than untreated and equal to patients with no atrial fibrillation, bringing up the provocative idea of whether atrial-fibrillation treatment does increase survival," said lead author Dr Patrick M McCarthy (Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, Chicago, IL).

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  • PE thrombolysis in the elderly and those with comorbidities
    3th May 2013

    A large observational study has shown a remarkable 50% reduction in the mortality rate of hemodynamically unstable patients with PE—who do not have absolute contraindications—when they are treated with thrombolytic therapy.
     

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  • PE thrombolysis in the elderly and those with comorbidities
    3th May 2013

    A large observational study has shown a remarkable 50% reduction in the mortality rate of hemodynamically unstable patients with PE—who do not have absolute contraindications—when they are treated with thrombolytic therapy.
     

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  • Fish oils to prevent CHD . . . it's now official: A definite "no go"
    8th May 2013

    The GISSI group's impressive, collaborative study just published in NEJM puts to bed any lingering theory stipulating a positive effect of fish oils to prevent heart disease in patients who have not had an MI and do not have HF.

    Will this convince our patients?

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  • Fish oils to prevent CHD . . . it's now official: A definite "no go"
    8th May 2013

    The GISSI group's impressive, collaborative study just published in NEJM puts to bed any lingering theory stipulating a positive effect of fish oils to prevent heart disease in patients who have not had an MI and do not have HF.

    Will this convince our patients?

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  • More Musing About the Interrelationships of Atrial Fibrillation and Atrial Flutter and Their Clinical Implications
    6th May 2013

    The interrelationship between atrial fibrillation (AF) and atrial flutter (AFL) has long been recognized both in patients and animal models1. There are two important aspects of this interrelationship relevant to the paper by Mohanty et al.2 in this issue of this journal. First is the fact that AF virtually always precedes the onset of classical cavotricuspid isthmus (CTI) dependent AFL, and second, the development of classical CTI AFL requires the development or presence of a line of block in the right atrium between the venae cavae1.
     

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  • More Musing About the Interrelationships of Atrial Fibrillation and Atrial Flutter and Their Clinical Implications
    6th May 2013

    The interrelationship between atrial fibrillation (AF) and atrial flutter (AFL) has long been recognized both in patients and animal models1. There are two important aspects of this interrelationship relevant to the paper by Mohanty et al.2 in this issue of this journal. First is the fact that AF virtually always precedes the onset of classical cavotricuspid isthmus (CTI) dependent AFL, and second, the development of classical CTI AFL requires the development or presence of a line of block in the right atrium between the venae cavae1.
     

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  • Bristol-Myers Squibb and Pfizer publish ARISTOTLE subanalysis
    8th May 2013

    Bristol-Myers Squibb and Pfizer have revealed the results of a subanalysis of the ARISTOTLE trial. The findings showed that reductions in stroke or systemic embolism, the number of major bleeding events and mortality demonstrated with Eliquis in comparison to warfarin in the ARISTOTLE trial. Consistencies were found across subgroups based on the levels of International Normalised Ratio (INR) control in patients with nonvalvular atrial fibrillation.
     

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  • Bristol-Myers Squibb and Pfizer publish ARISTOTLE subanalysis
    8th May 2013

    Bristol-Myers Squibb and Pfizer have revealed the results of a subanalysis of the ARISTOTLE trial. The findings showed that reductions in stroke or systemic embolism, the number of major bleeding events and mortality demonstrated with Eliquis in comparison to warfarin in the ARISTOTLE trial. Consistencies were found across subgroups based on the levels of International Normalised Ratio (INR) control in patients with nonvalvular atrial fibrillation.
     

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  • Biosense Webster Showcases Cutting Edge Innovation and Leadership in AF Ablation at HRS Annual Scientific Sessions 2013
    8th May 2013

    Biosense Webster, Inc., a worldwide leader in the diagnosis and treatment of cardiac arrhythmias, will showcase its portfolio of cutting edge innovative technologies and its unrivaled leadership in atrial fibrillation ablation at the 2013 Heart Rhythm Society's 34th Annual Scientific Sessions in Denver. This meeting draws experts in cardiac rhythm management from around the globe to explore the therapeutics and technologies shaping the future of this dynamic field.
     

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  • Biosense Webster Showcases Cutting Edge Innovation and Leadership in AF Ablation at HRS Annual Scientific Sessions 2013
    8th May 2013

    Biosense Webster, Inc., a worldwide leader in the diagnosis and treatment of cardiac arrhythmias, will showcase its portfolio of cutting edge innovative technologies and its unrivaled leadership in atrial fibrillation ablation at the 2013 Heart Rhythm Society's 34th Annual Scientific Sessions in Denver. This meeting draws experts in cardiac rhythm management from around the globe to explore the therapeutics and technologies shaping the future of this dynamic field.
     

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  • How safe is cryoballoon ablation of atrial fibrillation?
    22nd April 2013

    If one is going to write about procedural complications for the treatment of atrial fibrillation, it is imperative to begin with givens: First, the only guaranteed way to avoid complications is to avoid doing procedures. Second, patients with AF must know that they can choose to live with their disease. Nobody needs an ablation. Third, what makes treatment decisions for AF so tough is that the disease is not immediately life-threatening, but the treatment can be—both with drugs or ablation.

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  • How safe is cryoballoon ablation of atrial fibrillation?
    22nd April 2013

    If one is going to write about procedural complications for the treatment of atrial fibrillation, it is imperative to begin with givens: First, the only guaranteed way to avoid complications is to avoid doing procedures. Second, patients with AF must know that they can choose to live with their disease. Nobody needs an ablation. Third, what makes treatment decisions for AF so tough is that the disease is not immediately life-threatening, but the treatment can be—both with drugs or ablation.

    Read more

     

  • Breaking embargo: PREVAIL and how we publish data from clinical trials
    11th March 2013

    Heartwire's Shelley Wood sits down with Drs Timothy Gardner, Cindy Grines, and Sanjay Kaul to talk about why PREVAIL was pulled from the late-breaking trial sessions, if it's appropriate for journalists and other parties to see data before physicians, and whether or not the existing embargo process needs to be fixed.

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  • Breaking embargo: PREVAIL and how we publish data from clinical trials
    11th March 2013

    Heartwire's Shelley Wood sits down with Drs Timothy Gardner, Cindy Grines, and Sanjay Kaul to talk about why PREVAIL was pulled from the late-breaking trial sessions, if it's appropriate for journalists and other parties to see data before physicians, and whether or not the existing embargo process needs to be fixed.

    Read more

     

  • Debating digoxin in AF: New analysis suggests no mortality risk
    18th April 2013

    Published online April 16, 2013 in the European Heart Journal, the new report contrasts with a 2012 analysis of the same data that suggested digoxin was associated with an increased risk of all-cause mortality.

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  • Debating digoxin in AF: New analysis suggests no mortality risk
    18th April 2013

    Published online April 16, 2013 in the European Heart Journal, the new report contrasts with a 2012 analysis of the same data that suggested digoxin was associated with an increased risk of all-cause mortality.

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  • Cardiac Rhythm News: Top stories from ACC 2013
    8-11th May 2013

    VeniceArrhythmias 2013 Presidents, Drs. Antonio Raviele, Andrea Natale and Sakis Themistoclakis, along with the VA2013 Staff, will attend the forthcoming edition of Heart Rhythm, the Annual Scientific Sessions organized by the Heart Rhythm Society – and one among the most relevant cardiology events on a worldwide scale, gathering thousands of participants from all over the world.

     

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  • Cardiac Rhythm News: Top stories from ACC 2013
    8-11th May 2013

    VeniceArrhythmias 2013 Presidents, Drs. Antonio Raviele, Andrea Natale and Sakis Themistoclakis, along with the VA2013 Staff, will attend the forthcoming edition of Heart Rhythm, the Annual Scientific Sessions organized by the Heart Rhythm Society – and one among the most relevant cardiology events on a worldwide scale, gathering thousands of participants from all over the world.

     

    Read more

     

  • Nursing Times Awards 2013
    Wednesday 30th October 2013

    This year, more than any other, is the time to showcase what you do best. With the spotlight on healthcare and the standard of nursing following publication of the Francis report, there has never been a better time to demonstrate to the public and each other that you embody the 6Cs identified as the values underpinning excellent nursing: care, compassion, competence, communication, courage and commitment. The Nursing Times Awards offer you an opportunity to show the world how your innovations and hard work are improving the care you give your patients.

    Every year we receive hundreds of entries to the Nursing Times Awards that tell us what nurses have done to create a safer health environment, one that puts the patient first.

    Nurses are doing the difficult things because they are the right things to do for the patient. And now it's time to be honoured for that hard work.

    You've done the most difficult thing of all in changing your service - entering our awards is free and easy.

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  • Nursing Times Awards 2013
    Wednesday 30th October 2013

    This year, more than any other, is the time to showcase what you do best. With the spotlight on healthcare and the standard of nursing following publication of the Francis report, there has never been a better time to demonstrate to the public and each other that you embody the 6Cs identified as the values underpinning excellent nursing: care, compassion, competence, communication, courage and commitment. The Nursing Times Awards offer you an opportunity to show the world how your innovations and hard work are improving the care you give your patients.

    Every year we receive hundreds of entries to the Nursing Times Awards that tell us what nurses have done to create a safer health environment, one that puts the patient first.

    Nurses are doing the difficult things because they are the right things to do for the patient. And now it's time to be honoured for that hard work.

    You've done the most difficult thing of all in changing your service - entering our awards is free and easy.

    Read more

     

  • Dabigatran etexilate found superior to warfarin in study
    Pharmaceutical Business Review, 7 Nov 2012

    RE-LY trial has demonstrated that both doses of dabigatran etexilate (150mg bid and 110 mg bid) offer clinical benefits over warfarin when used in stroke prevention in patients with atrial fibrillation (AF).

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  • Dabigatran etexilate found superior to warfarin in study
    Pharmaceutical Business Review, 7 Nov 2012

    RE-LY trial has demonstrated that both doses of dabigatran etexilate (150mg bid and 110 mg bid) offer clinical benefits over warfarin when used in stroke prevention in patients with atrial fibrillation (AF).

    Read more

     

  • Risk of stroke and oral anticoagulant use in atrial fibrillation
    NHS, 11 Oct 2012

    Oral anticoagulants substantially reduce the risk of stroke in atrial fibrillation but are underutilised in current practice. The aim of this study was to measure the distribution of stroke risk in patients with atrial fibrillation (using the CHADS2 and CHA2DS2-VASc scores) and changes in oral anticoagulant use during 2007-2010.

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  • AF rising in dialysis patients
    MedPage, 9 Oct 2012

    Atrial fibrillation onset soon after starting dialysis has risen over the past decade, although the high mortality risk associated with the comorbidity has been falling, a national analysis showed.

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  • Drinking can increase atrial fibrillation in heart disease patients
    CMAJ, 2 Oct 2012

    Moderate consumption of alcohol may result in an increased risk of atrial fibrillation among individuals with heart disease and progressive diabetes, according to a study in the Canadian Medical Association Journal (CMAJ).

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  • NICE seeks members for independent advisory committees
    NICE, 18 June 2013

    The National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) is recruiting members to join its four independent advisory Appraisal Committees. The Appraisal Committees consider and interpret evidence on the clinical and cost effectiveness of health technologies and formulates recommendations on their use.

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  • Associations Between Atrial Fibrillation and Silent Cerebral Infarctions
    HCPLive, 12 Nov 2014

    A meta-analysis of many older studies may explain the recent observation that patients with atrial fibrillation (AF) frequently suffered cognitive ...

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  • Vernakalant drug more effective than Ibutilide in treating recent-onset atrial fibrillation
    News Medical, 2 May 2016

    Vernakalant, a new drug for treating recent-onset atrial fibrillation, has proved to be considerably more effective than Ibutilide, an established drug in this indication. It was able to normalize patients' heart rhythm more rapidly and with fewer side-effects ocurring. This was revealed by a study conducted at the Department of Emergency Medicine at Medical University of Vienna/General Hospital that has recently been published in "Europace", a journal of the European Society of Cardiology.

    Read more

     

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